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Welcome to our Bible Study Solemnity of Christ the King C November 24, 2013 In preparation for this Sunday’s liturgy As aid in focusing our homilies and.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to our Bible Study Solemnity of Christ the King C November 24, 2013 In preparation for this Sunday’s liturgy As aid in focusing our homilies and."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to our Bible Study Solemnity of Christ the King C November 24, 2013 In preparation for this Sunday’s liturgy As aid in focusing our homilies and sharing Prepared by Fr. Cielo R. Almazan, OFM

2 1 st reading: 2 Samuel 5,1-3 1 In those days, all the tribes of Israel came to David in Hebron and said: "Here we are, your bone and your flesh. 2 In days past, when Saul was our king, it was you who led the Israelites out and brought them back. And the LORD said to you, 'You shall shepherd my people Israel and shall be commander of Israel.'" 3 When all the elders of Israel came to David in Hebron, King David made an agreement with them there before the LORD, and they anointed him king of Israel. The focus is on the kingship of David.

3 1 st reading: 2 Samuel 5,1-3 Tribes of Israel to David 1 In those days, all the tribes of Israel came to David in Hebron and said: "Here we are, your bone and your flesh. 2 In days past, when Saul was our king, it was you who led the Israelites out and brought them back. And the LORD said to you, 'You shall shepherd my people Israel and shall be commander of Israel.'" Elders of Israel to David 3 When all the elders of Israel came to David in Hebron, King David made an agreement with them there before the LORD, and they anointed him king of Israel. A simple outline!

4 Textual Context of 2 Samuel 5,1-3 Outline of the Books of Samuel (Boadt) 1 Sam 1-3 The childhood and prophetic call of Samuel 1 Sam 4-6 The Story of the Ark of the Covenant in battle 1 Sam 7-12 Samuel and Israel’s decision to have a king 1 Sam The story of Saul’s failure and David’s rise to power 2 Sam 1-8 David’s period of kingship over all Israel 2 Sam 9-20 The “Succession Narrative” of David’s sons 2 Sam Appendix of other David traditions

5 1 st reading: 2 Samuel 5,1-3 Tribes of Israel to David 1 In those days, all the tribes of Israel came to David in Hebron and said: "Here we are, your bone and your flesh. 2 In days past, when Saul was our king, it was you who led the Israelites out and brought them back. And the LORD said to you, 'You shall shepherd my people Israel and shall be commander of Israel.'" Elders of Israel to David 3 When all the elders of Israel came to David in Hebron, King David made an agreement with them there before the LORD, and they anointed him king of Israel. Commentary Saul, the first king of Israel, is dead. David becomes the second king of Israel. The Northern Tribes (10 tribes) pledge allegiance to David (of the South / Judah) in Hebron. V.1 Hebron is located in the South. V.2 recalls the days of their former king Saul. The tribes recall in relation to the leadership of David. David’s leadership is to be shepherd (nurturing) and commander (defender) of Israel. In v.3, David makes agreement (covenant) with them. They anoint him (masiha / messiah) king of Israel.

6 Reflections on the 1 st reading Leaders must be acceptable to the people (like King David). Leadership (kingship, authority) is service. Leaders are supposed to give direction, lead to green pastures (shepherd) and defend the people (commander), not victimize the poor and the whole nation. The leaders must be wise, God-fearing and have high moral standards. In turn, the people (like the 10 tribes of Israel) must pledge allegiance (show loyalty and support) to the leadership.

7 Resp. Ps 122:1-2, 3-4, 4-5 R. (cf. 1) Let us go rejoicing to the house of the Lord. 1 I rejoiced because they said to me, "We will go up to the house of the LORD." 2 And now we have set foot within your gates, O Jerusalem. 3 Jerusalem, built as a city with compact unity. 4 To it the tribes go up, the tribes of the LORD. 4 According to the decree for Israel, to give thanks to the name of the LORD. 5 In it are set up judgment seats, seats for the house of David.

8 Resp. Ps 122:1-2, 3-4, 4-5 R. (cf. 1) Let us go rejoicing to the house of the Lord. 1 I rejoiced because they said to me, "We will go up to the house of the LORD." 2 And now we have set foot within your gates, O Jerusalem. 3 Jerusalem, built as a city with compact unity. 4 To it the tribes go up, the tribes of the LORD. 4 According to the decree for Israel, to give thanks to the name of the LORD. 5 In it are set up judgment seats, seats for the house of David. Commentary The psalm is a psalm of ascent (to Jerusalem). It is every Jew’s dream to go up to Jerusalem as a pilgrim. V.1 indicates the joy of a person when invited to go up to the Temple of Jerusalem. V.2 immediately reports that the pilgrims are now within the gates (premises) of the Temple. V.3 focuses on the whole city of Jerusalem (compact, walled, everything is there). V.4 indicates that all the tribes (Israelite nation), not just some individuals, go to Jerusalem. V.4b indicates the purpose: to fulfill the law, to give thanks to God. In v.5, the judgment seats are the reception hall (1 Kgs 7,7)

9 Reflections on the Psalm We are all pilgrims on earth. We have to recognize (identify) an important place to go for our spiritual upliftment. The disposition of a pilgrim is that of joy because he/she believes he/she is drawing close to a beneficent leadership (king, who represents God). The pilgrim walks with other people and tribes. Pilgrimages re-roots (re-grounds) us to the origins of our faith or to the ones that enhance it. We have leave our comfort zones to attain it. Have you joined a pilgrimage (local or overseas)?

10 2 nd reading: Colossians 1, Let us give thanks to the Father, who has made you fit to share in the inheritance of the holy ones in light. 13 He delivered us from the power of darkness and transferred us to the kingdom of his beloved Son, 14 in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins. 15 He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. 16 For in him were created all things in heaven and on earth, the visible and the invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or powers; all things were created through him and for him. 17 He is before all things, and in him all things hold together. 18 He is the head of the body, the church. He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in all things he himself might be preeminent. 19 For in him all the fullness was pleased to dwell, 20 and through him to reconcile all things for him, making peace by the blood of his cross (through him), whether those on earth or those in heaven. The focus is on the primacy of Christ. Take note of all the prepositions which highlight it.

11 2 nd reading: Colossians 1,12-20 The Father 12 Let us give thanks to the Father, who has made you fit to share in the inheritance of the holy ones in light. 13 He delivered us from the power of darkness and transferred us The Son to the kingdom of his beloved Son, (kingdom, kingship) 14 in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins. (salvation) 15 He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of all creation. (represents God, representative) 16 For in him were created all things in heaven and on earth, the visible and the invisible, whether thrones or dominions or principalities or powers; (angels?) all things were created through him and for him. (creation) 17 He is before all things, (pre-existent) and in him all things hold together. (integrator) A simple outline!

12 18 He is the head of the body, the church. (leader of the church) He is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead, that in all things he himself might be preeminent. (number one) 19 For in him all the fullness was pleased to dwell, (dwelling place of God) 20 and through him to reconcile all things for him, making peace by the blood of his cross (through him), whether those on earth or those in heaven. (reconciler)

13 Commentary on the 2 nd reading There are many titles which are attributed to Jesus. The reading enumerates who Jesus is in relation to the Father, to creation, to us, the Church, to the dead (resurrection). The text brings out theological subjects like christology, ecclesiology, soteriology and a little eschatology. With all the big titles, the Christian reader cannot take Jesus Christ for granted.

14 Reflections on the 2 nd reading This battery of information about Jesus builds up the image of Christ as King (pre-existent, pre-eminent, nothing is higher, greater, nobler than he). Who are we not to serve his interests? (God’s politics) Who are we to ignore his laws and decrees? (to be disobedient, insubordinate?) Who are we to take his Church for granted? After having heard all his titles, we must be dumb or crazy if we cannot make appropriate conclusions and concrete actions.

15 Gospel reading: Luke 23, The rulers sneered at Jesus and said, "He saved others, let him save himself if he is the chosen one, the Messiah of God." 36 Even the soldiers jeered at him. As they approached to offer him wine 37 they called out, "If you are King of the Jews, save yourself." 38 Above him there was an inscription that read, "This is the King of the Jews." 39 Now one of the criminals hanging there reviled Jesus, saying, "Are you not the Messiah? Save yourself and us." 40 The other, however, rebuking him, said in reply, "Have you no fear of God, for you are subject to the same condemnation? 41 And indeed, we have been condemned justly, for the sentence we received corresponds to our crimes, but this man has done nothing criminal." 42 Then he said, "Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom." 43 He replied to him, "Amen, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise." The focus is on the kingship of Christ.

16 Gospel reading: Luke 23,35-43 The rulers 35 The rulers sneered at Jesus and said, "He saved others, let him save himself if he is the chosen one, the Messiah of God." The soldiers 36 Even the soldiers jeered at him. As they approached to offer him wine 37 they called out, "If you are King of the Jews, save yourself." 38 Above him there was an inscription that read, "This is the King of the Jews." The Criminals 39 Now one of the criminals hanging there reviled Jesus, saying, "Are you not the Messiah? Save yourself and us." 40 The other, however, rebuking him, said in reply, "Have you no fear of God, for you are subject to the same condemnation? 41 And indeed, we have been condemned justly, for the sentence we received corresponds to our crimes, but this man has done nothing criminal." 42 Then he said, "Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom." Jesus the King 43 He replied to him, "Amen, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise." A simple outline!

17 Gospel reading: Luke 23,35-43 The rulers 35 The rulers sneered at Jesus and said, "He saved others, let him save himself if he is the chosen one, the Messiah of God." The soldiers 36 Even the soldiers jeered at him. As they approached to offer him wine 37 they called out, "If you are King of the Jews, save yourself." 38 Above him there was an inscription that read, "This is the King of the Jews." The Criminals 39 Now one of the criminals hanging there reviled Jesus, saying, "Are you not the Messiah? Save yourself and us." 40 The other, however, rebuking him, said in reply, "Have you no fear of God, for you are subject to the same condemnation? 41 And indeed, we have been condemned justly, for the sentence we received corresponds to our crimes, but this man has done nothing criminal." 42 Then he said, "Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom." Jesus the King 43 He replied to him, "Amen, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise." Commentary The story belongs to the Passion Narrative of Luke. The reading contrasts between two kinds of people (sinners).  The first kind: the one that sneers, jeers and reviles (rulers, soldiers, criminal at left)  The second kind: the one that rebukes fellow criminal, but believes in the kingship of Christ. The criminal at right seems to understand the meaning of Christ’s kingdom and kingship. He sees the kingship of Christ in the context of suffering and crucifixion. What a paradox! Jesus is not a king who rules it over, not a king who eliminates his enemies, not a king who does not allow himself to be insulted, trampled upon, and humiliated.

18 Reflections on the gospel reading The gospel reading highlights the kingship of Christ at Mt. Calvary. Luke does not present Jesus as king when he successfully preaches, casts out demons, debates with the Pharisees and Sadducees. The gospel reading briefly develops the kingship of Christ at the violent end of his life. Precisely, the keen reader must detect the theology behind this. To be a king is to serve the nation, by making necessary sacrifices.

19 Like the criminal, we, too, sinners, can best acknowledge Jesus as king, if we suffer with him, if we are willing to carry our own crosses, if we are defeated and humiliated and acknowledge this mystery. The solemnity of Christ the King can best be celebrated, if we ourselves are willing to undergo the same fate. We cannot be crucified like Christ, if we have not advanced the kingdom of God through preaching, teaching, healing and forgiving.

20 Tying the 3 readings and the Psalm The first reading is about the kingship of David. People go to him to show their loyalty and obedience and anoint him as their king. The psalm expresses joy in going to the seat of the king (God) in the Jerusalem. The second reading describes the kingship of Jesus in terms of his pre-eminence. The gospel reading describes how Jesus is recognized as king on Mt. Calvary.

21 How to develop your homily / sharing Do you have a picture or statue of Christ the King in your house? Do you join in the procession for Christ the King? How do you understand Christ as King? In what way Jesus is king? What is expected of a king?

22 In the OT, as in the first reading, to be a king is to lead, to shepherd (to protect) the people. The kingship of David was not forced, or taken by deceit. It is also to represent God. He has to follow God’s law. It is a big mistake to be autocratic, to rule independently from God.

23 The second reading is replete with descriptions that refer to Christ as king. His kingship is all embracing, cosmic, he is not just a king of this world. We attribute our existence through his pre- eminence (kingship). We gain our victory, salvation, and deliverance from him.

24 The gospel portrays a different kind of kingship, that which is crowned with thorns, not silver, gold and diamond. Christ as king, his kingdom being not of this world, submits himself to violent men and women. No one defends him. His throne is the cross; he is surrounded not by attendants, but by criminals. He is portrayed like a criminal, deserving a violent death. There is no honor and glory where he stands / hangs. His kingship is not at all triumphant and victorious. It is a failure in the eyes of the world and of his disciples.

25 As Christians, we cannot really acknowledge or recognize Christ as our king if we have not participated in his mission and if we have not gone with him in his Calvary. The criminal, in a mysterious way (how did he know?), recognized him as sinless (thus he does not deserve to be hanged) and having a kingdom (for the thief said remember me in your kingdom). Where did he get the idea?  In the way Jesus handled his enemies. The thief has been exposed to him for some hours. He sensed something unusual.  Jesus passes the test up to the last moment. He does not react to provocations. He does not play with their games. He is focused. There is no meaning to the pictures of Christ the King that we keep or the processions that we join, if we miss the point of the gospel.

26 Before we encourage people to join processions, can we catechize them about Christ the King? Sermons are not enough. We can do the same to the other feasts which we lavishly celebrate in our parishes.

27 In the eucharist, Jesus reminds us that his kingship is not that of lording over or showing off power, but of service. Jesus as king and shepherd comes to feed us with his body and blood. In the eucharist, Jesus comes to govern us with his rule of love and self-sacrifice. In the eucharist, as pilgrims, we humbly go to Jesus to acknowledge him as our king and God.

28 Our Context of Sin and Grace Totalitarian government Autocratic Dictator Tyrant Authoritarian Dirty politician who want to win in the elections by all means (terrorism, vote buying, ballot snatching, killing of the opponent) Victimizes Subverts the will of the people and of God Govern by authority, not by reason Impulsive Absentee Service-oriented Principle of subsidiarity Works for the common good Authority with compassion Nurturing, satisfying, life- giving Loyal to God Willing to sacrifice Have self-control Help rebuild people’s lives affected by Yolanda.

29 Suggested Songs Lord Jesus Christ  Christus Vincit  Problems (for reflection only)


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