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“ A great photo happens when a photographer sees a situation unfolding in front of them that evokes an emotion that the photographer feels deep down, in.

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Presentation on theme: "“ A great photo happens when a photographer sees a situation unfolding in front of them that evokes an emotion that the photographer feels deep down, in."— Presentation transcript:

1 “ A great photo happens when a photographer sees a situation unfolding in front of them that evokes an emotion that the photographer feels deep down, in the middle of their chest. And in a split second, they then make a conscience choice of exposure, lens, depth of field, lighting, body language, composition, etc., and releases the shutter. The film is then processed, scanned, laid out on a page, printed on a press, driven across town to the newspaper carrier who throws it on some guy's porch, who then opens the newspaper and looks down at that photo... And if that guy gets the same feeling deep down in the middle of his chest that the photographer did when they viewed the situation in the first place, the photographer has made a great photo." -- Nancy L. Ford, photographer

2 Day 1: Basic Concepts to Understanding Photography

3 Film vs Digital Film –potentially better quality photo (equal to 20 mp) –better at high speeds and low light –better crispness and vividness –potentially better color –longer print/source life –camera is less expensive Digital –immediate feedback –viewing screen –can see creative changes as you adjust (on some) –free if you don’t print –easier digital manipulation –no developing costs (some storage and battery costs)

4 Types of Digital Camera Ultra-compact –Very small (1” thick max) –Generally Inexpensive –Simple and convenient –Images not as good – megapixels –Limited or no zoom

5 Types of Digital Camera Ultra-compact –Very small (1” thick max) –Generally Inexpensive –Simple and convenient –Images not as good – megapixels –Limited or no zoom Compact (Intermediate) –Still fairly inexpensive –Creative presets –Better lens & sensor –5-9+ megapixels –3-4x zoom

6 Types of Digital Camera Ultra-compact –Very small (1” thick max) –Generally Inexpensive –Simple and convenient –Images not as good – megapixels –Limited or no zoom Compact (Intermediate) –Still fairly inexpensive –Creative presets –Better lens & sensor –5-9+ megapixels –3-4x zoom Prosumer (SLR-like, Ultra- zoom) –Better lenses –Longer zooms, 10x or more –View through the lenses –7-12+ megapixels –Attachable accessories –May have Image Stabilization

7 Types of Digital Camera Ultra-compact –Very small (1” thick max) –Generally Inexpensive –Simple and convenient –Images not as good – megapixels –Limited or no zoom Compact (Intermediate) –Still fairly inexpensive –Creative presets –Better lens & sensor –5-9+ megapixels –3-4x zoom Prosumer (SLR-like, Ultra- zoom) –Better lenses –Longer zooms, 10x or more –View through the lenses –7-12+ megapixels –Attachable accessories –May have Image Stabilization Professional –More manual control –Changeable Lenses –Up to megapixels –More creative options

8 Batteries Alkaline--cheaper, but drain in 1/2 hour Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) –Rechargeable –Environmentally friendly –Good for about 1,000+ charges –Don’t mix and match Lithium Ion –Camera specific –Good for about 500 charges AC adapter –Especially good while downloading Carry some spares (No battery = No pictures)

9 Memory Cards Each camera will require a specific type. They are not always interchangeable. Determine what you need. CF (Compact Flash)Compact Flash SD (Secure Digital)Secure Digital xD (Extreme Digital)Extreme Digital MS (Memory Stick)Memory Stick MMC (MultiMediaCard)MultiMediaCard SM (Smart Media)Smart Media

10 What size memory card do I need? This depends on how many megapixels your camera shoots per shot (look at camera specs). Shoot at highest resolution possible for maximum quality. 64MB256MB512MB1GB2GB 5 mp mp mp Card Size in megabytes Number of images that can be stored

11 How many megapixels do I need? More MP = Allows bigger, better images, and digital cropping of your pictures Shoot at highest resolution possible for maximum quality pictures and most control Megapixels needed (with no cropping) For screen display Megapixels needed For a snapshot (3x5) Megapixels needed For an 8 x Megapixels needed

12 Picture file formats Jpeg—suitable for , computer, Internet, printing –most common file type –loses crispness with each resizing, resaving –various levels of compression (good, better, best) Tiff—very good form for pictures to be printed –retain crispness and clarity best –larger file size –uncompressed (will not lose quality when edited) RAW—best for high end photography, printing –uncompressed, unprocessed image –must be edited with software Gif—suitable for Internet and line art –least clear but fastest loading on Internet –smallest file size

13 Archiving Photos A normal inkjet print may not last Save the original, unedited photo (like saving a negative) DVD’s can store up to 15,000 photo quality images (7 x more than regular CD’s) CD’s are more reliable and stable than DVD’s Gold foil disks last 100 years. Normal disks last years. Don’t leave images on computer w/o backing them up. Or...

14 Use Online Resources Digital photo albums like Picasa by Google –http://picasa.google.com/http://picasa.google.com/ Online hosting and photo albums like flickr –http://flickr.comhttp://flickr.com –http://flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/http://flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/ How does this work? –http://23thingsonastick.blogspot.com/2007/11/ thing-7-more-flickr-fun.htmlhttp://23thingsonastick.blogspot.com/2007/11/ thing-7-more-flickr-fun.html

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16 Outputting Pictures--dpi dpi = Dots per inch Higher the dpi, the better the resolution On Screen – 72/96 dpi Small Prints (3 x 5) dpi Larger Prints (5 x 7 and up) dpi

17 Printing Picture--300 vs 72 dpi

18 Test Area

19 Lowest ResolutionHighest Resolution 72 dpi300 dpi

20 Printing Tips Get a good printer –one that uses at least 4 colors –get highest dpi possible--some say 4800 x 1200 should be minimum standard Use photo paper –paper brand should match printer brand Allow 24 hours to dry before framing or scrapbooking Use a good editing program to improve photo before printing

21 with matching paper -- w/o matching paper

22 Basic Camera Use

23 Holding the Camera Hold camera with two hands Hold steady Tuck elbows in Have firm feet Hold breath, then press carefully Or use tripod

24 Turning On The Camera Shoot setting View setting

25 Focus the Camera Shutter button--depress 1/2 way and hold Use focus points Focus, hold and move to off-center subject

26 Zooming Optical Zoom –like film cameras –lens extends/contracts Digital Zoom –begins to crop into picture –lose overall image size/resolution –better to crop on computer OpticalDigital

27 Viewing Pictures Be sure camera is on view setting Use 4 way selector button to scroll through pictures –Left is back –Right is forward

28 Delete Pictures –Camera typically must be in play mode. –Pressing button deletes displayed image Intermediate features

29 Flash control –Camera in shoot mode –Usually a button that allows you to toggle through settings. –Settings appear as icons in window Intermediate features

30 Using a flash General Settings –automatic (It will fire when needed) –fill flash (It will fire but with less light) –red eye reduction (Strobes first, then fires) –off (Camera will adjust for shot w/o flash) Inside –only effective for about feet –use red-eye reduction setting if needed –flash off may result in blurrier pictures Outside –fill flash--w/in 5 feet in sun or on cloudy days –full flash--greater than 10 feet in sun –take portraits in shade with flash –may not need flash at all

31 Menu Options –Image quality/ resolution (good, better, best) –File type (Jpeg) –ISO (film speed) Understand Menu Options

32 Setting Film Speeds--ISO ISOSpeedUseGrain 100 Medium/Slow Outdoor or bright light Fine 400 Fast Indoor or dim Fast outdoor Medium 1600 Very Fast Very dark or fast (Sports indoor or at night) Course

33 Compensate For Low Light Shot at 400 speedShot at 1600 speed

34 Freeze Action Better Shot at 100 ISO Shot at 1600 ISO

35 Setting Film Speeds--ISO ISOSpeedUseGrain 100 Medium/Slow Outdoor or bright light Fine 400 Fast Indoor or dim Fast outdoor Medium 1600 Very Fast Very dark or fast (Sports indoor or at night) Course

36 Typical Setting Options Canon Rebel Olympus Most new point and shoots have menus with multiple presets.

37 Study the manual! Know Your Camera

38 Practice Turn camera on Hold the camera properly & Focus Take several pictures View them back Delete at least one picture Zoom in and out Try to take a picture with and w/o flash Open the menu and change the image quality to best Try to change the resolution, film speed, creative setting--Then restore original settings


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