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Figure 12-01 Lima, Peru has been one of Latin Americas largest and most influential administrative centers since the early colonial era. Credit: Charles.

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Presentation on theme: "Figure 12-01 Lima, Peru has been one of Latin Americas largest and most influential administrative centers since the early colonial era. Credit: Charles."— Presentation transcript:

1 Figure 12-01 Lima, Peru has been one of Latin Americas largest and most influential administrative centers since the early colonial era. Credit: Charles M. Nissly

2 Figure 12-02 Havana, Cuba has functioned since its founding as one of Latin Americas leading commercial cities. Credit: Charles M. Nissly

3 Figure 12-03 Quito, Ecuador has acted as a regional industrial center throughout its history. Credit: David L. Clawson

4 Figure 12-04 The central plaza and kiosk of Heredia, Costa Rica. Credit: David L. Clawson

5 Figure 12-05 The zócalo of Córdoba, Mexico. Note the number of people using the plaza for social and recreational purposes in both Cordoba and Heredia. Credit:

6 Figure 12-06 Most Latin American cities are characterized by extremely narrow streets and a heavy reliance on buses for public transportation. This scene is from Cayambe, Ecuador. Credit: Charles M. Nissly

7 Figure 12-07 A Mérida, Yucatán street scene. Credit: David L. Clawson

8 Figure 12-08 An inner city apartment building, or vecindad, in Puebla, Mexico. Note the absence of yards between the buildings and the streets. Credit: David L. Clawson

9 Figure 12-09 The roofs of many homes in Latin America are flat and constitute extensions of work and living space of lower levels. It is not unusual for maids and other servants to live in tiny quarters built on the roof of an upper class home. This scene is from Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Credit: David L. Clawson

10 Figure 12-10 Another feature common to many homes and business in Latin America is barred windows. Credit: David L. Clawson

11 Figure 12-11 Razor wire placed upon the top of walls and roofs is another means of deterring unauthorized entry. This photo was taken in San Salvador, El Salvador. Credit: David L. Clawson

12 Figure 12-12 Yet another means of discouraging intruders is the placement of pieces of broken class in drying mortar laid upon the top of walls dividing one property from another. Credit: David L. Clawson

13 Figure 12-13 Peasant villages act as part-cultures, combining elements of the traditional past and the modern present. Seen in this image is the village of San Buenaventure Nealtican in the state of Puebla, Mexico. It is located about an hour by bus from the large metropolitan center of Puebla. Credit: David L. Clawson

14 Figure 12-14 The modest zócalo of San Buenaventura Nealtican. Credit: David L. Clawson

15 Figure 12-15 The all-purpose building of Nealtican, which serves as a tiny store, the community post office and, in the back, as a family residence. The building fronts the zócalo. Credit: David L. Clawson

16 Figure 12-16 Nealtican women, with young children nearby, washing clothes by hand in an irrigation ditch. Credit: David L. Clawson

17 Figure 12-17 Contrast the preceding scenes of Nealtican with the Paseo de la Reforma, the modern urban spine of Mexico City. Credit: David L. Clawson

18 Figure 12-18 Mexico Citys subway systems transports millions of passengers daily. Credit: David L. Clawson

19 Figure 12-19 A family residing in an inner city apartment in Veracruz, Mexico. Note the exposed electrical wiring and the crowded conditions. Credit: David L. Clawson

20 Figure 12-20 The leaders of many Latin American cities have attempted in recent years to renovate historic districts. This scene is of the Casco Viejo area of Panama City, Panama. Credit: David L. Clawson

21 Figure 12-21 A zone of in-situ accretion in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Credit: David L. Clawson

22 Figure 12-22 Shanties built over filthy water, Manaus, Brazil. Credit: Charles M. Nissly

23 Figure 12-23 A migrant shanty along the Pan American Highway north of Quito, Ecuador. Credit: David L. Clawson

24 Figure 12-24 A squatter settlement in San Salvador, El Salvaor. Credit: David L. Clawson

25 Figure 12-25 A child living in a squatter settlement in San José, Costa Rica. Credit: David L. Clawson

26 Figure 12-26 Brasília, Brazil is the best known of Latin Americas planned new cities. Credit: Charles M. Nissly

27 Figure 12-27 Belmopan, Belize is another example of a new, planned administrative city. Credit: David L. Clawson

28 Figure 12-28 A Japanese agricultural colony near Rio Branco in Amazonian Brazil, near the border with Bolivia. Credit: Charles M. Nissly


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