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Emergency Management Higher Education Status Report National Academy of Sciences Disasters Roundtable The Emergency Manager of the Future June 13, 2003,

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Presentation on theme: "Emergency Management Higher Education Status Report National Academy of Sciences Disasters Roundtable The Emergency Manager of the Future June 13, 2003,"— Presentation transcript:

1 Emergency Management Higher Education Status Report National Academy of Sciences Disasters Roundtable The Emergency Manager of the Future June 13, 2003, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC B. Wayne Blanchard, Ph.D., CEM Emergency Management Higher Education Project Manager (301) ,

2 2 EM Higher Education Conference Participation n 111 Participants – Largest Ever -For EM & HS n 79 Colleges and Universities Represented n 7 College Systems, Associations, Centers n 41 States Represented & District of Columbia n 3 Countries Represented

3 Emergency Management College Programs by FY UNT - Univ. of No. Texas RIT – Rochester Inst. Of Tech. TESC – Thomas Edison State College WISC – Univ. of WI – Madison UNTRIT TESC WISC UC - Berkley Project Begins

4 4 Growth of Collegiate “Emergency Management” Programs n June 2001 – 72 n June 2002 – 78 n June 2003 – 96 – 7 Doctoral Programs –23 Masters Programs – 9 Bachelor Degrees –15 Associate Degrees –42 Certificates and Minors

5 5 Growth of Collegiate EM Programs Between Conferences n 20 Additional Programs n 2 Folded Programs Both were Emergency Mgmt. CertificatesBoth were Emergency Mgmt. Certificates n Net Increase of 18 New Programs n Average of 1 and 1/2 Per Month n Several Others Lined-Up For Fall Roll-Out

6 6 Projected Collegiate EM Program Growth n ~ 100 Programs Under Investigation or Development: –32 at Associate Level –39 at Bachelor Level –27 at Graduate Level – 1 Not Sure

7 Map of US Showing Status of EM College Programs by State Emer. Mgmt. Program in Place = Proposed Emer. Mgmt. Program =No Program = Related Emer. Mgmt. Program =

8 8 State Map Break-Out n 46 States Have EM or Related Programs or are Investigating or Developing One: 33 States Have Emergency Mgmt Programs33 States Have Emergency Mgmt Programs –DC & Puerto Rico Have Emergency Mgmt Programs as Well 10 States Are Investigating EM Programs10 States Are Investigating EM Programs 3 States Have EM-Related Programs 3 States Have EM-Related Programs 4 States Have No EM or Related Program 4 States Have No EM or Related Program –(Maine, Montana, Nebraska, Vermont)

9 9 Homeland Security Higher Education Programs n 15 Homeland Security/Terrorism Programs 4 Graduate-Level4 Graduate-Level 2 Bachelors-Level2 Bachelors-Level 2 Associate-Level2 Associate-Level 7 Continuing Education Unit-Level7 Continuing Education Unit-Level n 10 HS Programs Being Developed 7 Graduate-Level7 Graduate-Level 1 Bachelors-Level1 Bachelors-Level 2 CEU-Level2 CEU-Level

10 10 International Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance Higher Education Programs n 8 Collegiate Programs Andrews University, MichiganAndrews University, Michigan Johns Hopkins UniversityJohns Hopkins University Harvard School of Public Health & MITHarvard School of Public Health & MIT Tufts UniversityTufts University Tulane UniversityTulane University University of South Florida, TampaUniversity of South Florida, Tampa University of WisconsinUniversity of Wisconsin

11 11 Summary of Programs IN-PLACE: IN-PLACE: n 96 Emergency Management Programs n 15 Homeland Security/Terrorism Programs n 8 International Disaster Management Programs UNDER INVESTIGATION OR DEVELOPMENT: UNDER INVESTIGATION OR DEVELOPMENT: n ~ 100 Emergency Management Programs n 10 Homeland Security Programs

12 12 Programs Growing In Size As Well As Numbers n The Crisis and Disaster Management Program has steadily grown – to the point that it is now the 2 nd largest in the home department. (Dianna Havner Bryant, CMSU, April 2003) n The MPA EM Concentration program was overwhelmed this year – had to turn students away – more in queue for next semester. (Bill Waugh, GSU, April 2003)

13 13 Programs Growing In Size As Well As Numbers n EAM program going very well – 70 of 74 graduates landed EM-relevant jobs- $38 to $42K range. (Mary Ann Rollans, ATU, March 2003) n JSU is averaging 30 new graduate EM students per semester. (Brenda Phillips, Feb. 2003) n EM Certificate going so well we’re adding an AD. (Don Beckering, Hennipin TC, March 2003)

14 14 HiEd Courses Developed n Building Disaster Resilient Communities n Business and Industry Crisis Management n Hazards Mitigation Principles and Practice n Individual and Community Disaster Education n Political and Policy Basis of Emergency Management n Public Administration and Emergency Management n Research & Analysis Methods in Emergency Management n Social Dimensions of Disaster n Social Vulnerability Approach to Emergency Management n Sociology of Disaster n Technology and Emergency Management n Terrorism and Emergency Management n Tourism, Travel, Hospitality Mgmt. EM Implications

15 15 HiEd Projects Under Development n Coastal Hazards Management (Graduate) n Disaster Response Operations & Management n Earthquake Hazard Management n Hazards Risk Management n New Directions in Hazards Mitigation (Graduate) n Sustainable and Holistic Disaster Recovery n Theory, Principles and Fundamentals of Hazards, Disasters and Emergency Management n Introduction To Emer. Mgmt. Electronic Textbook

16 16 Course Development Contracts for FY Pending n Hazards Mapping and Modeling n Homeland Security and Terrorism n Introduction to Floodplain Management (Graduate Course)

17 17 FY 2004 Course Development Options FY 2004 Course Development Options n Hazards Risk Communication n Legal and Ethical Issues in Emergency Mgmt. n Mitigation Loss Reduction Methods of Analysis n Mitigation Planning n Natural Hazards Engineering for Non-Engineers n Politics of Disaster

18 18 Partnerships n North Carolina Division of Emer. Mgmt. n Coastal Services Center (DOC/NOAA) n U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (EM Div.) n Public Entity Risk Institute n National Science Foundation n Association of Floodplain Managers n Colleges and Universities -- Interns

19 19 EM Key Attributes/Elements “The Way It Ought To Be” n Elements: Comprehensive Emergency Mgmt. (All Hazards)Comprehensive Emergency Mgmt. (All Hazards) All Four Phases – Not Primarily ResponseAll Four Phases – Not Primarily Response Integrated Emergency ManagementIntegrated Emergency Management n Attributes: Full-Time Paid Professional Executive ManagerFull-Time Paid Professional Executive Manager Facilitator, Networker, Advisor, PartnerFacilitator, Networker, Advisor, Partner Broad Scientific and Technical Knowledge BaseBroad Scientific and Technical Knowledge Base Life-Long LearnerLife-Long Learner EM Professionals More Reflective of US Pop.EM Professionals More Reflective of US Pop. Makes Persuasive Articulate Case for Disaster ReductionMakes Persuasive Articulate Case for Disaster Reduction

20 20 21 st Century EM Core Competencies n Interpersonal Skills Communication and Presentation SkillsCommunication and Presentation Skills Networking, Partnering, NegotiatingNetworking, Partnering, Negotiating MarketingMarketing Bureaucratic, Organizational, Political KSAsBureaucratic, Organizational, Political KSAs n Management Skills and Principles People, Programs, Money, ResourcesPeople, Programs, Money, Resources Problem Solving, Critical Thinking, Decision- Making, Flexibility, PlanningProblem Solving, Critical Thinking, Decision- Making, Flexibility, Planning

21 21 21 st Century EM Core Competencies (Continued) n Theory, Principles, and Fundamentals of Hazards, Disasters, and Emer/Risk Mgmt. What are Hazards, Disasters & Related TermsWhat are Hazards, Disasters & Related Terms Hazard Taxonomies, Categorization SchemesHazard Taxonomies, Categorization Schemes Theories of DisasterTheories of Disaster Hazards FoundationHazards Foundation Exposure, Risk, Vulnerability Trends, ExplanationsExposure, Risk, Vulnerability Trends, Explanations History of Emergency ManagementHistory of Emergency Management EM Scope, Models, FunctionsEM Scope, Models, Functions Four Phases, CEM, IEMS, Top-Down/Bottom-UpFour Phases, CEM, IEMS, Top-Down/Bottom-Up Roles/Responsibilities of Key PlayersRoles/Responsibilities of Key Players Sustainable Development, Urban Planning & BDRCSustainable Development, Urban Planning & BDRC

22 22 21 st Century EM Core Competencies (Continued) n Tools of the Trade Understanding Legal, Ethical, Social, Economic, Ecological Dimensions of Disaster and Emergency ManagementUnderstanding Legal, Ethical, Social, Economic, Ecological Dimensions of Disaster and Emergency Management Technological Tools, e.g. computers, software, GIS, mapping and modelingTechnological Tools, e.g. computers, software, GIS, mapping and modeling Research, Analysis, Evaluation Tools and MethodsResearch, Analysis, Evaluation Tools and Methods

23 23 Future EM Professional Development Issues n Risk-Based Emergency Mgmt. Foundation n Building Disaster Resilient Communities Focus Social Vulnerability Reduction EmphasisSocial Vulnerability Reduction Emphasis n Recognition n Resistance to Change n Homeland Security Pull Emergency Services Orientation (1 st Responders)Emergency Services Orientation (1 st Responders) Security and Public Safety FocusSecurity and Public Safety Focus

24 24 Importance of Education n “…Although knowledge does not guarantee power over natural catastrophe, it is a prime requisite of disaster prevention.” (Dr. David Alexander, Univ. of Massachusetts, 2000) n “Human History becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe.” (H.G. Wells)


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