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COGNITION, LLC and URBAN PREPAREDNESS, Inc. No Cost and Low Cost Resilience Strategies for Institutions of Higher Education for Institutions of Higher.

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Presentation on theme: "COGNITION, LLC and URBAN PREPAREDNESS, Inc. No Cost and Low Cost Resilience Strategies for Institutions of Higher Education for Institutions of Higher."— Presentation transcript:

1 COGNITION, LLC and URBAN PREPAREDNESS, Inc. No Cost and Low Cost Resilience Strategies for Institutions of Higher Education for Institutions of Higher Education FEMA/EMI Annual Higher Education Conference June Confidential and Proprietary

2 Welcome Housekeeping & Format Introductions – Panel – Participants 2

3 Objectives At the end of this session, participants will: – Have an illustrative historical background of disaster impacts on campuses – Understand some of the challenges and approaches of campuses in moving toward being prepared or disaster resistant – Identify several key issues requiring attention including communication and continuity of operations – Walk away with numerous no cost and low cost strategies that can be implemented on any campus or via an online program that will result in higher levels of preparedness awareness and readiness 3

4 Campus Preparedness Overview Eugene Glover Enterprise Architect Cognition, LLC 4

5 5 Need for Preparedness Ensure Safety of the Campus Population Ensure Quality of Education Processes Interruptions to teaching and research Significant business losses measured by faculty and student departures Drops in research funding, and increases in insurance premiums Recruitment and Sustainment Emergency Response Planning

6 6 Key Challenges to Preparedness Staffing Program development Funding Hierarchy and organizational placement within the institution Myriad of other roles and responsibilities

7 7 'How Safe Is Your Campus?' Survey Results: Universities More than half of university respondents believe their police and/or security officers receive enough training, are paid a fair wage for their duties, and are satisfied with their jobs…leaving a significant minority who indicate challenges in these areas (Gray, 2010).

8 8 'How Safe Is Your Campus?' Survey Results: Universities Nearly half of university respondents (48 percent) say they don't have enough staff (Gray, 2010). Confidential and Proprietary

9 9 'How Safe Is Your Campus?' Survey Results: Universities Although 40 percent of university respondents expected that they would not have as much money or resources to dedicate to safety and security in 2011, only 15 percent expect to have fewer police or security personnel (Gray, 2010). Viewer Confidential and Proprietary

10 10 'How Safe Is Your Campus?' Survey Results: Universities More than four in five (82 percent) of university respondents say their institutions have good relationships with other agencies (Gray, 2010). Viewer Confidential and Proprietary

11 11 Weapons (or the lack of weapons) is a sore spot for nearly half of university respondents. Forty-nine percent say they don't have enough and the right kind of weapons (Gray, 2010). 'How Safe Is Your Campus?' Survey Results: Universities Viewer Confidential and Proprietary

12 12 'How Safe Is Your Campus?' Survey Results: Universities Survey respondents say the recession will continue to impact higher education public safety and security budgets next year. Only 15 percent expected budget increases in 2011 (Gray, 2010). Viewer Confidential and Proprietary

13 13 'How Safe Is Your Campus?' Survey Results: Universities More than a third of higher education survey takers don't believe their departments and institutions could properly respond to an active shooter or active bomber incident (Gray, 2010). Viewer Confidential and Proprietary

14 14 'How Safe Is Your Campus?' Survey Results: Universities A whopping 80 percent of university respondents believe their institution's top administrators understand that safety and security on campus is serious business, but only 48 percent say they have enough money, resources, or personnel (Gray, 2010). Viewer Confidential and Proprietary

15 15 'How Safe Is Your Campus?' Survey Results: Universities When it comes to drug and alcohol abuse, sexual assault, and domestic/relationship violence, nearly three in four survey takers agree strongly or somewhat that their universities have appropriate policies (Gray, 2010). Viewer Confidential and Proprietary

16 16 'How Safe Is Your Campus?' Nearly three in four respondents give high marks to their institutions’ emergency/crisis plans and weather/natural disaster preparedness (Gray, 2010). Survey Results: Universities Confidential and Proprietary

17 17 'How Safe Is Your Campus?' Hazmat incident preparedness is the one emergency management area where a significant minority (29 percent) express some or a lot of concern (Gray, 2010). Survey Results: Universities Viewer Confidential and Proprietary

18 18 Preparation as Perception Visualization Education Participation Practice Advertising Reference: Gray, Robin Hattersley (2010). How safe is your campus? Survey results: Technology. Campus Safety. Yearbook, 2011, p.15.

19 Campus Experience “Leverage, Collaborate and Win” Clint Wallace, USAF (Ret) CEO Cognition, LLC 19Confidential and Proprietary

20 Nationally Applicable “Needs” DP Considerations (Threats, Vulnerabilities, Gaps, Risks, Social Media, Improvement Metrics) DP Requirements (Budget, Plans, Staffing, Resources, Practice, Practice, Practice) DP Support (Buy-in: Students, Admin/Faculty/Staff, Community Partners / Stakeholders) DP Success = Strong Positive Leadership!!! (Educated, Committed, Engaged, Decisive) DP Hind Sight is ALWAYS 20/20 - “If it’s Nobody’s Job … It Doesn’t Get Done!!! Cross-Section Of Visits / Interviews 20Confidential and Proprietary

21 21 Faculty / Staff Campus Experience: Multi-Dimensional Enterprise (Campus Security) Budget RealitiesCommunications Disaster Preparedness Plans / Exercises Cognition, LLC Proprietary Information Students

22 University / College Environment “A Real Balancing Act” -Academia Focus (Multi-disciplines Mixed Emphasis) Curriculum (Relevant, Current, Evolution) Research Interests (Targeted, Value Added) Transition Conduit (Workforce, Greater Good) -Full Time Equivalent (Enrollment Numbers) Student Recruitment (Demographics) Student Retention (2 years / 4 years) Revenue Generators (FTE Offerings) -Competing Priorities (“As Is vs.. To Be”) Academics Programs (Degrees, Certifications, Life Long Learning Training, Accreditation) Housing (Build / Renovate / Physical Plants) New Starts (Projects, Inter-Departmental Competition, Funding) 22Confidential and Proprietary

23 Fiscal Imperatives -Budgetary Constraints (Priorities, Cuts vs.. New Starts, Invest vs.. Spend) Salaries / Facilities / Infrastructure (Physical Plants, Housing, Stadiums) Endowments, Donations, Grants, Full Time Equivalents (FTE) Extra Curricular Activities / Events (Sports, Workshops, Conferences) -Business Climate /Culture (Business Development Construct) Profit and Losses (Operating Cost, Maintenance Cost, Alternative Energy, Taxes) Administration / Faculty / Staff (Salaries, Benefits Packages, Retention, Tenure) Revenue Generation (FTEs, Extra Curricular Activities, Active Solicitations, Fed Funds) 23Confidential and Proprietary

24 Tug of War -Visionary vs. Line- of- Sight Approach (Comprehensive: Board / Administration / Faculty) Board of Directors / Alumni (Policy, Local/ National Clout, Support Systems) Administration / Faculty (Guarded, Optimistic, Opportunistic) Strategic Plan (+5 years: “Where are we Going and How will we get There???”) -Community Influence (Location, Cultural Nuances, Topographic, Climatic ) Public Relations (Attractions, Mutual Benefits) Stakeholder Support (Partnerships/ Sponsors/ Collaborations) Economic Landscape (Business /Industry, Tax Base, Contributors, Projected Growth) 24Confidential and Proprietary

25 Area Needing Attention -Campus Security (Awareness, Mitigation, Mutual Support, Enhancements, Budget Increase) Daily Events (Unauthorized Access, Accidents, Fights, Theft, Fire, Cyber Security) Disaster Preparedness (Plan, Staffing, Resources, Training, Internal Exercises, Connectivity) Catastrophes (Education, Partnerships, Major External Exercise/ Experiment Participation) Feedback / Innovations Portals (Students/ Parents/ Stakeholders/Partners/Community) 25Confidential and Proprietary

26 (HLD) (HLS) = School = Chemical Plant = Airport = HLD HQ = Major Storm System = Sea Port = Military Bases (USAF, USN, USCG) = Tourists The C.A.R.E. CoE = The Perfect Joint Live and Virtual Lab 7. Offshore Oil Riggs 6. High Jack Aircraft 3. Terrorist Plot 2. Hostage 1. Hostile Parent 4. Major Hurricane SCENARIO SAMPLES: 5. Cargo Ship Container = Oil Riggs 26Confidential and Proprietary

27 L.E. Helio Ops. Sheriff Health Dept. Sea Port-USCS Fire Dept. Emerg. Med. Serv.Clergy Air Port-TSA Medical Evac. Corrections Regional Planner Police 911 Call Ctr. Medical Center Emergency Operations Center Center of Excellence for Community Awareness Resilience Enhancements (C.A.R.E.) Advisory Council The Community Awareness Resilience Enhancement (C.A.R.E.) CoE = The Perfect Joint Live and Virtual Lab 27Confidential and Proprietary

28 CoE Nat’l/Regional Partners “Coalition Of the Capable” DOD USNOCOM NG USAF LAB USCG USN LAB DHS Emergency Services DOJ ATTY GEN DJJ DOEd. GCCC Public Safety Div. 911 CALL EOC PORT ATUH CoE Community Awareness & Resilience Enhancements LECORR.FD DOT TSA HD/CSMaritime LOUISIANA STATE UNIV. JACKSON STATE UNIV. BATON ROGUE COMMUNITY COLLEGE BAKERSFIELD COLLEGE 28Confidential and Proprietary

29 National Center Of Excellence = Centers of Excellence = Current State and Local ITAGC Detail Assignees) Projected Partnerships Also Include Ready Campaign, Ad Council, and Citizen Corps (All Connected Via E-Learning) NATIONAL CENTER OF EXCELLENCE Community Awareness Resilience Enhancements (C.A.R.E.) (FEMA Regional and Community College Alignment) 29

30 Campus Experience Summary: “Leverage, Collaborate, Win!” National, Regional, State /Local (Policies, Plans, Programs, Mutual Aid Agreements, Funding) DHS ‘Centers of Excellence / FEMA EMI (Research, Best Practices, Innovations, Partnerships) Social Media (Creative Uses, Mitigate Negative Impacts, Solicit Student Inputs) Notification Processes (Current Infrastructure, Proven Enhancements, Decision Support) Exercises Imperative (Realistic Scenarios/Vignettes, Mutual Efforts, Metrics/Feedback) EOC/911 Call Centers Capabilities (Campus-wide, Local Community, Live/Virtual/Sim Exercises) Recent “Real World” Lessons Learned ( Man-made/Natural: Events, Disasters, Catastrophes) Strong Positive Leadership!!! (Educated, Committed, Engaged, Decisive) DP Hind Sight is ALWAYS 20/20 - “If it’s Nobody’s Job … It Doesn’t Get Done!!! 30Confidential and Proprietary

31 Charles Snead, USAF (Ret) Chief Technology Officer Cognition, LLC 31

32 32 What is Enterprise Modeling (EM) EM consists of people, processes and a toolset –Employs object-modeling techniques to allow for analysis of complex problems –Facilitates both horizontal and vertical communication, internal and external to the programmatics EM toolset includes innovative modeling software Allows visualization and understanding of complex systems –Operational systems (911 call centers, 2000) –Business systems (organization, workflow and information) –Knowledge management systems (documents, events, tasks, issues, contacts) –IT systems (hardware, software and interfaces) –Biological systems (structure, function and behavior) Employs a schema-less database Supports construction of object models Provides XML interoperability Allows for multiple visualization avenues –Lists, tables, trees, images, diagrams, narrative, web pages and forms Extensible capability through web forms and web pages Extensible data model

33 What is the proposed approach? Collect information –Comprehensive discovery and objective investigation of all sources –Vendors, emergency managers, first responders, emergency support functions, users, trainers Combine the information to construct a model –Every datum is an architectural element, exhibiting type characteristics –Every datum resides within a context, associated with other elements Analyze the information, synthesize conclusions and summarize findings in operational language Provide recommendations to support developmental, programmatic and emergency management operations / decision making –Satisfaction of operational need and relevance –Migration paths and associated strategies 33

34 What needs to be done? Determine the true capability of the baselines and variants –In objective, macro-level, unambiguous language. Provide a basis for comparative analysis of multiple risk events, organizations, technology and training programs –Determine commonality, redundancy, variability and consistency in implementation. Provide a basis for the evaluation of other (not capability-related) attributes and properties of emergency management / disaster preparedness components: –Effectiveness (fitness of purpose) –Utilization, extent of usage –Suitability for re-use –Stability (degree of change over time) –Performance Provide a mechanism for the evaluation of candidate best practices, standards and interoperability to determine suitability. 34

35 What is different about this approach? Unbiased –Proponents of this approach do not produce, advocate or sponsor products, software or tools. Simple –This approach employs innovative means to manage complexity, promote shared awareness among the teams and managers, and visibility for users and stakeholders. –The methodology facilitates a common understanding of the problem and uses simple, well-understood, validated and authoritative processes to achieve incremental solution results. Adaptable and Extensible –Tools and processes are expandable and change-friendly, allowing multiple mechanisms for expansion of tool capability, tool utilization and process improvement to accommodate new requirements as they inevitably emerge. 35

36 EMI Domain Model 36

37 Disaster Preparedness Planning Cycle 37

38 Mobilization 38

39 Response 39

40 Response Planning Cycle 40

41 Situation Awareness 41

42 De-mobilization Planning 42Confidential and Proprietary

43 No Cost & Low Cost Strategies Blythe Joy Patenaude, MBA President Urban Preparedness, Inc. 43

44 No-Cost Strategy #1: Student Education Participate in New Student Orientation programs each semester providing preparedness basics: – What is Emergency Preparedness and three things all students need to know: Pack, Plan, Practice Pack a 3 day kit – keep a case of water under your bed, PB, Jelly, crackers, etc. in “critter-proof” containers (dorm/apartment, car, backpack). Phone numbers and medication are critical. Plan alternate housing, evacuation routes, communication. Professors should give instructions for evacuations on the first day of class. Practice class room evacuations and participate in exercises/drills – Discuss Emergency Preparedness Plan and where to find it on the school’s web site – IMOK protocols for parents, dorm counselors/roommates Confidential and Proprietary 44

45 No Cost Strategy #2 Faculty Education Participate in Faculty Orientation. Ask the Provost if you can provide some emergency preparedness guidance to professors. Emergency preparedness basics: – What is Emergency Preparedness and three things all faculty need to know: Pack, Plan, Practice Pack a 3 day kit – keep a case of water and some basic food items in your office in “critter-proof” containers (office, car, backpack). Phone numbers and medication are critical if you have to shelter-in-place. Plan alternate housing, evacuation routes, communication. Professors should give instructions for evacuations on the first day of class. Inform students that in the event of a building evacuation, they are required to meet you at an identified location outside of the building and check in with you before taking off. Students who do not check in will be assumed to be in the building and missing and unaccounted for. Professors are to assume that all fire drills are actual events and should evacuation immediately. Practice class room evacuations and participate in exercises/drills – Discuss Emergency Preparedness Plan and where to find it on the school’s web site – IMOK protocols for spouse, partner, children, provost. Office essentials – identify “must take” items in event of an evacuation (discs, grades, research). Put in one place to grab, inform assistant, or consider keeping in special safe. Suggestions? Confidential and Proprietary 45

46 No Cost Strategy #3 University Staff Education Participate in all Orientation Programs for New Employees sponsored by Human Capital Mgt. Indicate where Emergency Plan is on website. Urge to be clear about what unit protocols are for emergencies. Provide Preparedness Basics (Pack, Plan, Practice) Identify “Essential Personnel” and support efforts to help them prepare their families so they can attend to their university responsibilities. A prepared family with a Plan means that your employees are likely to stay on site. Confidential and Proprietary 46

47 No Cost Strategy #4 Increase Support Develop C-CERT teams by school (students, faculty, staff) Develop C-CERT teams by dormitory (floor counselors) Develop C-CERT teams by organization (SGA, Greeks, others) Involve building engineers in C-CERT protocols Initiate a Medical Reserve Corps unit (medicine, nursing, allied health, dentistry, pharmacy, social work) Network with ROTC Confidential and Proprietary 47

48 No Cost Strategy #5 Business Continuity of Operations Provide an Internship opportunity in the office of Risk Management or develop an Independent Studies task for students to help educate identified and cooperating/ collaborative units on campus. Explore an opportunity to work with the School of Business in developing a course or workshop exposing students/faculty/staff to COOP principles. Confidential and Proprietary 48

49 No Cost Strategy #6 Stress Resilience Managing stress is an important skill that most college students need to learn. Conduct Stress Resilience workshops for students (faculty/staff) on how to identify symptoms of stress, how to manage it, and how to prevent stress from managing them. Consider using a stress inventory worksheet (see handout) Involve the Student Health Center or other mental health professionals Train professors on how to deal with PTSD episodes in the classroom, who to contact if they suspect that a student is in crisis, and other university-identified concerns Provide confidential reporting mechanism for students Confidential and Proprietary 49

50 No Cost Strategy #7 Divide and Conquer Students wishing to obtain credit for Independent Studies could select a school or university unit, develop a preparedness plan and work with their supervisor (Dean, Campus Safety Chief, etc.) to implement the plan, or a portion of it. Final papers should include addressing areas of denial, resistance, support, and a recommendations for Next Steps --- which could be followed-up by the next student. Confidential and Proprietary 50

51 No Cost Strategy #8 September is National Preparedness Month Decide on at least one event to host during the month promoting emergency preparedness education Conduct one exercise or fire drill. Contact SafeAmerica to let them know your college or university participated in the Drill Down to Safety initiative and give them a numbers count. Use this as a vehicle for public relations and public education. Conduct a Preparedness Fair Review the hand out and select other activities Confidential and Proprietary 51

52 No Cost Strategy #9 Conduct a SWOT Test of Your Campus This could be a class project or a group project for several students as an elective or independent studies project. Make this a collaborative effort providing “free” help to the university’s President, Campus Safety/Security Chief, Emergency Manager, Director of Residence Life, Facilities Manager, and others Conduct Needs Assessments and offer concrete solutions. Maintain strict confidentiality of all information/materials Consider seeking outside funding Confidential and Proprietary 52

53 No Cost Strategy #10 Notification is Not Enough Reference: EMI All-Hazards for Universities and Colleges Utilize IMOK strategies to minimize parent calls and to maximize immediate identification of safe students Encourage utilization of identified APPS Communicate protocols to parents and encourage cooperation and communication of emergency plans Confidential and Proprietary 53

54 Questions? 54Confidential and Proprietary

55 Contact Us: Blythe Joy Patenaude, President Urban Preparedness (202) Clint Wallace, CEO Cognition LLC (850) Gene Glover, Enterprise Architect Cognition LLC (703) Charles Snead, CTO Cognition LLC (703) Confidential and Proprietary55


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