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Emergency Management in the 21 st Century: Living in the New Normal The US, New Zealand and the World February 16, 2005.

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Presentation on theme: "Emergency Management in the 21 st Century: Living in the New Normal The US, New Zealand and the World February 16, 2005."— Presentation transcript:

1 Emergency Management in the 21 st Century: Living in the New Normal The US, New Zealand and the World February 16, 2005

2 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation Changes Over the Last Ten Years Civil defense to domestic response Losses continue to grow We tend to be best prepared for past disasters 25% of the deaths and 50% of injuries occur in things we don’t call disasters, like fog and lightning More people die from heat than from earthquakes

3 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation Professional Changes Over Ten Years National security to homeland security Professional specialization in FEMA / EM Building the profession Higher education in emergency management – 1 to 120 Emphasis on hazard mitigation and sustainable development Preparedness is the foundation of EM

4 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation Continued Progress Certifications – CEM, IAEM Evolution of standards CAR NFPA 1600 EMAP Books increasing; journals increasing; need more research Information flow speeded by internet and advanced technologies ®

5 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation More Progress Virtual operations centers, created by EDS Emphasis on response has given way to emphasis on preparedness and mitigation Homeland Security has added prevention Global outreach to underserved communities, disabled, seniors, minorities, tribes, colleges and universities, schools

6 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation Current Status The disaster business keeps booming! 1990 thru 1999 – FEMA spent $27 billion 50 times more than 1950 thru 1959 $10 per person for disaster relief Insurance losses are running $40 billion per year, five times the 1950’s level 76% of the trillion dollars of loss over 15 years is weather-related – climate change?

7 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation 2004’s Worst Natural Disasters $600 billionEarthquake / tsunami in Southeast Asia / Eastern Africa $600 billion $21 billionFlorida hurricanes: Charley, Francis, Gaston and “The Gang” $21 billion Floods and landslides in the Philippines Drought in South Africa

8 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation 2004’s Worst Natural Disasters (continued) $200 million; $70 million indemnificationFlood North Island of New Zealand $200 million; $70 million indemnification $350 millionTropical cyclone in Brazil $350 million $5 billionFloods in Bangladesh, Nepal, and India triggered by monsoon rains $5 billion $30 millionEarthquake in Japan $30 million

9 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation 2004’s Worst Natural Disasters (continued) Floods in Botswana and surrounding countries $400 millionEarthquake in Morocco $400 million Finally, a separate word about the tsunami, which has taken almost 300,000 lives, including those who are still missing: –Need for warning system – US spending $37.5 million to set up a deep-sea warning system around its coastline –International Tsunami Center reports not “if”, but “when”

10 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation Weather Challenges Vulnerable coastline Flood-prone rivers and streams Busiest tornado corridor in the world – expanding and intensifying Climate change and biodiversity risks Other drivers in the disaster boom: –Political generosity –Lax FEMA regulations –Unprecedented development along coasts and in floodplains

11 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation Mitigation Measures Restoring forests Flood and erosion control Protecting watersheds Promoting other risk mitigation activities Eradication of poverty Environmental conservation Sustainability development Wider availability of disaster insurance

12 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation Structural Challenges in the US Budget cuts Demotion of FEMA Preparedness grant distribution and emergency management in two different DHS organizations All hazards vs. one hazard Cutting and capping Emergency Management Performance Grants (EMPG)

13 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation The Next Ten Years: Crystal Ball Time More colleges and universities offering certificates and degrees, eventually all will have some courses in emergency management More online programs; perfect fit for our profession Great need for faculty

14 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation The Next Ten Years (continued) Technology will play an increasing role – simulations for exercises, video conferences Enterprise Virtual Operations Center (EVOC) developed by EDS in the US for monitoring, response, exercises More press attention to disasters and emergency personnel; will become issue in campaigns More job descriptions will include degrees and certifications Virtual Operations Center

15 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation More Crystal Ball Standards compliance will be part of funding process NRP / NIMS / NFPA 1600 / EMAP New presidential executive order on national preparedness standards – comment period New intelligence reform law

16 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation The Future Foreseen Extension of assessments Tribal communities Local governments Private sector – Sarbanes Oxley and NFPA 1600 Law suits – not hiring CEM, degree holders, and not meeting standards ®

17 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation Make a Wish More funding Higher salaries More collaboration More information sharing More interoperability All hazards approach Becoming the first choice profession for young people

18 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation Emphasis Always On the Positive Side More books More manuals More case studies More best practices shared More lessons learned shared More chances like today to share challenges and support each other

19 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation Final Recommendations Take a global perspective Take a holistic look Adhere to the all hazards approach Accept responsibility for disasters because we can make decisions affecting them, not just Acts of God Need a country-by-country risk assessment Need a national database on disasters, so that we know what we are losing… …and what we are spending

20 Use or disclosure of data on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the title page of this presentation Final Recommendations (continued) Comprehensive education and training from kindergarten through PhD Share lessons learned and best practices more broadly Many developing countries may know better how to relate to nature

21 Kay C. Goss, CEM Senior Advisor for Homeland Security, Emergency Management, and Business Continuity Electronic Data Systems Corporation (EDS) ®


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