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FIG. 19 BUILDING WITH PENTHOUSE. FIG. 20 DAMAGE TO SHEAR WALL.

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Presentation on theme: "FIG. 19 BUILDING WITH PENTHOUSE. FIG. 20 DAMAGE TO SHEAR WALL."— Presentation transcript:

1 FIG. 19 BUILDING WITH PENTHOUSE

2 FIG. 20 DAMAGE TO SHEAR WALL

3 OTHER BUILDING DAMAGE The majority of the buildings surveyed are four story RC buildings that portray the characteristics of the building stock in Bingol. This is due to the construction regulation that places a limit on the building height. The damage patterns experienced by the components of another RC shear wall building [ 4 Stories] comprise the most spectacular cases of damage resulting from poor material quality and improper reinforcement (Figures 21 to 25).

4 FIG. 21 FOUR STORIED BUILDING NO DAMAGE OBSERVED FROM THE EXTERIOR

5 FIG. 22 SHEAR WALL FAILURE IN INTERIOR NOTE INSUFFICIENT REINFORCEMENT

6 FIG. 23 BRITTLE FAILURE OF COLUMN Note buckling of bars due to insufficient lateral confinement and crushing of core concrete.

7 FIG. 24 SHEAR CRACK IN COLUMN

8 FIG. 25 POOR CONNECTION DETAILING

9 PERFORMANCE OF SCHOOL AND GOVERNMENTAL BUILDINGS Observations indicate that a fraction of existing buildings suffer severe earthquake damage while the remaining portion do not create any life-safety hazard. Buildings which suffer most from the earthquakes are governmental buildings. In the Bingol earthquake almost 60% of the deaths occurred in the school buildings or in the dormitories. Another observation made in Turkey is that damaged structures generally have the same deficiencies. These major deficiencies are as follows: Poor lateral strength Lap splices made at floor levels with inadequate lap splice length Inadequately confined member end zones Poor detailing of the ties (instead of 135°, the hooks were 90°) Improper detailing of the beam bottom reinforcement Poor concrete quality

10 DAMAGE TO SCHOOL BUILDINGS In Bingol, 39 governmental buildings, of which 19 were school buildings, were investigated in detail. The number of stories, type of structure, apparent quality, and the location of the building were studied. Among these, 5 were heavily damaged, 14 were moderately and 20 were lightly damaged. Among these buildings only two were masonry type structures used as school buildings. 17 buildings were Reinforced Concrete Frame (RCF) with Masonry infill Walls, and the remaining 20 buildings were Reinforced Concrete Frame with Shear Walls (RCSW). The construction year of only a few structures could be determined. None of the structures were built according to the latest Turkish Seismic Code (1998 version).

11 TRAGEDY AT BINGOL In the Bingol earthquake, the most tragic collapse occurred at Çeltiksuyu Okulu which was a primary school (Figure 26) with a hostel or dormitory (Figure 27). Since the earthquake occurred at 3:27 a.m. local time, the majority of the students were asleep inside the collapsed dormitory and 84 (out of 195) students and 1 teacher lost their lives. In Figure 28, on the same block there appears a 3-story building, which was used by the teachers as a hostel. As is seen, there was no damage observed in that building (Figure 28). Therefore explanations of the damage implying the effect of soil conditions seem unreasonable.

12 FIG. 26 SCHOOL BUILDING

13 FIG. 27 PANCAKING OF HOSTEL BUILDING

14 FIG. 28 NO DAMAGE TO TEACHERS BLOCK

15 ANOTHER SCHOOL - KALEONU Another school building which had the same number of stories, type of structural system, apparent quality, plan of the building, and same orientation with the Celtiksuyu school was the Kaleonu school. As is seen in Figure 29, both school buildings had the same damage although the soil conditions were different. Similar to the Celtiksuyu office building, in the Kaleonu office building there was also no damage at all (Figure 30).

16 FIG. 29 KALEONU SCHOOL DAMAGE

17 FIG. 30 KALEONU OFFICE – NO DAMAGE

18 AGRICULTURAL BANK – LITTLE DAMAGE Figures 31 and 32 show a conventional four- story RC frame with shear wall building used as a government bank. Although the building has a soft story it experienced light damage indicating that the load-resisting elements performed very well. The apparent material quality was good, and the resistance to lateral loads was mainly provided by the shear walls. The infill walls are composed of conventional hollow clay tile used in practice for partition walls. Diagonal cracks appear on the non-structural components, i.e. masonry infill walls (Figure 32).

19 FIG. 31 AGRI-BANK – LITTLE DAMAGE

20 FIG. 32 MINOR INTERNAL DAMAGE

21 TEDAS BUILDING Another conventional four-story RC frame shear wall type government structure with poor apparent material quality is TEDAS (Figures 33 and 34). This building is the branch office of the Turkish Electricity Distribution Company. It experienced moderate damage indicating that load-resisting elements performed well with respect to life-safety. The resistance to lateral loads was mainly provided by the shear walls, which suffered no damage. On the other hand, columns suffered moderate to heavy damages. The building has several inadequacies against lateral loads like strong beams-weak columns, short columns (Figure 34), and inadequate lateral steel (Figure 35).

22 FIG. 33 TEDAS SHEAR-WALL BUILDING

23 FIG. 34 TEDAS – SHORT COLUMN EFFECT

24 FIG. 35 INADEQUATE COLUMN CONFINEMENT

25 In Figure 36, Bingol high school building is shown. This building is also a four-story RC frame with shear wall type structure. However its apparent material quality and the lateral reinforcement were poor. As a result the structural system suffered heavy damage. A spectacular example of the diagonal shear crack and crushing of the concrete core at the shear wall due to a combination of inferior material quality and inadequate transverse reinforcement is shown in Figures 37 and 38. Although the shear walls were heavily damaged their presence prevented the total collapse of the building. Also, there are diagonal shear cracks in the non-structural members which suffered light damage

26 FIG. 36 BINGOL HIGH SCHOOL

27 FIG. 37 CONCRETE CRUSHING IN SHEARWALL

28 FIG. 37 INADEQUATE REINFORCEMENT IN SHEAR WALL (spacing > 30 cm.)

29 SUMMING UP Most of the government buildings in Bingol suffered moderate to heavy damage during the May 1st 2003 Bingol earthquake. A large number of children lost their lives due to avoidable and preventable mistakes made in the construction practice in Bingol. RC buildings with very poor concrete quality, undeformed bars, inadequate horizontal tie spacing with improper bent length and angles, poor lateral strength and stability caused heavy damage or total collapse of buildings.

30 NON-ENGINEERED STRUCTURES In the Bingol downtown area, the majority of the buildings are engineered, RC frame type structures with a small percentage of masonry type buildings. Most of the masonry structures downtown are also engineered. In the rural areas of Bingol, a majority of the houses are masonry type non-engineered structures. The houses generally have one story and the common construction material is stone (Figure 38). Some of these buildings have basements that are used for food storage or animal shelter. Some of the rural masonry buildings demonstrate hybrid construction materials with a mixture of wooden struts and brick infill material.

31 FIG. 38 TYPICAL RURAL MASONRY

32 BINGOL RURAL STRUCTURES The categorization of non-engineered structures is not easy due to the large variation in construction techniques and workmanship. The majority of the houses are constructed using large stones either in rectangular shapes or boulder like irregular forms. Those stones are commonly placed together using weak mortar along their contact surfaces. Sometimes the walls are made out of solid fire bricks with wooden struts in the diagonal and vertical directions showing indications of engineering ingenuity (Figure 39). Such masonry construction usually performed better during the earthquake due to their lightweight construction and shear resistance shown by the diagonal struts. Non-engineered rural buildings are composed of stone wall layers which is divided by the use of collar or ring beams in the form of band-like horizontal wooden layers (Figure 40). This type of construction has performed better than the stone-only type of construction as the ring beams impart some integrity to the structure.

33 FIG. 39 CRUDE DWELLING WITH LATERAL LOAD RESISTANCE

34 FIG. 40 RING BEAMS FOR STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY


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