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Copyright 2005 USC1 US Builders Group 10 Hour OSHA Training Instructor: James Kihn.

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Presentation on theme: "Copyright 2005 USC1 US Builders Group 10 Hour OSHA Training Instructor: James Kihn."— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright 2005 USC1 US Builders Group 10 Hour OSHA Training Instructor: James Kihn

2 Copyright 2005 USC2

3 3 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act

4 Copyright 2005 USC4 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act To assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women; by authorizing enforcement of the standards developed under the Act; by assisting and encouraging the States in their efforts to assure safe and healthful working conditions; by providing for research, information, education, and training in the field of occupational safety and health; and for other purposes.

5 Copyright 2005 USC5 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS AND PURPOSE SEC. (2) Congress finds that personal injuries and illnesses arising out of work situations impose a substantial burden upon, and are a hindrance to, interstate commerce in terms of lost production, wage loss, medical expenses, and disability compensation payments.

6 Copyright 2005 USC6 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS AND PURPOSE (b) The congress declares it to be its purpose and policy through the exercise of its powers to regulate commerce among the several States and with foreign nations and to provide for the general welfare, to assure so far as possible every working man and women in the Nation safe and healthful working conditions and to preserve our human resources

7 Copyright 2005 USC7 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act DUTIES SEC 5. (a) Each employer (1) shall furnish to each of his employees employment and a place of employment which are free from recognized hazards that are causing or are likely to be caused death or serious physical harm to his employees. (2) shall comply with occupational safety and health standards promulgated under this Act.

8 Copyright 2005 USC8 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act DUTIES (b) Each employee shall comply with occupational safety and health standards and all rules, regulations, and orders issued pursuant to this Act which are applicable to his own actions and conduct.

9 Copyright 2005 USC9 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act INSPECTIONS, INVESTIGATIONS AND RECORDKEEPING SEC. 8. (a) In order to carry out the purpose of this Act, the Secretary, upon presenting appropriate credentials to the owner, operator, or agent in charge, is authorized (1) to enter without delay and at reasonable times any factory, plant, establishment, construction site, or other area, workplace or environment where work is performed by an employee of an employer; and

10 Copyright 2005 USC10 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act INSPECTIONS, INVESTIGATIONS AND RECORDKEEPING (2) to inspect and investigate during regular working hours and at other reasonable times, and within reasonable limits and in a reasonable manner, any such place of employment and all pertinent conditions, structures, machines, apparatus, devices, equipment, and materials therein, and to question privately any such employer, owner, operator, agent or employee.

11 Copyright 2005 USC11 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act CITATIONS SEC. 9. (b) Each citation issued under this section, or a copy or copies thereof, shall be prominently posted, as prescribed in regulations issued by the Secretary, at or near each place a violation referred to in the citation occurred. (b) No citation may be issued under this section after the expiration of six months following the occurrence of any violation.

12 Copyright 2005 USC12 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act JUDICIAL REVIEW SEC. 11. (c)(1) No person shall discharge or in any manner discriminate against any employee because such employee has filed any complaint or instituted or caused to be instituted any proceeding under or related to this Act or has testified or is about to testify in any such proceeding or because of the exercise by such employee on behalf of himself or others of any right afforded by this Act.

13 Copyright 2005 USC13 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act PENALTIES SEC. 17. (a) Any employer who willfully or repeatedly violates the requirements of section 5 of this Act, any standard, rule, or order promulgated pursuant to section 6 of this Act, or regulations prescribed pursuant to this Act, may be assessed a civil penalty of not more than $70,000 for each violation, but not less than $5,000 for each willful violation.

14 Copyright 2005 USC14 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act PENALTIES (b) Any employer who has received a citation for a serious violation of the requirements of section 5 of this Act, of any standard, rule, or order promulgated pursuant to section 6 of this Act, or of any regulations prescribed pursuant to this Act, shall be assessed a civil penalty of up to $7,000 for each such violation.

15 Copyright 2005 USC15 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act PENALTIES (c) Any employer who has received a citation for a violation of the requirements of section 5 of this Act, of any standard, rule, or order promulgated pursuant to section 6 of this Act, or of regulations prescribed pursuant to this Act, and such violation is specifically determined not to be of a serious nature, may be assessed a civil penalty of up to $7,000 for each such violation.

16 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act PENALTIES (d) Any employer who fails to correct a violation for which a citation has been issued under section 9(a) within the period permitted for its correction (which period shall not begin to run until the date of the final order of the Commission in the case of any review proceeding under section 10 initiated by the employer in good faith and not solely for delay or avoidance of penalties), may be assessed a civil penalty of not more than $7,000 for each day during which such failure or violation continues.

17 17 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act PENALTIES (e) Any employer who willfully violates any standard, rule, or order promulgated pursuant to section 6 of this Act, or of any regulations prescribed pursuant to this Act, and that violation caused death to any employee, shall upon conviction, be punished by a fine of not more than $10,000 or by imprisonment for not more than six months, or by both; except that if the conviction is for a violation committed after a first conviction of such person, punishment shall be by a fine of not more than $20,000 or by imprisonment for not more than one year, or by both.

18 Copyright 2005 USC18 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act PENALTIES (f) Any person who gives advance notice of any inspection to be conducted under this Act, without authority from the Secretary or his designees shall upon conviction under this Act, without authority from the Secretary or his designees shall upon conviction, be punished by a fine of not more than $1,000 or by imprisonment for not more than six months, or by both

19 Copyright 2005 USC19 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act PENALTIES (g) Whoever knowingly makes any false statement, representation, or certification in any application, record, report, plan, or other document filed or required to be maintained pursuant to this Act shall, upon conviction be punished by a fine of not more than $10,000, or by imprisonment for not more than six months, or by both.

20 Copyright 2005 USC20 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act PENALTIES (i) Any employer who violates any of the posting requirements, as prescribed under the provisions of this Act, shall be assessed a civil penalty of up to $7,000 for each violation.

21 Copyright 2005 USC21 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act PENALTIES (l) Civil penalties owed under this Act shall be paid to the Secretary for deposit into the Treasury of the United States and shall accrue to the United States……………

22 Copyright 2005 USC22 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION An Act EFFECTIVE DATE SEC. 34. This Act shall take effect one hundred and twenty days after the date of its enactment. Approved December 29, 1970 Amended November 5, 1990

23 Copyright 2005 USC23

24 Copyright 2005 USC24 1926.20(b) Accident prevention responsibilities. (1) It shall be the responsibility of the employer to initiate and maintain such programs as may be necessary to comply with this part. 1926.20(b)(2) Such programs shall provide for frequent and regular inspections of the job sites, materials, and equipment to be made by competent persons designated by the employers. Subpart C General Safety and Health Provisions 1926.20 General safety and health provisions OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION OSHA

25 25 OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION Subpart C General Safety and Health Provisions 1926.20 General safety and health provisions 1926.20(b)(3) The use of any machinery, tool, material or equipment which is not in compliance with any applicable requirement of this part is prohibited. Such machine, tool, or equipment shall either be identified as unsafe by tagging or locking the controls to render them inoperable or shall be physically removed from its place of operation. 1926.20(b)(4) The employer shall permit only those employees qualified by training or experience to operate equipment and machinery. OSHA

26 26 Subpart C General Safety and Health Provisions 1926.21 Safety training and education 1926.21(a) General requirements. The Secretary shall, pursuant to section 107(f) of the Act, establish and supervise programs for the education and training of employers, and employees in the recognition, avoidance and prevention of unsafe conditions in employments covered by the act. 1926.21(b) Employer responsibility. (1) The employer should avail himself of the safety and health training programs the Secretary provides. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION OSHA

27 Copyright 2005 USC27 Subpart C General Safety and Health Provisions 1926.21 Safety training and education 1926.21(b)(2) The employer shall instruct each employee in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe conditions and the regulations applicable to his work environment to control or eliminate any hazards or other exposure to illness or injury. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION OSHA

28 Copyright 2005 USC28 Subpart C General Safety and Health Provisions 1926.31 Incorporation by reference 1926.31(a) The standards of agencies of the U.S. Government, and organizations which are not agencies of the U.S. Government which are incorporated by reference in this part, have the same force and effect as other standards in this part. Only the mandatory provisions (i.e., provisions containing the word shall or other mandatory language) of standards incorporated by reference are adopted as standards under the Occupational Safety and Health Act…… OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION OSHA

29 Copyright 2005 USC29 Subpart C General Safety and Health Provisions 1926.32 Definitions 1926.32(b) ANSI means American National Standards Institute. 1926.32(c) Approved means sanctioned, endorsed, accredited, certified, or accepted as satisfactory by a duly constituted and nationally recognized authority or agency. OSHA OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

30 Copyright 2005 USC30 Subpart C General Safety and Health Provisions 1926.32 Definitions 1926.32(d) Authorized person means a person approved or assigned by the employer to perform a specific type of duty or duties or to be at a specific location or locations at the jobsite. 1926.32(e) Administration means the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. OSHA OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

31 Copyright 2005 USC31 Subpart C General Safety and Health Provisions 1926.32 Definitions 1926.32(f) Competent person means one who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them. OSHA OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

32 Copyright 2005 USC32 Subpart C General Safety and Health Provisions 1926.32 Definitions 1926.32(g) Construction work. For purposes of this section, construction work means work for construction, alteration, and/or repair, including painting and decorating. OSHA OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

33 Copyright 2005 USC33 Subpart C General Safety and Health Provisions 1926.32 Definitions 1926.32(q) Shall means mandatory 1926.32(r) Should means recommended OSHA OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

34 Copyright 2005 USC34 Fall Protection

35 Copyright 2005 USC35 Falls are the leading cause of deaths in the construction industry. Most fatalities occur when employees fall from open- sided floors and through floor openings. Falls from as little as 4 to 6 feet can cause serious lost-time accidents and sometimes death. Open-sided floors and platforms 6 feet or more in height must be guarded. Falls in Construction

36 Copyright 2005 USC36 This presentation will discuss: The working conditions that prompt use of fall protection Options that are available to protect workers from falls Fall Protection

37 Copyright 2005 USC37

38 Copyright 2005 USC38 Scaffolds

39 Copyright 2005 USC39 What Is A Scaffold? An elevated, temporary work platform Three basic types: Supported scaffolds -- platforms supported by rigid, load bearing members, such as poles, legs, frames, & outriggers Suspended scaffolds -- platforms suspended by ropes or other non- rigid, overhead support Aerial Lifts -- such as cherry pickers or boom trucks

40 Copyright 2005 USC40 Hazards Falls from elevation – caused by slipping, unsafe access, and the lack of fall protection Struck by falling tools / debris Electrocution – from overhead power lines Scaffold collapse - caused by instability or overloading Bad planking giving way Employees working on scaffolds are exposed to these hazards:

41 Copyright 2005 USC41

42 Copyright 2005 USC42 Excavations

43 Copyright 2005 USC43 Excavation Hazards Cave-ins are the greatest risk Other hazards include: Asphyxiation due to lack of oxygen Inhalation of toxic materials Fire Moving machinery near the edge of the excavation can cause a collapse Accidental severing of underground utility lines

44 Copyright 2005 USC44

45 Copyright 2005 USC45 Cranes

46 Copyright 2005 USC46 Major Causes of Crane Accidents Contact with power lines Overturns Falls Mechanical failures

47 Copyright 2005 USC47 Instability – unsecured load, load capacity exceeded, or ground not level or too soft Lack of communication - the point of operation is a distance from the crane operator or not in full view of the operator Lack of training Inadequate maintenance or inspection How Do Accidents Occur?

48 Copyright 2005 USC48

49 Copyright 2005 USC49 Tools – Hand and Power

50 Copyright 2005 USC50 Hazards Workers using hand and power tools may be exposed to these hazards: objects that fall, fly, are abrasive, or splash harmful dusts, fumes, mists, vapors, and gases frayed or damaged electrical cords, hazardous connections and improper grounding

51 Copyright 2005 USC51 Basic Tool Safety Rules Maintain regularly Use right tool for the job Inspect before use Operate according to manufacturers instructions Use the right personal protective equipment (PPE) Use guards

52 Copyright 2005 USC52

53 Copyright 2005 USC53 Electrical Safety - Construction

54 Copyright 2005 USC54 Electricity - The Dangers About 5 workers are electrocuted every week Causes 12% of young worker workplace deaths Takes very little electricity to cause harm Significant risk of causing fires

55 Copyright 2005 USC55 Electricity – How it Works Electricity is the flow of energy from one place to another Requires a source of power: usually a generating station A flow of electrons (current) travels through a conductor Travels in a closed circuit

56 Copyright 2005 USC56

57 Copyright 2005 USC57 Materials Handling, Storage, Use, and Disposal

58 Copyright 2005 USC58 Overview -- Handling and Storing Materials Involves diverse operations: Manual material handling Carrying bags or materials Unpacking materials Material handling via machine Forklift Crane Rigging Stacking or storing drums, barrels, kegs, lumber, loose bricks or other materials

59 Copyright 2005 USC59 Injuries Lifting objects is a major cause of back injuries in the work place Improper storing and handling of material and equipment can cause struck by and crushed by injuries

60 Copyright 2005 USC60 Hazards Improper manual lifting or carrying loads that are too large or heavy Being struck by materials or being caught in pinch points Crushed by machines, falling materials or improperly stored materials Incorrectly cutting ties or securing devices

61 Copyright 2005 USC61

62 Copyright 2005 USC62 Personal Protective Equipment

63 Copyright 2005 USC63 Protecting Employees from Workplace Hazards Employers must protect employees from hazards such as falling objects, harmful substances, and noise exposures that can cause injury Employers must: –Use all feasible engineering and work practice controls to eliminate and reduce hazards –Use personal protective equipment (PPE) if the controls dont eliminate the hazards. PPE is the last level of control!

64 Copyright 2005 USC64

65 Copyright 2005 USC65 Stairways and Ladders

66 Copyright 2005 USC66 Stairways and ladders cause many injuries and fatalities among construction workers About half the injuries caused by slips, trips and falls from ladders and stairways require time off the job Hazards Improper use of the top rung of a step ladder

67 Copyright 2005 USC67

68 Copyright 2005 USC68 Hazard Communication Material Safety Data Sheets Labels Written Program Training of Employees

69 Copyright 2005 USC69 1926.59 = 1910.1200 Hazard Communication

70 Copyright 2005 USC70

71 Copyright 2005 USC71 Questions? Thank you!


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