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MONTUESWEDTHURSFRI 91011 NCAE 1213 PTC >:) 1617 Study Holiday 181920 2324252627 IP4 – no deadline IP5 & IP6 – Oct 15 & Nov 12 (Tues) IP1b Signif IP2c Journals.

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Presentation on theme: "MONTUESWEDTHURSFRI 91011 NCAE 1213 PTC >:) 1617 Study Holiday 181920 2324252627 IP4 – no deadline IP5 & IP6 – Oct 15 & Nov 12 (Tues) IP1b Signif IP2c Journals."— Presentation transcript:

1 MONTUESWEDTHURSFRI NCAE 1213 PTC >:) 1617 Study Holiday IP4 – no deadline IP5 & IP6 – Oct 15 & Nov 12 (Tues) IP1b Signif IP2c Journals IP2d – October 3 LAB REP: Thousandths IP3 Bground LAB REP: Mments IP2a & b IP GROUP & TOPIC

2 STRICTER WITH REQUIREMENTS EFFORT!

3 LAB REPORT F1 or F2Repeat F1 or F2 in revisedPTC IP SUBMISSIONS Two failingRepeat & PTC Do it once? Do it well!

4 IP GROUPS ARE NOW FINAL.

5 IP FEEDBACK Sir, kailangan nun? Sir, individual yun? Do you even talk in person? Consultation? Submit notebook without 2a & 2b? Did you copy the pointers? For lab report?

6  Objectives, Methodology  Data and Results: Attach handout, (next slide)  Analysis: (next slide)  Answers to GQ & Reflection: Copy and answer  Bibliography: See Sources handout  INCLUDE Contributions: Bullet form  NO Problem Statement, Hypothesis, Conclusion  ABSENT DURING LAB: Do NOT include

7 DATA & RESULTS –Encode and COMPLETE the tables –Picture of riders –Explain Least Count –Paragraph discussing the results (“trend”) ANALYSIS –Explain how to use cent-o-gram balance –Compute for % error –Sources of error: accuracy vs precision –Apply SigFig % error = actual – experimental x 100 actual

8 % error = actual – experimental x 100 actual ITEM MASS OF CONTAINER + SAMPLE (g) MASS OF SAMPLE (g) EXPECTED MASS OF SAMPLE (g) Plastic container + sample Plastic container + sample 2 Plastic container + sample 3 Mass of the empty plastic container = g

9 % error = g – g x 100 = 12.19% g ITEM MASS OF CONTAINER + SAMPLE (g) MASS OF SAMPLE (g) EXPECTED MASS OF SAMPLE (g) Plastic container + sample Plastic container + sample 2 Plastic container + sample 3 Mass of the empty plastic container = g

10 % difference= value 1 - value 2 x 100 (value 1 + value 2) / 2 No. of Trials Height of the Student (cm) Length of Forearm of the Student (cm) Using the Meterstick Using the Ruler Using the Meterstick Using the Ruler Average (cm)

11 % difference= x 100 ( ) / 2 = 10.65% No. of Trials Height of the Student (cm) Length of Forearm of the Student (cm) Using the Meterstick Using the Ruler Using the Meterstick Using the Ruler Average (cm) %

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13 IP NOTEBOOK * Notebook as ‘scratch paper’

14 ACTIVITY #1 Make sure that everything is stapled or glued to your notebook

15 IP 2a: Literature Hunt Topics In your IP notebook Handwritten List of topics for literature hunt – Outline of topics to be researched (bullet points) – Name of student assigned for each topic Outline of topics should be detailed – ‘calamansi’ is not enough – specify what about calamansi they are concerned with – origin and diversity, benefits, etc.)

16 ACTIVITY #2 Fix your LitHunt topics

17 IP 2b: Literature Hunt - Book Due LAST FRIDAY Look for a reference (INDIVIDUAL) in the form of book(s) Photocopy pages related to your assigned LitHunt topic Make highlights and notes Make a bibliographical entry on the front page Staple pages together Insert in your IP notebook (Write your name)

18 Dodds, Joshua. Experiments in Plant Tissue Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Delocado, Emmanuel D. 1-X

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20 Information Source Bibliographical Entry In-text Citation Book Dodds, Joshua. Experiments in Plant Tissue Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, (Dodds 1987) Caligaris-Cappio, Felisse, and Dalla Robert. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. New York: Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, (Caligaris- Cappio and Dalla 2005) Smoot, Robert C., Smith, Richard G., and Price, Jack. Chemistry: A Modern Course. Ohio: Merrill Publishing Company, (Smoot et al. 2000) Journal Swanson, Dan. “Dialogue with a Catalogue.” Library Quarterly 34 (December 1994): (Swanson 1994) Malave-Orengom, Jonathan, Rubio-Marrero, Ervin, and Rios-Velazquez, Marie Jose. “Isolation and Characterization of Bioluminescent Bacteria from Marine Environments of Puerto Rico.” Technology and Education Topics in Applied Microbiology and Microbial Biotechnology 23 (August 2006): (Malaye- Orengom et al. 2006)

21 ACTIVITY #3 By GROUP Write bibliographical entry for Dynamic Science Dodds, Joshua. Experiments in Plant Tissue Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Caligaris-Cappio, Felisse, and Dalla Robert. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. New York: Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, Smoot, Robert C., Smith, Richard G., and Price, Jack. Chemistry: A Modern Course. Ohio: Merrill Publishing Company, 1990.

22 IP 2c: Literature Hunt - Journals Due on September 25 (Wednesday) Look for three journal articles PER PERSON Photocopy or print pages related to your assigned LitHunt topic Make highlights and notes Make a bibliographical entry on the front page Staple pages together, in a folder Insert in your IP notebook

23 ACTIVITY #4 By GROUP Practice: Write bibliographical entry for a journal Swanson, Dan. “Dialogue with a Catalogue.” Library Quarterly 34 (December 1994): Malave-Orengom, Jonathan, Rubio-Marrero, Ervin, and Rios-Velazquez, Marie Jose. “Isolation and Characterization of Bioluminescent Bacteria from Marine Environments of Puerto Rico.” Technology and Education Topics in Applied Microbiology and Microbial Biotechnology 23 (August 2006):

24 IP 2d: Literature Hunt Due on October 3 Submitted in a long plastic envelope Arrange in order 1.Bibliographical list –List of sources in alphabetical order –TNR, 11, single spaced, 6 pt spacing after each sentence 2. IP Submission 2a –Photocopy 3.RRL entry (INDIV) –At least a two-page discussion on the assigned topic using the source from the library –Format using both in- text citation and bibliographical entry –No plagiarism –May use x > 1 source –BONUS FOR MAGIS :) 4.Sources (INDIV) –Photocopied, with highlights and notes –Books, journals, vertical files

25 Bioluminescence as a biochemical process Bioluminescence or biological fluorescence is a biochemical process that is exhibited by selected fishes, insects, cnidarians, worms, protists, algae, bacteria, and other living organisms. Bioluminescent organisms are mechanically excited to produce light by the ship's course or even by the movement of porpoises and smaller fish (Doe 2005). The activity can be observed when ATP and oxygen cleaves to the luciferin which is then triggered by the luciferase. The chemical energy and the increased energy level excite the luminescent molecule. This results to photon emissions, which produces the light (Barnard and Liu 2007). In the sea, bioluminescent glow is intense in the blue pane of utmost visual lucidity of seawater. Most organisms emit between 440 nm and 479 nm. Some organisms emit light continuously, but most emit flashes of durations ranging from about 1/10 to 10 seconds. However, if cultured, the bioluminescent activity will last up to two weeks (Bedard et al. 2008). IP2d: Literature Hunt

26 Information Source Bibliographical Entry In-text Citation Book Dodds, Joshua. Experiments in Plant Tissue Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, (Dodds 1987) Caligaris-Cappio, Felisse, and Dalla Robert. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. New York: Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, (Caligaris- Cappio and Dalla 2005) Smoot, Robert C., Smith, Richard G., and Price, Jack. Chemistry: A Modern Course. Ohio: Merrill Publishing Company, (Smoot et al. 2000) Journal Swanson, Dan. “Dialogue with a Catalogue.” Library Quarterly 34 (December 1994): (Swanson 1994) Malave-Orengom, Jonathan, Rubio-Marrero, Ervin, and Rios-Velazquez, Marie Jose. “Isolation and Characterization of Bioluminescent Bacteria from Marine Environments of Puerto Rico.” Technology and Education Topics in Applied Microbiology and Microbial Biotechnology 23 (August 2006): (Malaye- Orengom et al. 2006)

27 Information Source Bibliographical EntryIn-text Citation Magazine Tuchman, Barbara W. “If Asia were Clay in the Hands of the West.” Atlantic. September 1990, pp (Tuchman 1990) Encyclopedia Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th ed. S.V. “Blake, William,” by J.M. Comyns- Carr. (Comyns-Carr) Newspaper Lok, Niko, Francisco, Luis, and Syling, Andrew. “And then there were six.” The Guidon December 2009, sec. Inquiry, pp.2-3. (Lok et al. 2009) “Amazing Amazon Region.” New York Times 12 January 1970, sec. 4, p.E11. (New York Times 1970) Interview Franklin, Benjamin, interview by Robert de Leon, Plant Diseases, Bureau of Plant Industry, Sept. 30, (de Leon 1994) Website Schmillinger C. Bloomberg Crude Oil Rises to Record Above $144 After U.S. Stockpile Drop.. Date accessed: 28 February (Schmillinger 2008) Bloomberg Business Week Investigations New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc.. Date accessed: 28 February (Bloomberg Business Week Investigations 2010)

28 Plagiarism is the act of using one’s thoughts, ideas, and words (both intentionally and unintentionally) without citing its proper source. FIVE TYPES OF PLAGIARISM Copy & Paste (and Mosaic) Plagiarism Word Switch Plagiarism Style Plagiarism Metaphor Plagiarism Idea Plagiarism PLAGIARISM

29 Plagiarism is the act of using one’s thoughts, ideas, and words (both intentionally and unintentionally) without citing its proper source. Why is plagiarism bad? Sanction for plagiarism? More on plagiarism in Ateneo: Google: The Guidon Intellectual Pretenders PLAGIARISM

30 Water on Earth is always changing. Its repeating changes make a cycle. As water goes through its cycle, it can be a solid (ice), a liquid (water), or a gas (water vapor). Ice can change to become water or water vapor. Water can change to become ice or water vapor. Water vapor can change to become ice or water. PLAGIARISM Water on Earth is always changing. Its repeating changes make a cycle. As water goes through its cycle, it can be a solid (ice), a liquid (water), or a gas (water vapor). Ice can change to become water or water vapor. Water can change to become ice or water vapor. Water vapor can change to become ice or water.

31 Water on Earth is always changing. Its repeating changes make a cycle. As water goes through its cycle, it can be a solid (ice), a liquid (water), or a gas (water vapor). Ice can change to become water or water vapor. Water can change to become ice or water vapor. Water vapor can change to become ice or water. PLAGIARISM “Water on Earth is always changing. Its repeating changes make a cycle. As water goes through its cycle, it can be a solid (ice), a liquid (water), or a gas (water vapor). Ice can change to become water or water vapor. Water can change to become ice or water vapor. Water vapor can change to become ice or water.”

32 Water on Earth is always changing. Its repeating changes make a cycle. As water goes through its cycle, it can be a solid (ice), a liquid (water), or a gas (water vapor). Ice can change to become water or water vapor. Water can change to become ice or water vapor. Water vapor can change to become ice or water. PLAGIARISM Water on Earth is always changing. Its repeating changes make a cycle. As water goes through its cycle, it can be a solid (ice), a liquid (water), or a gas (water vapor). Ice can change to become water or water vapor. Water can change to become ice or water vapor. Water vapor can change to become ice or water (Genson 2010).

33 Water on Earth is always changing. Its repeating changes make a cycle. As water goes through its cycle, it can be a solid (ice), a liquid (water), or a gas (water vapor). Ice can change to become water or water vapor. Water can change to become ice or water vapor. Water vapor can change to become ice or water. PLAGIARISM Water on earth is always changing and dynamic. Its repeating changes make a rotation. As water goes through its cycle, it can be a gas (water vapor), a liquid (water), or solid (ice). Ice can transform to become water or water vapor. Water can change to become ice or water vapor. Water vapor can change to become ice or water.

34 Water on Earth is always changing. Its repeating changes make a cycle. As water goes through its cycle, it can be a solid (ice), a liquid (water), or a gas (water vapor). Ice can change to become water or water vapor. Water can change to become ice or water vapor. Water vapor can change to become ice or water. PLAGIARISM The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle or the H 2 O cycle, describes the continuous movement of water on, above and below the surface of the Earth. Have you wondered how this occurs in nature? As water goes through its cycle, it can be a solid (ice), a liquid (water), or a gas (water vapor). Thus, essentially, one form of matter changes to another in water cycle. The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle or the H 2 O cycle, describes the continuous movement of water on, above and below the surface of the Earth. Although the balance of water on Earth remains fairly constant over time, individual water molecules can come and go, in and out of the atmosphere.

35 ACTIVITY #5 Write a five-sentence related literature on the following topics. Use in-text citation and bibliographical entry. 1Petroleum (DySci, pp ) 2Evidences of Continental Drift (DySci, pp ) 3Asteroids (DySci, pp ) 4Earthquake (DySci, pp ) HOMEWORK Double Ex: Exercise, pp , 26-27

36 IP 2b: Literature Hunt Due on September 18 Submitted in a long plastic envelope Arrange in order 1.Bibliographical list –List of sources in alphabetical order –TNR, 11, single spaced, 6 pt spacing after each sentence 2. IP Submission 2a –Photocopy 3.RRL entry (INDIV) –At least a two-page discussion on the assigned topic using the source from the library –Format using both in- text citation and bibliographical entry –No plagiarism –May use x > 1 source 4.Source (INDIV) –Photocopied, with highlights and notes –Books, journals, vertical files

37 B I B L I O G R A P H Y “Amazing Amazon Region.” New York Times 12 January 1970, sec. 4, p.E11. Bloomberg Business Week Investigations New York Mercantile Exchange, Inc.. Date accessed: 28 February Caligaris-Cappio, Felisse, and Dalla Robert. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. New York: Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, Dodds, Joshua. Experiments in Plant Tissue Culture. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Encyclopedia Britannica, 11th ed. S.V. “Blake, William,” by J.M. Comyns-Carr. Franklin, Benjamin, interview by Robert de Leon, Plant Diseases, Bureau of Plant Industry, Sept. 30, 1994.Lok, Niko, Francisco, Luis, and Syling, Andrew. “And then there were six.” The Guidon December 2009, sec. Inquiry, pp.2-3. Malave-Orengom, Jonathan, Rubio-Marrero, Ervin, and Rios-Velazquez, Marie Jose. “Isolation and Characterization of Bioluminescent Bacteria from Marine Environments of Puerto Rico.” Technology and Education Topics in Applied Microbiology and Microbial Biotechnology 23 (August 2006): IP2d: Literature Hunt

38  Problem Statement, Hypothesis: on part A only  Objectives, Methodology: parts A to C  Data & Results: Attach handout, encode (COMPLETE data table), discuss how to measure  Reflection: Copy and answer  Bibliography: See Sources handout  INCLUDE Contributions: Bullet form  NO Guide Questions (incorporated in Analysis)  ABSENT DURING LAB: Do NOT include

39 ANALYSIS Apply Significant Figures in computation. % difference= value 1 + value 2 x 100 (value 1 + value 2) / 2 PART AIV & DV, explain relationship (GQ1) PART BSolve for % difference (ave ms & ave ruler) Sources of error PART CGQ3

40 If we don’t want this set-up, let us exert more effort to our duties. Do it well or do it again. HOMEWORK Read Double Ex: Exercise, pp , 26-27


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