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Domestic Violence (DV) is one of the most prevalent forms of victimization afflicting our society today. To be properly battled, it will require more.

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Presentation on theme: "Domestic Violence (DV) is one of the most prevalent forms of victimization afflicting our society today. To be properly battled, it will require more."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Domestic Violence (DV) is one of the most prevalent forms of victimization afflicting our society today. To be properly battled, it will require more time, resources, training and understanding than any other major social problem facing the criminal justice system today. While great strides have been made to combat DV, and to recognize its dangers…much more remains to be done.

3 Domestic Violence (DV) is one of the most prevalent forms of victimization afflicting our society today. To be properly battled, it will require more time, resources, training and understanding than any other major social problem facing the criminal justice system today. While great strides have been made to combat DV, and to recognize its dangers…much more remains to be done. I’ve chosen this topic... because I grew up in a DV household. While my father only became physically violent once, the verbal and emotional abuse had a significant effect on my family. We eventually escaped his abuse, and we all, to some extent, became involved in DV advocacy organizations.

4 Who are victims of domestic violence? Domestic violence affects people from all walks of life. Anyone of any gender, race, age, class, religion, etc…

5 Who are victims of domestic violence? Domestic violence affects people from all walks of life. Anyone of any gender, race, age, class, religion, etc… But there are factors that increase likelihood… In 2001, 85% of reported DV assaults are perpetrated against women… (Bureau of Justice Statistics Crime Data Brief, Feb 2003) 324,000 pregnant women experience violence from their partner each year… (Maternal and Child Health Journal, 2000) 50% of men who batter their wives also abuse their children… (Physical Violence in American Families; Strauss, Gelles & Smith, 1990) 21 out of every 1,000 women living on less than $7,500/year reported being assaulted by an intimate partner… (Bureau of Justice Statistics, Intimate Partner Violence, 2000)

6 What form does DV victimization take? While DV usually conjures up images of physical harm, domestic abuse takes numerous forms: Assault & Murder Confinement & Isolation Sexual Assault & Rape Verbal abuse Emotional abuse & Coercion Financial exploitation Theft or destruction of property Essentially, any harmful act or behavior committed in a domestic or intimate partnership setting can be viewed as a form of abuse.

7 Domestic violence isn’t a new problem… For most of this country’s history, domestic abuse was accepted, and often expected, of a man to keep his household under control…

8 Domestic violence isn’t a new problem… For most of this country’s history, domestic abuse was accepted, and often expected, of a man to keep his household under control… The Women’s Rights Movement of the 1970s… Grassroots projects in hundreds of communities nationwide established women’s newspapers, cafes, health and reproductive clinics. They fought for the financial, educational and professional rights of all women. They also called attention to the plight of domestic violence victims, and created shelters for and resources for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. The laws would soon follow…

9 Federal Laws With the emergence of this newly recognized group of victims came the laws intended to protect them… US CODE: TITLE 42: CHAPTER 110: FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES …assist States in efforts to increase public awareness about and prevent family violence and to provide immediate shelter and related assistance for victims of family violence and their dependents… …provide for technical assistance and training relating to family violence programs to States, local public agencies (including law enforcement agencies, courts, legal, social service, and health care professionals), nonprofit private organizations, and other persons seeking such assistance…

10 Federal Laws Violence Against Women Act of 1994 Signed into law in 1994 by President Bill Clinton as part of the “Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994”, VAWA provided: Funding to enhance investigation and prosecution of violent crime perpetrated against women Increased pre-trial detention of the accused Automatic and mandatory restitution of those convicted Allowance of civil redress in cases prosecutors chose not to prosecute

11 Washington State Laws RCW Chapter 10.99: Official Response to DV Intended to recognize the importance of DV as a serious crime Assure the maximum protection that can be provided Attempts to close the disparity in treatment of crimes committed between cohabitants, as opposed to strangers Stress the enforcement of laws and communicate intolerance of violent behavior Intends the laws be enforced without regard to the relationship status of those involved

12 Washington State Laws RCW Chapter 26.50: Domestic Violence Prevention Act Strengthened criminal and civil remedies for victims Outlined specific procedures for issuance of protection orders for victims Called for mandatory arrest of suspected abusers RCW Chapter : Shelter for Victims of DV Intended to fund and provide temporary shelter for victims of domestic violence Assist victims in finding long-term alternative living situations

13 Trends – NCVS Intimate Partner Violence (Bureau of Justice Statistics Intimate Partner Violence, 2000)

14 Trends – UCR-SHR Intimate Partner Homicide (76-98) (Bureau of Justice Statistics Intimate Partner Violence, 2000)

15 Washington State Domestic Violence Offenses Includes simple assaults and violations of protection and no-contact orders, (Crime In Washington 2004 Annual Report, Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs)

16 Pierce County Domestic Violence Offenses in 2004 (Crime In Washington 2004 Annual Report, Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs) 5,773 1, Simple Assault: Order Violations: Aggravated Assault: Burglary: Larceny: Motor Vehicle Theft: Rape: Robbery: Murder: Arson:

17 Pierce County Domestic Violence Offenses in 2004 (Crime In Washington 2004 Annual Report, Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs) 5,773 1, ,068 Simple Assault: Order Violations: Aggravated Assault: Burglary: Larceny: Motor Vehicle Theft: Rape: Robbery: Murder: Arson: Total Offenses:

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19 The Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Program of Jefferson County in Port Townsend, Washington

20 The Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Program of Jefferson County in Port Townsend, Washington Started 25 years ago as part of a grassroots movement Presently has a $300,000/year budget 7 Full-time employees, 6 Volunteers Off-site shelter that can house up to 12 clients Currently working to build a brand new office near other social service resources Office planned to include apartments for client transitional housing with 3-year occupancy limit

21 The Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Program of Jefferson County in Port Townsend, Washington DV Prevention: DV/SA employs many public awareness and prevention methods, including: Educational programs in local schools Flyers, newsletters and mailings Regular contact with local media Presence at major town events Referrals through other social service agencies Public awareness and training projects Training for Police and CJS workers

22 The Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Program of Jefferson County in Port Townsend, Washington DV Recovery: DV/SA offers some recovery services to their clients, including: Referral to other social service agencies Ongoing counseling Victim support groups and resources Short-term transitional housing Education for victims of violence Holiday toy drive for low-income families Job opportunities and referrals Relocation assistance

23 The Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Program of Jefferson County in Port Townsend, Washington DV Intervention: Three primary ways clients learn of DV/SA: Referral by Police/Courts/Health Professionals Advertising & Public Outreach Word of mouth No person is turned down for service unless the other party involved in the DV situation is already a client.

24 The Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Program of Jefferson County in Port Townsend, Washington DV Intervention: Steps for client intake: Client meets with advocate to discuss needs Pertinent information is gathered Intake paperwork is signed, including: Release of Information Client’s Rights State Intake Form for reporting to OCVA Rules for Shelter (if applicable) Confidentiality Agreement (if applicable) Client meets legal advocate if needed

25 The Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Program of Jefferson County in Port Townsend, Washington DV Intervention: Most commonly dispensed services: Counseling Legal assistance: Dissolution Parenting plans Safety plans Emergency shelter - 3-month Short-term shelter at motel – OCVA funded Most problematic gap in service: Lack of pro-bono lawyers in Jefferson County

26 The Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Program of Jefferson County in Port Townsend, Washington Staff information: Interest and involvement: The staff members at DV/SA share a common goal of changing society’s views of domestic and sexual abuse, and helping victims discover their power to leave their situations, or develop ways to live with it. Education and experience: Staff members have diverse educational and professional backgrounds. However, they all receive over 40 hours training per year through OCVA, WSCADV, WCSAP and other organizations.

27 The Domestic Violence/Sexual Assault Program of Jefferson County in Port Townsend, Washington Better serving victims Some staff-suggested improvements for CJS: Courts should work more closely with programs LEOs should have more mandatory DV training Police/DV Specialty officers Advocacy programs should work together

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