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Air Power in World War I Chapter 2, Lesson 3 World War I.

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Presentation on theme: "Air Power in World War I Chapter 2, Lesson 3 World War I."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Air Power in World War I

3 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 World War I

4 Chapter 2, Lesson 3

5 Elf Performers  ELF 1: MEGAN CLAWSON  ELF 2: RAOUL GAUBY  ELF 3: JAMI SCHROEDER  ELF 4: TYLER SCOTT  ELF 5: SGT T Chapter 2, Lesson 3

6 WWI Performers  Archduke Franz Ferdinand  Missus Ferdinand  Serbia  Austria-Hungary  Russia  Germany  Belgium  France  England Chapter 2, Lesson 3

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8  Archduke Franz Ferdinand enters with wife what’s her name (probably Missus Duke Ferdi)  Archduke: “Hi everybody…(wave to crowd)…I am here with my ugly…oh…I mean my lovely wife to make all you fine Serbians my Servants” Chapter 2, Lesson 3

9  Enter Serbian Nationalist with weapon  Serbian Nationalist: “I will be a servant to nobody you south end of a north bound donkey female reproductive organ Arch- Dukey with your ugly…oh I mean Lovely wife. Oh and by the way what kind of name is Franz…did your mother not like you? I will now kill you…kill you dead and your ugly…oh I mean lovely wife.” Chapter 2, Lesson 3

10  Serbian Nationalist kills Archduke and his ugly…oh I mean lovely wife  Archduke and ugly…oh I mean lovely wife lay down and die Chapter 2, Lesson 3

11  Enter Austria Hungary  Austria-Hungary Looks at dead people and says: “Heyyyyyyy!!! Who killed the Duke and his ugly…oh I mean lovely wife?”  Serbian Nationalist: “It was I you scurvy swine poor excuse for a country” Chapter 2, Lesson 3

12  Austria-Hungary: “Well that makes me very angry and I shall make war with you…for you are very small like (name a small cadet here) and I will spank you until you cry”  Serbian Nationalist: “Bring it on tough guy I am afraid of nobody except (name that small cadet here)” Chapter 2, Lesson 3

13  Enter Russia: Russian say to Austria- Hungary: “Hey Austria-rearwipe- Hungary…Serbia is my friend…I have an alliance with them (wink wink)…and if you touch them I will bring my big burly hairy women across the border to play footsie with your men as we kick your bleeps” Chapter 2, Lesson 3

14  Austria-Hungary to Russia: “Game on flabby lips…you can join your mini- serbs as my servants” Oh..I will also bring my little friend Hun and his cast of girly men wearing tights from Germany for they have allianced (wink wink) with me” Chapter 2, Lesson 3

15  Enter Germany: Stand beside Austria- Hungary: give a high-five:  Germany says: “OH YEAH!!! GIVE ME SOME OF THAT SWEET SERB”  Enter Belgium: “Hey everybody whazzupppp?”  Germany says to Belgium: “Shut your pie-hole Belgi…Nobody likes you” Chapter 2, Lesson 3

16  Belgium says to Germany: “That’s mean…just wait until my Frenchy Friends hear what you said…they will say they are going to make war with you but they won’t cause they really aren’t fighters…they are lovers…you know with the French kiss thing going on.” Chapter 2, Lesson 3

17  Enter France: Stand beside Belgium: give a high-five: “OH YEAH!!! GIVE ME SOME OF THAT GERMAN CAKE…THAT WILL GO GOOD WITH MY WINE AND I’LL INVITE MY FUNNY TALKING FRIEND FROM THE NORTH BLIMEY AND HIS CAST OF BLOKES…THEY NEVER MISS A GOOD BUTT WOOPING.” Chapter 2, Lesson 3

18  Enter England: Stand beside France: “OH YEAH!!! I’ll TAKE AN ORDER OF GERMAN CHOCOLATE AND THROW A FEW OF THOSE AUSSIE- HUNGARY MILK-MAIDS ON THE SIDE”  All face-off and make mean gestures then leave the scene. Chapter 2, Lesson 3

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21 Pre-WW I Alliances Chapter 2, Lesson 3

22 OverviewOverview  The contributions of US pilots during World War I  The role of air power during World War I  How air power expanded during World War I

23 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 Quick Write Faced with seven German planes against his one, Eddie Rickenbacker knew he must remain calm. Why do you think that was important? What lesson do you think you can learn for use in emergencies you might face?

24 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 World War I  Most World War I battles were fought on land or at sea  Airplanes were still fragile when the war started in 1914  But during the war, aviation engineers made tremendous advances

25 World War I begins in Europe Chapter 2, Lesson 3

26 Outbreak of WWI  Because of alliances among different nations in Europe, one country after another soon declared war  Soon the Allies were at war against the Central Powers The AlliesThe Central Powers Russia Germany France Austria-Hungary Serbia Turkey Britain

27 WW I BATTLE MAP Chapter 2, Lesson 3

28 The War Comes to the United StatesThe War Comes to the United States (06:02) The War Comes to the United States The War Comes to the United StatesThe War Comes to the United States (06:02) The War Comes to the United States Chapter 2, Lesson 3

29 The US Enters the War  US President Woodrow Wilson vowed that the United States would remain neutral  But over time, that proved impossible  German U-boats targeted all American ships headed toward Britain  Germany also made a secret deal with Mexico  The United States declared war on Germany and entered World War I in April 1917

30 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 Aircraft in War  In a few key instances, aircraft contributed to the Allied victory  Aircraft had important functions— from doing aerial reconnaissance to shooting down enemy aircraft

31 The Lafayette Escadrille Chapter 2, Lesson 3

32 The Lafayette Escadrille  Some American pilots didn’t wait for the United States to join the war  The French Foreign Legion could sign up these volunteers  In April 1916 seven American pilots formed a fighting group called Escadrille Américaine  They had to change the name to the Lafayette Escadrille  By the time the United States Air Service brought the unit under its supervision in 1918, its pilots had made 199 kills

33 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 Raoul Lufbery  Raoul Lufbery was the most famous pilot of the Lafayette Escadrille  He had 17 combat victories during the war  He died in action when his plane became engulfed in flames after being shot by a German aircraft Courtesy of the U.S. Air Force

34 Movie: Flyboys Chapter 2, Lesson 3

35 Edward Rickenbacker Courtesy of Bettman/Corbis

36 Edward Rickenbacker Chapter 2, Lesson 3

37 Edward Rickenbacker Chapter 2, Lesson 3

38 People of the DecadePeople of the Decade (02:31) People of the Decade People of the DecadePeople of the Decade (02:31) People of the Decade Chapter 2, Lesson 3

39 Edward Rickenbacker  America’s ace of aces started out as a professional racecar driver  Col William (“Billy”) Mitchell helped Rickenbacker become a pilot  Rickenbacker rose from an enlisted Soldier to the rank of captain and took command of the 94th Squadron

40 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 Frank Luke  As soon as the US entered the war, Frank Luke joined the Army Signal Corps  Luke sometimes went off by himself to look for German aircraft even though he risked court-martial  Luke’s career as a combat pilot was short: he died just 17 days after his first kill  In that time, he shot down 15 balloons and three airplanes

41 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 Eugene Bullard  Bullard was the only African- American to serve as a pilot during World War I  Bullard signed up with the French Foreign Legion in October 1914  He tried to join the US Air Service, but the Army turned him down  He shot down two German aircraft while in the French Air Service Courtesy of the U.S. Air Force

42 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 StalemateStalemate  By 1917, the war in Europe was at a stalemate stalemate  A stalemate is a situation in which further action is blocked  A force was needed to tip the balance one way or the other  The Allies hoped that force would be the United States, which joined the effort in April

43 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 US Involvement  In August 1917 the US Congress vowed to “darken the skies over Europe with US aircraft”  Congress had good intentions, but it had made an empty promise  While the United States never built more than a handful of airplanes during the war years, it did provide considerable manpower in the air

44 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 The Role of Aircraft  Until WWI, most people thought the role of aircraft in combat was limited to aerial reconnaissance  Dropping bombs from the sky seemed an unlikely idea  Conducting battles between squadrons of planes also seemed far-fetched

45 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 Reshaping War  The airplane reshaped the way countries fight wars more quickly than any other weapon in military history  A motto emerged by war’s end: “If you control the air, you cannot be beaten; if you lose the air, you cannot win”

46 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 The Long-Range Raid  London, 1915: German airships floated over the city and dropped bombs  Through 1917 the Germans worked on perfecting these long-range strategic raids  Strategic  Strategic means designed to strike at the sources of an enemy’s military, economic, or political power

47 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 German Airship Courtesy of the Library of Congress

48 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 The Machine Gun  Another WWI innovation was the airplane- mounted machine gun  French pilot Roland Garros was the first to bolt an automatic rifle to his plane  The Germans asked Dutchman Anthony Fokker to improve it—he built an interrupting gear  But soon the Allies and the Central Powers were again on equal footing dogfight  The famous dogfights commenced—a dogfight is a battle between fighter planes

49 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 The Battle of Saint Mihiel  September 1918: Air power played a tremendous role in this offensive  Billy Mitchell commanded nearly 1,500 Allied airplanes  The Allied pilots had two goals:  To destroy German planes in the air  To destroy German aircraft in hangars on the ground  The Battle of Saint Mihiel helped lead to Allied victory two months later

50 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 How the Airplane Revolutionized War How the Airplane Revolutionized War  During WWI both sides sent up airplanes to shoot down observation aircraft  Each side had to protect its observation aircraft  Aerial combat was born  Once machine guns were mounted on planes, pilots could use them to strafe soldiers on the ground strafe  To strafe is to attack with a machine gun from a low-flying aircraft

51 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 Challenging Old Strategies  Airplanes now offered possibilities that challenged age-old warfare strategies  In traditional battles, troops dug trenches and assaults were from the front  But airplanes could fly over an enemy’s trenches and bomb from overhead  They could also hit important targets behind enemy lines, such as factories

52 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 Necessity Is the Mother of Invention  The technology of the Allied and Central Powers’ air power would leapfrog one over the other:  Speeds picked up  Aircraft became stronger and sturdier  Maximum altitudes climbed from 10,000 feet to 24,000 feet

53 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 New Developments in Aviation New Developments in Aviation  Once war broke out, the pace of invention picked up  By 1918 three specialized types of aircraft had emerged:  The fighter  The observation aircraft  The bomber Courtesy of the U.S. Air Force Sopwith Camel Most Successful Fighter Plane of World War I

54 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 FightersFighters  The fighter came into its own with the birth of the dogfight  These fighter aircraft needed three qualities: they had to be lightweight, fast, and maneuverable  By early 1918 fighters zipped along at a cool 130 mph

55 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 Why War Sped Up US Aviation Development  Congress appropriated $64 million for airplanes in 1917  At that time the United States was far behind other nations in air power  Curtiss Aircraft was the only aviation manufacturer in the country

56 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 Future of Aviation  Army staff officers still had their eyes focused on the infantry  They had no plans for their aviation section  But Brig Gen Billy Mitchell believed strongly in the future of aviation as an instrument in warfare  Today’s US Air Force still considers Mitchell one of its founding fathers Courtesy of the U.S. Air Force

57 World War I Comes to an EndWorld War I Comes to an End (03:35) World War I Comes to an End World War I Comes to an EndWorld War I Comes to an End (03:35) World War I Comes to an End Chapter 2, Lesson 3

58 ReviewReview  During World War I, aircraft had important functions—from doing aerial reconnaissance to shooting down enemy aircraft  Four American pilots who made significant contributions in World War I were Raoul Lufbery, Eddie Rickenbacker, Frank Luke, and Eugene Bullard  While the United States never built more than a handful of airplanes during the war years, it did provide considerable manpower in the air

59 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 ReviewReview  The airplane reshaped the way countries fight wars more quickly than any other weapon in military history  Another WWI innovation was the airplane-mounted machine gun  The Germans asked Dutchman Anthony Fokker to improve it—he built an interrupting gear

60 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 ReviewReview  During World War I, airplanes offered possibilities that challenged age-old warfare strategies  By 1918 three specialized types of aircraft had emerged: the fighter, the observation aircraft, and the bomber  Billy Mitchell believed strongly in the future of aviation as an instrument in warfare

61 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 SummarySummary  The contributions of US pilots during World War I  The role of air power during World War I  How air power expanded during World War I

62 Chapter 2, Lesson 3 Next….Next….  Done—air power in World War I  Next—the barnstormers Courtesy of the U.S. Air Force


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