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Phoenix Charter Middle School 1100 Gator Way Gatornation, Florida 32660 Office: (852) 660-6600 Fax: (582) 660-6601 Website: www.phoenixcharter.eduWebsite:

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Presentation on theme: "Phoenix Charter Middle School 1100 Gator Way Gatornation, Florida 32660 Office: (852) 660-6600 Fax: (582) 660-6601 Website: www.phoenixcharter.eduWebsite:"— Presentation transcript:

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2 Phoenix Charter Middle School 1100 Gator Way Gatornation, Florida Office: (852) Fax: (582) Website: address: Where teachers are learning professionals!

3 Agenda I Training Registration/Sign-in and Meet & Greet Colleagues 8:00 – 8:20 II Brainpower Buffet Breakfast8:20 – 8:50 IIIWelcome and Introductions8:50 – 9:00 IVPurpose of Reading Better Curriculum Training9:00 – 9:15 VWhat is the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy 9:15 – 10:15 Education in regards to the Reading Better Curriculum? VIBrainpower Break10:15 – 10:30 VII What is the Creative Commons Licensing in regards to the 10:30 – 11:00 Reading Better Curriculum? VIII When it doubt, write it out. What to do if one is uncertain about 11:00 – 11:30 the usage of copyrighted materials. IXQuestions, comments, and/or concerns11:30 – 12:00 XReading Better Curriculum Training Adjournment12:00

4 The purpose for the Reading Better Curriculum Training is to complete a thorough review of the new curriculum materials including the textbook, workbook, teacher guides, and support resources. The support resources are the CD and classroom video series that students will use in the computer and media labs. The additional purpose for the Reading Better Curriculum Training is to examine the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education and Creative Commons Licensing.

5 Fair use is the right to use copyrighted material without permission or payment under some circumstances and situations such as when the cultural or social benefits of the use are predominant (most frequent or prevailing). Also, it is the general right that applies even in situations where the law provides no specific authorization for the use in question – as it does for certain narrowly or limited defined classroom activities.

6 Media literacy education is the capacity to access, analyze, evaluate, and communicate messages in a wide variety of forms. It helps people of all ages to be critical thinker, effective communicators, and active citizens. It also may occur as a separate program or course but often it is embedded within other subject areas, including literature, history, anthropology, sociology, public health, journalism, communication, and education. It can occur in formal and informal educational settings from a K-12 classroom to an after-school day camp.

7 Media literacy education distinctively features the analytical attitude that teachers and learners, working together, adopt toward the media objects they study. The foundation of effective media analysis is the recognition that: All media messages are constructed Each medium has different characteristics and strengths and a unique language of construction Media messages are produced for particular purposes All media messages contain embedded values and points of view People use their individual skills, beliefs, and experiences to construct their own meanings from media messages Media and media messages can influence beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, and democratic processes.

8 Fair Use and education for educators and learners in media literacy often make uses of copyrighted materials that stand outside the marketplace. For instance, in the classroom, at a conference, and the like such uses, especially when they occur within a restricted-access network, do enjoy certain copyright advantages. As a matter of fact, they may be less likely to be challenged by rights holders. More important, however, if challenged they would be more likely to receive special consideration under the fair use doctrine-because they occur within an educational setting.

9 The following is five sets of current practices in use of the copyrighted materials in media literacy education to which the doctrine of fair use applies. These principles apply to all forms of media such as usage of print, images, moving-image media, and sound media in both digital and analog forms. The principles apply in institutional settings and to non-school-based programs such as the classrooms from K-16 educational systems, community based programs, lab, or technological centers, and after-school or educational camps.

10 The principles concern the unlicensed fair use of copyrighted materials for education, not the way those materials were acquired is irrelevant whether the source of the content in question was a recorded over-the-air broadcast, a teachers personal copy of a newspaper of a DVD, or a rented or borrowed piece of media. However, if a teacher is using materials subject to a license agreement negotiated by the school or school system, she or he may be bound by the terms of that license. The principles are all subject to a rule of proportionality. Educators and students fair use rights extend to the portions of copyrighted works that they need to accomplish their educational goals.

11 The following is the set of five principles of Fair Use. Employing copyrighted material in media literacy lessons Description –Educators use television news, advertising, movies still images, newspaper, and magazine articles, Web sites, video games, and other copyrighted material to build critical thinking and communication skills. Principle- Under the fair use, educators using the concepts and techniques of media literacy can choose illustrative material from the full range of copyrighted sources and make them available to learners, in class in workshops, etc. Limitations-Educators should choose material that is closely related to the project or topic, using only what is deemed necessary for the educational goal or purpose for which it is being made.

12 Employing copyrighted material in preparing curriculum materials Description – Teachers use copyrighted materials in the creation of lesson plans, materials, tool kits, curricula in order to apply the principles of media literacy education and use digital technologies effectively in an educational context. Principle – Under fair use, educators using the concepts and techniques of media literacy can integrate copyrighted material into curriculum materials, including books, workbooks, podcasts, DVD compilations, videos, Web sites, and other materials designed for learning. Limitations – Wherever possible, educators should provide attributes for quoted materials.

13 Sharing media literacy curriculum materials Description – Media literacy curriculum materials always include copyrighted content from mass media and popular culture. Principle – Educators using concepts and techniques of media literacy should be able to share effective examples of teaching about media and meaning with one another, including lessons and resource materials. Limitations – In materials curriculum developers wish to share, they should be especially careful to choose illustrations from copyrighted media that are necessary to meet the educational objectives of the lesson, using only what furthers the educational goal or purpose for which it is being made.

14 Student use of copyrighted materials in their own academic and creative work Description – Students strengthen media literacy skills by creating messages and using such symbolic forms as language, images, sound, music, and digital media to express and share meaning. Principle – Media literacy education cannot thrive unless learners themselves have the opportunity to learn about how media functions at the most practical level, for this reason educators using concepts and techniques of media literacy should be free to enable learners to incorporate, modify, and re-present existing media objects in their own classroom work. Limitations – Students use of copyrighted material should not be a substitute for creative effort. Students should be able to understand and demonstrate, in a manner appropriate to their developmental level, how their use of a copyrighted work repurposes or transforms the original.

15 Developing audiences for student work Description – Students who are expected to behave responsibly as media creators and who are encouraged to reach other people outside the classroom with their work learn most deeply. Principle – Educators should work with learners to make a reason decision about distribution that reflects sound pedagogy and ethical values. Limitations – Educators and learners in media literacy often make uses of copyrighted works outside the marketplace, for instance in the classroom, a conference, or within a school-wide or district-wide festival.

16 Creative Commons is an organization that assists creators of media to easily make their works accessible and available to the general public for legal sharing and remixing. Creative Commons offer creators six licenses by which they may share their works. The licenses are: Attribution is a license that lets users distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the creator's work, even commercially, as long as the user credits the creators work. This is the most common license. Attribution Share Alike is a license that lets users remix, tweak, and build upon the creators work even for commercial reasons, as long as the user credits the creators work and licenses it using the new creations under the identical terms.

17 Attribution No Derivatives is a license which allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as the work is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to the creator. Attribution Non-Commercial is a license the lets users remix, tweak, and build upon the creators work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge the creator and be non-commercial, the user does not have to license his or her derivative work on the same terms.

18 Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike is a license that lets others remix, tweak, and build upon the creators work non-commercially, as long as they credit the creators work and license the new creations under the identical terms. Others may download and redistribute the creators work just like the by-nc-nd license, but the user can also translate, make remixes, and produces new stories based on the creators work. Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives is a license that is the most restrictive of all the licenses which allow distribution. This license is often called the free-advertising license because it allows users to download the creators work and share the creators work with others as long as the user mentions the creator and links the work back to the creator. Also, the user cannot change the work or use it commercially in any way.

19 When in doubt, write it out. This means that if you are not sure about what is permissible usage of the Reading Better Curriculum and other resources, please send a written request to the Curriculum Specialist so your concern may be properly address. The curriculum specialist will contact the Reading Better Curriculum consultant on your behave. This way all of the requests of the teacher and curriculum specialist will be documented accordingly. These efforts are protocol to protect everyone from legal matters that can occur if the curriculum materials are not used as to how they have been purchased and outlined to be used.

20 Questions, comments, and/or concerns about the Reading Better Curriculum. Please feel free to contact the training facilitator Sharla Head-Jones at (852) ext. 4900, if you should have any additional questions or concerns.

21 Thank you for attending the Reading Better Curriculum Training. Have a great school year!


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