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Confidential | VasheResearch.com Emergency Preparedness at Twin Cities Metro Food Service Establishments: An Outreach and Benchmark Survey Research Conducted.

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Presentation on theme: "Confidential | VasheResearch.com Emergency Preparedness at Twin Cities Metro Food Service Establishments: An Outreach and Benchmark Survey Research Conducted."— Presentation transcript:

1 Confidential | VasheResearch.com Emergency Preparedness at Twin Cities Metro Food Service Establishments: An Outreach and Benchmark Survey Research Conducted for Twin Cities Metro Advanced Practice Center (APC) for emergency preparedness and response A partnership of Hennepin County, Ramsey County and the City of Minneapolis February 2008

2 1 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Presentation Outline  Background and Objectives ●Executive Summary ●Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline ●Methods ●Results Conclusions and Recommendations

3 2 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Background and Objectives  Survey commissioned to assess the state of emergency preparedness and response at licensed food facilities in the Metro area.  Funded by the NACCHO Advanced Practice Centers Grant  Objectives: Assess food establishments’ emergency preparedness in the Metro area. Compare performance and identify progress and deficiencies from the baseline study (2005). Understand and evaluate respondents’ incorporation and implementation of the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers and other aids. Establish and evaluate effective means of emergency information dissemination to food establishment managers.

4 3 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Presentation Outline ●Background and Objectives  Executive Summary ●Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline ●Methods ●Results Conclusions and Recommendations

5 4 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Executive Summary Emergency Preparedness And Reporting Processes (Establishment  Government)  Two-thirds of restaurants and grocery stores claim to have an emergency plan in place.  This is an increase of 16% from  In case of an emergency such extensive flooding, managers are most likely to contact local officials and their management/owner.  In case of water contamination, over half of establishments would notify a governmental official.  Half of the establishments would shut down and get advice from the local government.  Practically all food establishments claim to have their lists of suppliers readily available (99%)  About 4 out of 5 establishments claim to have their back/loading doors locked all or almost all the time.  An 8% increase from  Almost all establishments claim to inspect their food deliveries for evidence of tampering.  As in 2005, the primary focus for inspection is not security, but inventory control…  Less than two-thirds of establishments admit to have never had a fire drill.  Only 1 in 4 establishments had a fire drill within the last 12 months. There is a slight increase (3%) from 2005.

6 5 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Executive Summary Emergency Alert Network (Government  Establishment)  Almost all managers (86%) are at least initially supportive of a self-inspection initiative.  Half of establishments indicate that they already perform a self-inspection, generally as a function of inventory control. These inspections are generally done at the multiple location/franchise level.  Small business lags in self-inspection, on average doing 10% less than multiple location businesses.  Nearly half of the managers spoken to say they have an evacuation or shelter-in-place plan.  Most respondents don’t receive a premium reduction on their insurance for food security self-inspections. Those that do are generally chain or multiple store businesses.

7 6 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Executive Summary Emergency Preparedness Training  Three quarters of establishments provide emergency training to their new hires. Up 3% from  In half of all cases, this training lasts less than 30 minutes.  Training is provided primarily on the job.  In approximately two-thirds of the time, this training lasts less than 1 hour.  Training is provided mostly on the job, by supervisor/co-worker.  A majority of respondents indicate they’ve seen emergency preparedness materials developed by Twin Cities organizations.  About half say that material is the Emergency Handbook for Food managers.  As with the study in 2005, almost all establishments want training materials in English, 42% of respondents would also like to have such materials in Spanish, as in 2005, other languages, such as Arabic, Chinese and Hmong are still needed.  There are a number of “second-tier” languages, Chinese, Arabic, Hmong and Somali, that could be prioritized.  Most (88%) respondents feel they have sufficient tools to report illness as required in the food code.  The most common tool used for reporting employee illness is an employee illness log (63%).  One in four indicate use of the Illness Log from the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers.  One in four indicate they don’t use anything.

8 7 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Executive Summary Differences By Segment  By geography: Ramsey County / St. Paul / Hennepin County / Minneapolis Similar response patterns across all geographies. While data displays some statistically significant differences, there is not much basis for differentiating managerial/decision-making approaches by geography. Displayed differences most likely due to the four geographies’ different food establishment demographic profiles. Two-thirds of respondents say there is an emergency plan that describes how their business will respond to emergencies.  By risk level: High versus Medium High-risk businesses primarily train their employees on the job. While overall adoption rate of the Emergency Handbook utilization is low in relation to other materials, it is used at a higher rate with high-risk businesses.

9 8 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Executive Summary Differences By Segment (continued)  By establishment type: Restaurants versus Grocery Stores Twice as many restaurants would like training materials in Spanish and Chinese, as compared to grocery stores; grocery stores have higher need for training materials in Arabic and Somali. Grocery stores cause stronger food safety concerns, as they are much more likely to have numerous suppliers, keep their kitchen/loading doors unlocked, provide less than 30 min of emergency training for new hires, and ignore the need for regular fire drills. Restaurants are more likely to use classroom settings for emergency training of new employees, and show much more interest in onsite training by Health Department.  By business size/type ( number of locations, privately owned/franchise/chain ) Multiple-location, multi-store chains are twice as likely to need training materials in Spanish than single-location, non-franchised businesses. Training materials in Chinese are most needed at single-location, non-franchised food establishments. Single-location, non-franchised businesses (which account for 56% of all food establishments in Metro area) present a stronger food safety concern, as they are much more likely to provide no or less than 30 minutes of emergency training for new hires, and ignore the need for regular fire drills. Large chains have increased since 2005.

10 9 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Presentation Outline ●Background and Objectives ●Executive Summary  Methods ●Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline ●Results ●Twin Cities Metro Area Total ●Results by quota groups/cross-tabs ● Geography view (by County/City) ● Risk Category view (High versus Medium risk) ● Establishment Type view (Restaurants versus Groceries) ● Ownership type/Number of locations (Chain/Non-chain, Single/Multiple locations) Conclusions and Recommendations

11 10 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Methods  Phone survey conducted in May 2007  Questionnaire developed by collaborative effort between Metro Team and Vashé Research, using questions posed in 2005 and added questions in  Survey’s population/universe defined as all food establishments in the Metro area, based on record lists provided by local governments.  Responses collected for each of the following quota groups: Four geographic areas: Ramsey County (other than City of St. Paul), City of St. Paul, Hennepin County (other than City of Minneapolis), City of Minneapolis Risk categorization: High versus Medium risk level Type of food establishment: Restaurants versus Grocery Stores

12 11 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Methods  All respondents qualified as in charge of food management and knowledgeable about their establishment’s emergency preparedness.  To increase response rate and reduce non-response bias, all surveyed managers were assured of confidentiality of their individual responses.  Results reported in aggregate only, no data linked to individual respondents  In addition to Metro-wide data, results shown in four different “views,” according to quota groups (Geography view, Risk Category view, Establishment Type view) and Ownership type/Number of locations (Question 1).  Assessment of Trends and Benchmark measures against 2005 baseline survey.

13 12 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Presentation Outline ●Background and Objectives ●Executive Summary ●Methods  Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline ●Results ●Twin Cities Metro Area Total ●Results by quota groups/cross-tabs ● Geography view (by County/City) ● Risk Category view (High versus Medium risk) ● Establishment Type view (Restaurants versus Groceries) ● Ownership type/Number of locations (Chain/Non-chain, Single/Multiple locations) Conclusions and Recommendations

14 13 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline Q1. Which one of the following categories best describes your business? n=436 A single (one) food establishment 2 or more food establishments but NOT franchise 2 or more food establishments AND franchise/large corporation %10% 20%  %11%17% Q3. If training materials were supplied to you by your local health agency, what languages should they be in so that your employees can understand the training? n=436 EnglishSpanishArabicChineseHmongSomaliVietnameseOromoLaotian %  42%7%4%5% 3%2%1% %42%7%5%4% 3%1% Q3a. Have you seen any of the following food safety/preparedness materials developed by the Twin Cities’ local agencies? n=358 Emergency Handbook for Food Managers Food Safety Self-Inspection List Food Safety & Security Self-Audit Tool Other %22%17%3% Q3D. Have you had an emergency situation, such as flooding, storm damage, power outage, fire or food tampering, etc. at your establishment within the past 2 years? n=436 YesNo %68% Q3E. Which of the following guidance materials did you follow, to keep food safe and to recover safely from the emergency? n=436 Emergency Handbook for Food Managers Food Security Self- Inspection Checklist Food Safety & Security Self-Audit Tool OtherNone %4%2%23%52% Q4a. If an emergency such as an illness outbreak occurred, would you be able to immediately provide a list of your food suppliers to local officials? n=436YesNo %1% %1%

15 14 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline Q4b. How many food suppliers do you currently have? n=433 1 to 56 to 10More than % 20%  10% %17%9% Q5A. If food tampering or other biological or chemical contamination of food occurs, often the best indicator of such an emergency is when an employee feels ill. Do you feel you have sufficient tools for recording and reporting employee illness? n=436 YesNo %12% Q5B. Which tools are you using for making decisions on, recording and reporting employee illness? n=384 Employee Illness Log Emergency Handbook for Food Mangers Call the City or County or State MDH Employee Illness Decision Tree & Poster for EmployeesNone %24%16%14%24% Q6. If you were notified that the drinking water supply (tap water) at your establishment was contaminated, what would you do? n=436 Shut down operations Call the City or County or State Use bottled water Call management / boss / owner Stop using/ serving water, ice, coffee %  53%  31%  7%4% %40%22%6% Q7. How often do you and your employees keep back doors into the kitchen area and loading dock doors locked when not in use? n=436AlwaysAlmost alwaysMost of the timeSome of the timeAlmost never Never %  10%  9%4%2%— %7%11%5%4%2%

16 15 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline Q8. How often do you inspect food deliveries to ensure no tampering or unexplained additions have been made? For example, checking for opened or unexplained packages, liquid or powder residue on packaging, returning suspicious or opened packages to supplier, etc.? n=436AlwaysAlmost alwaysMost of the timeSome of the timeAlmost never Never %6%2%1% — %8%2%0%1% Q8A. Do you self-inspect to evaluate and improve food safety and food security (e.g., using a Food Safety and Food Security Self-Inspection Checklist)? n=436 YesNo %46% Q8B. Do you receive a premium reduction from your property insurer for food security self inspection? n=436YesNo 20073%97% Q8C. How often do you self-inspect to evaluate and improve food safety and food security, for example, using a Food Safety and Food Security Self-Inspection Checklist? n=436DailyWeeklyMonthlyAlmost Never Only when the inspector comes Other 20071%59%30%1%6%3% Q8D. If the time commitment were reasonable, would you support and participate in a self-inspection initiative to reduce the total number of people getting sick with foodborne illnesses? n=436 Yes Initially supportiveInitially negativeNo %37%7%6% Q9. When was the last time you had a fire drill? n=436 Within the past 6 months Within the past yearMore than a yearNever %  3%9%60% %3%11%61%

17 16 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline Q9A. Do you have an evacuation or shelter-in-place plan for workers and customers in the event of an emergency such as a tornado, fire or chemical incident? n=436 YesNo %52% Q9B. Are you using the Emergency Readiness for Food Workers Photo Lessons included in the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers or other emergency training lessons to train your staff on what to do in an emergency? n=436YesNo %74% Q9C. What exactly are the materials that you are using? n=113 Emergency Handbook for Food Managers Other %15% Q10. Are newly hired employees trained on what to do in an emergency? n=436YesNo %22% %25% Q10B. Please describe the type of training. n=340On the job Classroom training Video Emergency Handbook CD or DVDWeb-basedOther %  24%  16%  10%6%1% %18%12%—3%0%1%

18 17 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline Q10C. Now please describe the length of this training. n=340 Less than 30 minutes 30 minutes to 1 hour1 to 2 hours2 to 4 hours4 to 8 hours More than 8 hours %20%16%11%5%6% %15%12%13%6%5% Q11A. Do you have an emergency plan for your establishment that describes how your business will respond to various emergencies? n=436 YesNo %  36% %54%

19 18 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Presentation Outline ●Background and Objectives ●Executive Summary ●Methods ●Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline  Results  Twin Cities Metro Area Total ●Results by quota groups/cross-tabs ● Geography view (by County/City) ● Risk Category view (High versus Medium risk) ● Establishment Type view (Restaurants versus Groceries) ● Ownership type/Number of locations (Chain/Non-chain, Single/Multiple locations) Conclusions and Recommendations

20 19 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Twin Cities Metro Area Total S2. Risk Category of establishment (this information is found with the establishment info.) Overall Risk category  The majority of establishments (65%) are high and medium risk restaurants.

21 20 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Twin Cities Metro Area Total Business category n=436  70% of respondents are from single food establishments, neither part of a large corporation or food chain. Q1. Which one of the following categories best describes your business? Base: Total respondents.

22 21 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Language Twin Cities Metro Area Total Language  English language is requested as the language most often needed for training materials.  There has been no net change in the need for Spanish since 2005, is continues to be the second top-tier language at 42%. English Spanish Arabic Chinese Hmong Somali Vietnamese Oromo Laotian Other Q3. If training materials were supplied to you by your local health agency, what languages should they be in so that your employees can understand the training? Base: Total respondents. % change from 2005

23 22 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q3a. Have you seen any of the following food safety/preparedness materials developed by the Twin Cities’ local agencies? Q3b. Do you have a copy of [name the item] in your food establishment? Base: Total respondents. Seen Food Safety/Preparedness Materials Developed by TC Local Agencies n=436 Has a Copy of in Establishment n=358 n=57 n=101 n=62 n=216 n=50n=82n=53n=192 Total Ramsey County St. PaulHennepin Minneapolis  A majority of respondents indicate they’ve seen food safety/preparedness materials developed by Twin Cities organizations.  The most recognized food safety material is the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers. County/City View (Food Safety Materials) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Emergency Handbook for Food Managers Food Security Self Inspection Checklist Food Safety & Security Self-Audit tool Other

24 23 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research County/City View (Food Safety Materials on hand) Twin Cities Metro Area Total  The majority of respondents indicate they have food safety/preparedness documents of some kind in their food establishments. Q3b. Do you have a copy of [name the item] in your food establishment? Base: Total respondents. n=57 n=101 n=62 n=216 Ramsey County St. PaulHennepin Minneapolis n=436 Total

25 24 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research County/City View (Safety Document Language(s)) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Q3C. In what language(s) is/are the (and safety document)? Language of Safety Documents  Most of these safety/preparedness documents are in English, with another 23% in Spanish.

26 25 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Experienced Emergency Situation In The Last Two Years  34% have indicated that they have experienced an emergency situation in the past two years. Q3D. Have you had an emergency situation, such as flooding, storm damage, power outage, fire or food tampering, etc. at your establishment within the past 2 years? Base: Total respondents. n=57 n=101 n=62 n=216 Ramsey County St. PaulHennepin Minneapolis

27 26 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q3E. Which of the following guidance materials did you follow, to keep food safe and to recover safely from the emergency? Guidance Materials Used During Emergency  Over half of the respondents indicate that they did not use any guidance materials during their emergency, and additional 23% cited other (phone book, contact info for refrigeration, etc.) guidance materials used.

28 27 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research  Less than 1% of respondents indicated they couldn’t readily supply a list of food suppliers (same in 2005).  Just under three quarters of food establishments have between 1 and 5 suppliers only. 1 to 5 6 to 10 More than 10 Q4a. If an emergency such as an illness outbreak occurred, would you be able to immediately provide a list of your food suppliers to local officials? Q4b. How many food suppliers do you currently have? Base: Total respondents. Ability to provide list of food suppliers n=436 Number of food suppliers n=433 Number of Food Suppliers Twin Cities Metro Area Total % change from 2005 (∆)

29 28 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Confident That S/He Has Enough Tools To Record and Report Illness  89% feel they have enough tools to record and report employee illness. Q5A. If food tampering or other biological or chemical contamination of food occurs, often the best indicator of such an emergency is when an employee feels ill. Do you feel you have sufficient tools for recording and reporting employee illness? Base: Total respondents. n=436

30 29 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q5B. Which tools are you using for making decisions on, recording and reporting employee illness? Tools Used To Record and Report Employee Illness Employee Illness Log Employee Illness Log in Emergency Handbook for Food Managers Call the City or County or State Health Department MN Dept of Health (MDH) Employee Illness Decision Tree & Poster for employees None  The most common tool cited for reporting employee illness is an employee illness log / Employee Illness Log in Emergency Handbook for Food Managers (87%). n=384

31 30 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research  In the event of water supply contamination, over half of the establishments would shut down operations, up 8% from  Additionally 53%, up 13% from 2005, would also contact government authorities.  Over half of food managers would also notify City, County or State officials, up 13% from Use bottled water for customer drinking water Shut down operations Post signs Call the City/County/State Q6. If you were notified that the drinking water supply (tap water) at your establishment was contaminated, what would you do? Base: Total respondents. What respondent would do if notified that water was contaminated n=436 Other Call Corporate / senior management Stop using/ serving water, ice, coffee Reaction to Water Contamination Twin Cities Metro Area Total

32 31 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Security—Establishment Q7. How often do you and your employees keep back doors into the kitchen area and loading dock doors locked when not in use? Q8. How often do you inspect food deliveries to ensure no tampering or unexplained additions have been made? For example, checking for opened or unexplained packages, liquid or powder residue on packaging, returning suspicious or opened packages to supplier, etc.? Kitchen area and loading dock doors locked when not in use Frequency of inspection food deliveries to ensure no tampering or unexplained additions have been made  The majority of the time (94%) respondents back door/kitchen area doors are locked when not in use: An increase of 8% from  Inspection of deliveries is common, 9 out of 10 times, to check for tampering, up 1% from  However, it is not clear that there is differentiation between inventory control and a safety inspection.  8% From 2005

33 32 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research County/City View (Security—Insurance) Twin Cities Metro Area Total—Frequency of Self-Inspection  The majority of respondents don’t receive a premium reduction on their insurance for food security self-inspections.  Those who do are large, multi-state, multi-chain stores. Q8B. Do you receive a premium reduction from your property insurer for food security self inspection? Base: Total respondents. n=57 n=101 n=62 n=216 Ramsey County St. PaulHennepin Minneapolis Premium reduction on insurance?

34 33 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research County/City View (Security—Self Inspection) Twin Cities Metro Area Total—Self-Inspection  On average, half of the respondents indicate they conduct a food safety and security self-inspection. Q8A. Do you self-inspect to evaluate and improve food safety and food security (e.g., using a Food Safety and Food Security Self-Inspection Checklist)? Base: Total respondents. n=57 n=101 n=62 n=216 Ramsey County St. PaulHennepin Minneapolis Self-Inspection done in business

35 34 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Total (Security—Self Inspection) Twin Cities Metro Area Total—Self-Inspection Q8C. How often do you self-inspect to evaluate and improve food safety and food security, for example, using a Food Safety and Food Security Self-Inspection Checklist? Daily Weekly Monthly Almost Never Only when inspector comes Other  59% report they self-inspect weekly. Nine out of ten inspect at least monthly.  Notably there is a fair percentage who only inspect when the inspector comes. Frequency of Self-Inspection

36 35 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Total (Security—Self Inspection) Twin Cities Metro Area Total—Self-Inspection Willingness to Participate In A Self-Inspection Yes Initially supportive, but need more information Initially negative, but need more information No  86% say they would be willing to participate, or are supportive of, a self-inspection initiative. Q8D. If the time commitment were reasonable, would you support and participate in a self-inspection initiative to reduce the total number of people getting sick with foodborne illnesses? Base: Total respondents.

37 36 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Emergency Plan Twin Cities Metro Area Total Q11A. Do you have an emergency plan for your establishment that describes how your business will respond to various emergencies? Establishment Has Emergency Plan  Nearly two-thirds of respondents say there is an emergency plan that describes how their business will respond to emergencies. n=57 n=101 n=62 n=216 Ramsey County St. PaulHennepin Minneapolis Yes 64% No 36%  18% From 2005

38 37 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Within the past 6 months Within the past year More than a year Never  Most establishments report never having a fire drill in their establishment.  Over one-fourth of establishments do have fire drills.  There is a slight increase from 2005 in the segment of respondents that indicate they have conducted a fire drill in the past year. Frequency of Fire Drills n=436 Q9. When was the last time you had a fire drill? Base: Total respondents. Fire Drill Frequency Twin Cities Metro Area Total  4% From 2005

39 38 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Twin Cities Metro Area Total (Shelter-In-Place) Q9A. Do you have an evacuation or shelter-in- place plan for workers and customers in the event of an emergency such as a tornado, fire or chemical incident?  48% of the respondents indicate they have an evacuation or shelter-in-place plan. Establishment has an evacuation or shelter-in-place plan n=436

40 39 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Emergency Readiness for Food Workers Photo Lessons Total Q9B. Are you using the Emergency Readiness for Food Workers Photo Lessons included in the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers or other emergency training lessons to train your staff on what to do in an emergency? Using the Emergency Readiness for Food Workers Photo Lessons  About a quarter indicate they are using the Emergency Readiness for Food Workers Photo Lessons to train their staff (26%). n=436

41 40 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Utilization of Emergency Handbook for Food Managers Total Q9C. What exactly are the materials that you are using? Materials Being Used  15% who say they have the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers say they use it for training their staff.  Respondents say they use materials like ServSafe and internal company procedures, as well as on-the-job training for their new hires. n=113

42 41 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research  Three quarters of establishments provide emergency training to their new hires.  In half of all cases, this training lasts less than 30 minutes, down 8% from  Training is provided primarily on the job. Emergency Handbook Video Other CD or DVD Classroom training Training type New hires trained? Less than 30 minutes 30 minutes to 1 hour More than 8 hours 1 to 2 hours 2 to 4 hours 4 to 8 hours Training length n=436 Q10. Are newly hired employees trained on what to do in an emergency? Q10B. Please describe the type of this training. Q10C. Now please describe the length of this training. Base: Total respondents. n=340 Web-based On the job Overall (Emergency Training) Twin Cities Metro Area Total  3% From 2005

43 42 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Presentation Outline ●Background and Objectives ●Executive Summary ●Methods ●Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline  Results ●Twin Cities Metro Area Total  Results by quota groups/cross-tabs ● Geography view (by County/City) ● Risk Category view (High versus Medium risk) ● Establishment Type view (Restaurants versus Groceries) ● Ownership type/Number of locations (Chain/Non-chain, Single/Multiple locations) Conclusions and Recommendations

44 43 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research n=436 n=57n=101n=62 N=216 Total Ramsey St. Paul Hennepin Minneapolis Medium / High Risk Grocery/ Restaurant Restaurant Grocery High risk Medium Risk RestaurantGrocery High Risk 66%44% Medium Risk 34%56% Food Business Demographics Twin Cities Metro Area Total  As in 2005, Hennepin County has a higher share of restaurants and high-risk food establishments (correlated attributes).

45 44 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research  Minneapolis and St. Paul have a higher share of single food establishments, while the counties have a higher share of franchises and establishment that are owned by large corporations. n=436 n=57n=101n=62 n=216 Q1. Which one of the following categories best describes your business? Base: Total respondents. Total RamseySt. PaulHennepin Minneapolis 42% 11% 47% County/City View (Business Type Ownership) Twin Cities Metro Area Total 2 or more food establishments AND a franchise of a large corporation A single (one) food establishment, and NOT a franchise of a large corporation or part of a chain 2 or more food establishments but NOT a franchise of a large corporation

46 45 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Risk Establishment type Q1. Which one of the following categories best describes your business? Base: Total respondents. n=260 n=176n=285n=151 High Medium Restaurant Grocery  Single food establishments have the highest share in both risk categories. Privately owned restaurants are the most common establishment type.  Franchises and food establishments of large corporations are most commonly grocery stores. Risk/Establishment View (Business Type Ownership) Twin Cities Metro Area Total 2 or more food establishments AND a franchise of a large corporation A single (one) food establishment, and NOT a franchise of a large corporation or part of a chain 2 or more food establishments but NOT a franchise of a large corporation

47 46 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q3. If training materials were supplied to you by your local health agency, what languages should they be in so that your employees can understand the training? Base: Total respondents. Languages English Spanish Arabic Chinese Hmong Somali Vietnamese Oromo Laotian Other n=436 n=57n=101n=62 n=216 Total Ramsey St. Paul Hennepin Minneapolis  Spanish continues to be the second language of choice metro-wide. As found in the previous wave, Arabic, Chinese and Hmong are languages needed in different areas of the metro.  Arabic is more common in Minneapolis and St. Paul than in the counties.  Chinese is predominant in Minneapolis and Hennepin County.  Hmong is predominant in St. Paul and Ramsey County.  Somali is predominant in Minneapolis County/City View (Language) Twin Cities Metro Area Total

48 47 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q3. If training materials were supplied to you by your local health agency, what languages should they be in so that your employees can understand the training? Base: Total respondents. Languages English Spanish Arabic Chinese Hmong Somali Vietnamese Oromo Laotian Other Risk Establishment type  Spanish language continues to be the second language choice across all segments, with a slightly increased need in restaurants (from 2005) and high risk establishments.  Chinese and Hmong rank high as second tier languages in the high risk and restaurant categories. Risk/Establishment View (Language) Twin Cities Metro Area Total n=174 n=205n=196n=183 High Medium Restaurant Grocery

49 48 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q3. If training materials were supplied to you by your local health agency, what languages should they be in so that your employees can understand the training? Base: Total respondents. Languages English Spanish Chinese Arabic Hmong Somali Vietnamese Oromo Laotian Other  Again, second language choice is Spanish, with a need that is even across all channels.  Arabic, Chinese, Hmong and Somali are second-tier languages that are needed by single food establishments and chains with more than two locations. Chinese ranks highest in single food establishments. Ownership View (Language) Twin Cities Metro Area Total n=244 n=49n=143 Single food establishment More than 2 locations, not a chain More than 2 locations, chain

50 49 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research 1 to 5 6 to 10 More than 10 Q4a. If an emergency such as an illness outbreak occurred, would you be able to immediately provide a list of your food suppliers to local officials? Q4b. How many food suppliers do you currently have? Base: Total respondents. Ability to provide list of food suppliers Number of food suppliers n=57 n=101 n=62 n=216 n=57n=101n=62n=216 Ramsey County St. PaulHennepin Minneapolis  While the overall distribution is similar across all geographic areas, food establishments in Hennepin County are more likely to have a higher number of suppliers.  Likely because an increased number of grocery stores. County/City View (Number of Food Suppliers) Twin Cities Metro Area Total

51 50 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research 1 to 5 6 to 10 More than 10 Q4a. If an emergency such as an illness outbreak occurred, would you be able to immediately provide a list of your food suppliers to local officials? Q4b. How many food suppliers do you currently have? Base: Total respondents. Ability to provide list of food suppliers n=260 Number of food suppliers n=260 n=176 n=285 n=151 n=176n=285n=151 High Medium RestaurantGrocery Risk Establishment type Risk/Establishment View (Number of Food Suppliers) Twin Cities Metro Area Total  Grocery stores tend to have more food suppliers.

52 51 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research 1 to 5 6 to 10 More than 10 Q4a. If an emergency such as an illness outbreak occurred, would you be able to immediately provide a list of your food suppliers to local officials? Q4b. How many food suppliers do you currently have? Base: Total respondents. Ability to provide list of food suppliers Number of food suppliers n=244 n=49n=143 n=244 n=49n=143 Single food establishment More than 2 locations not a chain More than 2 locations, chain  Companies that are single food establishments or more than 2 locations, non-chain, are more likely to have a very limited number of suppliers; a lot of them report having only one or two. Ownership View (Number of Food Suppliers) Twin Cities Metro Area Total

53 52 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research MDH Employee Illness Tree and poster Employee Illness Log Illness Log in Emergency Handbook for Food Managers Has Tools for Illness Reporting Tools used n=57 n=101 n=62 n=216 n=57n=101n=62n=216 Ramsey County St. PaulHennepin Minneapolis  The most commonly used tool for reporting illness is the Employee Illness Log.  In each geographic category except St. Paul “None” is cited a quarter of the time. County/City View (Tools for Illness Reporting) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Q5A. If food tampering or other biological or chemical contamination of food occurs, often the best indicator of such an emergency is when an employee feels ill. Do you feel you have sufficient tools for recording and reporting employee illness? Base: Total respondents. Call City/County/State HD None

54 53 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q5A. If food tampering or other biological or chemical contamination of food occurs, often the best indicator of such an emergency is when an employee feels ill. Do you feel you have sufficient tools for recording and reporting employee illness? Base: Total respondents. n=260 n=176 n=285 n=151 High Medium RestaurantGrocery Risk Establishment type Risk/Establishment View (Tools for Illness Reporting) Twin Cities Metro Area Total  Again, the Employee Illness Log is the primary tool used to report illness. One in four use the Emergency Handbook, while another quarter indicate they have “None.” Tools for Illness Reporting Tools used MDH Employee Illness Tree and poster Employee Illness Log Emergency Handbook for Food Managers n=229n=162n=262n=128 Call City/County/State HD None

55 54 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Tools for Illness Reporting n=244 n=49n=143 Single food establishment More than 2 locations not a chain More than 2 locations, chain  Employee Illness log is the most commonly used. The Emergency Handbook for Food Managers is used 25% of the time. Ownership View (Tools for Illness Reporting) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Q5A. If food tampering or other biological or chemical contamination of food occurs, often the best indicator of such an emergency is when an employee feels ill. Do you feel you have sufficient tools for recording and reporting employee illness? Base: Total respondents. Tools used MDH Employee Illness Tree and poster Employee Illness Log Emergency Handbook for Food Managers n=229n=162n=262 Call City/County/State HD None

56 55 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research n=436 n=57 n=101 n=62n=216 Total RamseySt. PaulHennepinMinneapolis Preferred way to respond to water contamination alert Q6. If you were notified that the drinking water supply (tap water) at your establishment was contaminated, what would you do? Base: Total respondents. Shut down operations Call the City/ County/State Use bottled water Call Corporate / senior management Stop using/ serving water, ice, coffee Boil water  Over half of establishments would shut down and call the City, County or State in the event of water contamination. County/City View (Water Contamination) Twin Cities Metro Area Total

57 56 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research HighMediumRestaurantGrocery Risk Establishment type Risk/Establishment View (Water Contamination) Twin Cities Metro Area Total  Over half of establishments would shut down and call the City, County or State in the event of water contamination. Action taken if notified that water was contaminated n=260 n=176 n=285 n=151 Q6. If you were notified that the drinking water supply (tap water) at your establishment was contaminated, what would you do? Base: Total respondents. Use bottled water for customer drinking water Shut down operations Call the City or County or State Other Call Corporate / senior management Stop using/ serving water, ice, coffee

58 57 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Action taken if notified that water was contaminated Single food establishment More than 2 locations not a chain More than 2 locations, chain  Over half of establishments would shut down and call the City, County or State in the event of water contamination. Ownership View (Water Contamination) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Q6. If you were notified that the drinking water supply (tap water) at your establishment was contaminated, what would you do? Base: Total respondents. HighMediumRestaurant Use bottled water for customer drinking water Shut down operations Call the City or County or State Other Call Corporate / senior management Stop using/ serving water, ice, coffee n=244 n=49n=143

59 58 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research n=436 n=57n=101n=62n=91 Total Ramsey St. Paul HennepinMinneapolis Frequency of back doors/loading doors locked Always Almost always Most of the time Some of the time Almost never Q7. How often do you and your employees keep back doors into the kitchen area and loading dock doors locked when not in use? Base: Total respondents.  3 out of 4 respondents keep back doors locked when not in use. Over 95% of the time the response is at a minimum “Most of the time.” County/City View (Security—Establishment) Twin Cities Metro Area Total

60 59 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research HighMediumRestaurantGrocery Risk Establishment type Risk/Establishment View (Security—Establishment) Twin Cities Metro Area Total  3 out of 4 respondents keep back doors locked when not in use. Over 95% of the time the response is at a minimum “Most of the time.” Action taken if notified that water was contaminated n=260 n=176 n=285 n=151 Always Almost always Most of the time Some of the time Almost never Q7. How often do you and your employees keep back doors into the kitchen area and loading dock doors locked when not in use? Base: Total respondents.

61 60 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q7. How often do you and your employees keep back doors into the kitchen area and loading dock doors locked when not in use? Base: Total respondents. n=244 Single food establishment  3 out of 4 respondents keep back doors locked when not in use. Over 95% of the time the response is at a minimum “Most of the time.” Ownership View (Security—Establishment) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Always Almost always Most of the time Some of the time Almost never Frequency of Checking Deliveries More than 2 locations not a chain More than 2 locations, chain n=49 n=143

62 61 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research n=436 n=57n=101n=62n=91 Total Ramsey St. Paul HennepinMinneapolis Frequency of Checking Deliveries Always Almost always Most of the time Some of the time Almost never Q8. How often do you inspect food deliveries to ensure no tampering or unexplained additions have been made? For example, checking for opened or unexplained packages, liquid or powder residue on packaging, returning suspicious or opened packages to supplier, etc.? Base: Total respondents.  A high rate of establishments check their deliveries: Nearly 9 out of 10.  Although “tampering” is stated directly to the respondent, my opinion is that the priority in checking deliveries is primarily a function of inventory control, not emergency preparedness. County/City View (Security—Inspection) Twin Cities Metro Area Total

63 62 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research HighMediumRestaurantGrocery Risk Establishment type Risk/Establishment View (Security—Inspection) Twin Cities Metro Area Total  A high rate of establishments check their deliveries: Greater than 9 out of 10. Large corporations and groceries often have a specific position responsible for receiving shipments. Frequency of Checking Deliveries n=260 n=176 n=285 n=151 Always Almost always Most of the time Some of the time Almost never Q8. How often do you inspect food deliveries to ensure no tampering or unexplained additions have been made? For example, checking for opened or unexplained packages, liquid or powder residue on packaging, returning suspicious or opened packages to supplier, etc.? Base: Total respondents.

64 63 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Ownership View (Security—Inspection) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Always Almost always Most of the time Some of the time Almost never Q8. How often do you inspect food deliveries to ensure no tampering or unexplained additions have been made? For example, checking for opened or unexplained packages, liquid or powder residue on packaging, returning suspicious or opened packages to supplier, etc.? Base: Total respondents. Frequency of Checking Deliveries n=244 Single food establishment More than 2 Locations, not a chain More than 2 locations, chain n=49 n=143  A high rate of establishments check their deliveries: Nearly 9 out of 10.  Although “tampering” is stated directly to the respondent, my opinion is that the priority in checking deliveries is primarily a function of inventory control, not emergency preparedness.

65 64 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research n=436 n=57n=101n=62n=91 Total Ramsey St. Paul HennepinMinneapolis Frequency of Self-Inspection Q8C. How often do you self-inspect to evaluate and improve food safety and food security, for example, using a Food Safety and Food Security Self-Inspection Checklist? Base: Total respondents.  Over half of respondents self-inspect on a weekly basis.  Daily inspections using food safety material is rarely done. The low numbers in this category perhaps indicate that the people who are receiving shipments are not evaluating how to improve the food safety and security aspect of the delivery. County/City View (Security—Self Inspection) Twin Cities Metro Area Total—Frequency of Self-Inspection Monthly Daily Weekly Other Almost never Only when inspector comes

66 65 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research HighMediumRestaurantGrocery Risk Establishment type Risk/Establishment View (Security—Self Inspection) Frequency of Self-inspection  Again, self-inspections are more commonly done on a weekly or monthly basis.  Daily inspections using food safety material is rarely done. The low numbers in this category perhaps indicate that the people who are receiving shipments are not evaluating how to improve the food safety and security aspect of the delivery. n=260 n=176 n=285 n=151 Monthly Daily Weekly Other Almost never Only when inspector comes Frequency of Self-Inspection Q8C. How often do you self-inspect to evaluate and improve food safety and food security, for example, using a Food Safety and Food Security Self-Inspection Checklist? Base: Total respondents.

67 66 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Frequency of Self-Inspection  The majority of establishments inspect on a weekly and monthly basis.  Daily inspections using food safety material is rarely done. The low numbers in this category perhaps indicate that the people who are receiving shipments are not evaluating how to improve the food safety and security aspect of the delivery. Ownership View (Security—Self Inspection) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Monthly Daily Weekly Other Almost never Only when inspector comes Q8C. How often do you self-inspect to evaluate and improve food safety and food security, for example, using a Food Safety and Food Security Self-Inspection Checklist? Base: Total respondents. n=244 Single food establishment More than 2 locations not a chain More than 2 locations, chain n=49 n=143

68 67 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research n=436 n=57n=101n=62n=91 Total Ramsey St. Paul HennepinMinneapolis Supports a Self-Inspection Initiative Yes Initially supportive, but need more information Initially negative, but need more information Some of the time Q8D. If the time commitment were reasonable, would you support and participate in a self-inspection initiative to reduce the total number of people getting sick with foodborne illnesses? Base: Total respondents.  A majority, 8 in 10, in all geographies, are open to a self-inspection initiative. County/City View (Self-Inspection Initiative) Twin Cities Metro Area Total

69 68 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research HighMediumRestaurantGrocery Risk Establishment type Risk/Establishment View (Self-Inspection Initiative) Twin Cities Metro Area Total  Most are open to a self-inspection initiative. n=260 n=176 n=285 n=151 Q8D. If the time commitment were reasonable, would you support and participate in a self-inspection initiative to reduce the total number of people getting sick with foodborne illnesses? Base: Total respondents. Supports a Self-Inspection Initiative Yes Initially supportive, but need more information Initially negative, but need more information Some of the time

70 69 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research  The majority of establishments are open to a self-inspection initiative. Ownership View (Self-Inspection Initiative) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Q8D. If the time commitment were reasonable, would you support and participate in a self-inspection initiative to reduce the total number of people getting sick with foodborne illnesses? Base: Total respondents. Supports a Self-Inspection Initiative n=244 Single food establishment More than 2 locations not a chain More than 2 locations, chain n=49 n=143 Yes Initially supportive, but need more information Initially negative, but need more information Some of the time

71 70 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research State duty officer Local health dept. 911 Other n=436 n=57n=101n=62 n=216 Total RamseySt. PaulHennepin Minneapolis Called first: Utility company Q11a. Do you have an emergency plan for your establishment that describes how your business will respond to various emergencies? Q11b. If you had an emergency at your food establishment today, such as extensive flooding, who would you call first for help? Base: Total respondents. Has emergency plan Corporate/Senior Mgmt./Boss  In the event of extensive flooding, all geographies report they would first contact their boss followed by contacting their local health department. County/City View (Emergency Plan / Contacts) Twin Cities Metro Area Total

72 71 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Called first: Has emergency plan Ownership Type View (Emergency Plan / Contacts) Twin Cities Metro Area Total  Single food establishments are least likely to have an emergency plan in their establishment.  In the event of extensive flooding, primarily the local health department, followed by their boss or management, would be contacted first. State duty officer Local health dept. 911 Other Utility company Corporate/Senior Mgmt./Boss Q11a. Do you have an emergency plan for your establishment that describes how your business will respond to various emergencies? Q11b. If you had an emergency at your food establishment today, such as extensive flooding, who would you call first for help? Base: Total respondents. n=244 Single food establishment More than 2 locations not a chain More than 2 locations, chain n=49 n=143

73 72 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Frequency of Fire Drills n=436 n=57n=101 n=62 n=216 Total Ramsey St. Paul Hennepin Minneapolis Within the past 6 months Within the past year More than a year Never  Ramsey County has the largest share of respondents that have fire drills (35%). As with the 2005 study, one possible explanation may be because it contains a larger number of day care centers. County/City View (Fire Drills) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Q9. When was the last time you had a fire drill? Base: Total respondents.

74 73 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Within the past 6 months Within the past year More than a year Never n=260 n=176 n=285 n=151 High Medium Restaurant Grocery Frequency of Fire Drills  There is generally an even distribution in regard to the number of respondents that have had fire drills in respect to risk and establishment type. Risk/Establishment View (Fire Drills) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Q9. When was the last time you had a fire drill? Base: Total respondents. 2007

75 74 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q9. When was the last time you had a fire drill? Base: Total respondents. Within the past 6 months Within the past year More than a year Never n=244 n=49n=143 Single food establishment More than 2 locations non-chain More than 2 locations, chain Frequency of Fire Drills  Again, even distribution in the ownership view. Ownership View (Fire Drills) Twin Cities Metro Area Total 2007

76 75 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q9A. Do you have an evacuation or shelter-in-place plan for workers and customers in the event of an emergency such as a tornado, fire or chemical incident? Base: Total respondents. n=57 n=101 n=62 n=216 Ramsey County St. PaulHennepin Minneapolis  In most cases, about half of the respondents indicate they have a shelter-in-place plan for workers and customers.  This is less likely in single food establishments and more likely in grocery stores. Overall View ( Shelter-In-Place Plan ) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Has evacuation or shelter-in-place plan n=260 n=176 n=285 n=151 High Medium RestaurantGrocery n=244 n=49n=143 Single food establishment More than 2 locations not a chain More than 2 locations, chain

77 76 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q9B. Are you using the Emergency Readiness for Food Workers Photo Lessons included in the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers or other emergency training lessons to train your staff on what to do in an emergency? Base: Total respondents. n=57 n=101 n=62 n=216 Ramsey County St. PaulHennepin Minneapolis  More restaurants and high risk establishments report using the ER for Food Workers in the EH for Food Managers than other categories.  Hennepin County and Minneapolis are more likely to use the handbook for emergencies. Emergency Readiness for Food Workers Photo Lessons All Geographies, Risk and Ownership Uses Emergency Readiness for Food Workers Photo Lessons n=260 n=176 n=285 n=151 High Medium RestaurantGrocery n=244 n=49n=143 Single food establishment More than 2 locations not a chain More than 2 locations, chain

78 77 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Q9C. What exactly are the materials that you are using? Base: Total respondents. n=57 n=101 n=62 n=216 Ramsey County St. PaulHennepin Minneapolis  High-risk, restaurant and more than 2 locations, non chain, along with Minneapolis are the highest users of the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers.  Overall adoption rate of the Emergency Handbook is low compared to other materials. Many cite materials such as internal resources or ServSafe for training.  Lowest adoption rate occurs with Grocery stores and Ramsey County. Materials Used All Geographies, Risk and Ownership Utilization of Emergency Handbook for Food Managers n=260 n=176 n=285 n=151 High Medium RestaurantGrocery n=244 n=49n=143 Single food establishment More than 2 Locations, not a chain More than 2 locations, chain

79 78 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Video Emergency Handbook Other CD or DVD Classroom training Less than 30 minutes 30 minutes to 1 hour More than 8 hours 1 to 2 hours 2 to 4 hours 4 to 8 hours Q10. Are newly hired employees trained on what to do in an emergency? Q10B. Please describe the type of this training. Q10C. Now please describe the length of this training Base: Total respondents. Web based On the job New hires trained n=436 n=57 n=101n=62n=91 Total Ramsey St. PaulHennepinMinneapolis Training type Training length: n=44 n=81 n=52n=71 n=340  New hires are trained around the same rate: Slightly higher than 3 of 4 times. Hennepin County shows the highest rate while Minneapolis shows the lowest.  On the job training is the most common method of training.  Classroom training occurs frequently County/City View (Emergency Training) Twin Cities Metro Area Total

80 79 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Video Other CD or DVD Classroom training Less than 30 minutes 30 minutes to 1 hour More than 8 hours 1 to 2 hours 2 to 4 hours 4 to 8 hours Q10. Are newly hired employees trained on what to do in an emergency? Q10B. Please describe the type of this training. Q10C. Now please describe the length of this training Base: Total respondents. Web based On the job New hires trained Training length: n=34 n=68 n=188 Training type, n=305  New hires are trained the most with chain and franchised businesses  On the job and classroom training occurs most frequent across all ownership types. Ownership View (Emergency Training) Twin Cities Metro Area Total Emergency Handbook n=244 n=49n=143 Single food establishment More than 2 locations non-chain More than 2 locations, chain

81 80 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Presentation Outline ●Background and Objectives ●Executive Summary ●Methods ●Trends: Benchmark Against Baseline ●Results ●Conclusions and Recommendations

82 81 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research  Promote training and resources via local health inspectors with an emphasis placed on high-risk restaurants.  Encourage utilization of the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers for training and emergencies. Place emphasis on the different components that make up the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers.  The majority of establishments see the value in the internal evaluation of food safety systems. Work in the area with establishments via local health inspectors.  Consider conducting a qualitative study (focus groups or in-depth interviews) with owners and managers of multi-cultural food establishments, to gain a deeper understanding of their needs and preferences for services in languages other than English such as notification, information, training, etc. Conclusions and Recommendations

83 82 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research  Prioritize development of language materials: 1) English; 2) Spanish; 3) Arabic and Chinese. Secure collaboration with multiple-location food companies in developing training seminars and other materials in Spanish.  Food security topics should be delivered through existing food safety channels, delivered by printed materials, onsite evaluations and training. Emphasis should be on topics such as self-inspection. Conclusions and Recommendations

84 83 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Weighting Scheme Twin Cities Metro Area Total GeographyRisk Establishment Restaurants Grocery Unweighted Weighted High risk Medium Risk St. Paul Minneapolis Ramsey Hennepin

85 84 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Confidential | VasheResearch.com CONTACTS Hennepin County, Susan Palchik , Ramsey County, Zack Hansen , City of Minneapolis, Curt Fernandez ,

86 85 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research  Promote training and resources via local health inspectors with an emphasis placed on high-risk restaurants.  Encourage utilization of the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers for training and emergencies. Place emphasis on the different components that make up the Emergency Handbook for Food Managers.  The majority of establishments see the value in the internal evaluation of food safety systems. Work in the area with establishments via local health inspectors.  Consider conducting a qualitative study (focus groups or in-depth interviews) with owners and managers of multi-cultural food establishments, to gain a deeper understanding of their needs and preferences for services in languages other than English such as notification, information, training, etc. Preparedness at Food Service Conclusions and Recommendations

87 86 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research  Prioritize development of language materials: 1) English; 2) Spanish; 3) Arabic and Chinese. Secure collaboration with multiple-location food companies in developing training seminars and other materials in Spanish.  Food security topics should be delivered through existing food safety channels, delivered by printed materials, onsite evaluations and training. Emphasis should be on topics such as self-inspection. Preparedness at Food Service Conclusions and Recommendations

88 87 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Preparedness at Food Service (Vashé Research, 2007 vs. 2005)  34% of Twin Cities Metro FMs said they’d had an emergency situation within past 2 years (e.g. flooding, storm damage, power outage, fire or food tampering).  64% said they have an emergency plan, up from 46%.  48% said they have an exit plan.  31% said they’d had a fire drill in past year, up from 28%; 60% never have had a drill.

89 88 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Preparedness—Continued  53% claimed they would call local or state PH in an emergency, up from 40%.  99% said they are able to immediately provide a list of their food suppliers in event of an illness outbreak, as in  78% said they are training new hires on what to do in an emergency, up 3% from  50% training on the job is down from 60% in Classroom & other forms of training are on the rise  41% of training lasts a half hour or less, vs. 49% in 2005.

90 89 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Preparedness Tools (Vashé, 2007)  Metro FMs said they had seen the following resources: ‒ 48% Emergency Handbook for Food Managers (pub Fall 2005) ‒ 22% Food Security Self Inspection Checklist (pub Fall 2005) ‒ 17% Food Safety & Security Self Audit Checklist (out Nov 2006)  Of the 34% who had experienced an emergency in past 2 years, use of APC guidance was: ‒ 19% Emergency Handbook ‒ 6% Food Safety & Security Checklists ‒ 52% no guidance used  22% said they use the Emergency Handbook Photo Lessons to train staff, and 4% more use other training lessons ‒ Corporate, ServSafe…

91 90 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Food Security (Vashé, 2007 v 2005)  54% said they self inspect for food safety and food security, and 89% of these self-inspect either weekly or monthly.  85% said they lock back doors and loading docks always or almost always, up 8% from  89% said they inspect food deliveries to ensure no tampering, however the surveyor suspects that as in 2005 most inspect for inventory control and theft rather than for tampering.  88% feel they have sufficient tools for reporting employee illnesses as an early warning of tampering.

92 91 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Food Security—Continued  99% said they could provide their supplier list immediately if an illness outbreak as in 2005, even with the number of food suppliers on the increase.  A small percent claim to receive a premium reduction from their property insurer for food security self-inspection. ‒ Surveyor notes that actual percent is soft because many respondents were not in charge of insurances.

93 92 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Self Inspection (Vashé, 2007)  54% said they self inspect for food safety and food security.  89% of those who do, self inspect either weekly or monthly.  86% support or initially support a self-inspection initiative.

94 93 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Twin Cities Metro Food Service Demographics (Vashé, 2007)  70% are single facility, small businesses, comparable to 2005 although chains are increasing.  The top 5 translation language needs for training staff remain the same as in 2005: ‒ Spanish at 42%, higher in Minneapolis & St. Paul. ‒ Arabic 7%, higher in Minneapolis & St. Paul. ‒ Hmong 5%, highest outside of Minneapolis. ‒ Somali 5%, higher in Minneapolis. ‒ Chinese 4%.  Emerging: Vietnamese, Oromo and Lao

95 94 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research References  Emergency Preparedness at Twin Cities Metro Retail Food Establishments: An Outreach and Baseline Survey. ‒ Vashé Research for Twin Cities Metro APC, April 2005, a phone survey of food managers, n=379, universe=4,181.  Emergency Preparedness at Twin Cities Metro Food Service Establishments: An Outreach and Benchmark Survey. ‒ Vashé Research for Twin Cities Metro APC, Oct. 2007, a phone survey of food managers, n=436, universe=4,568.

96 95 | Confidential to VASHÉ Research Twin Cities Metro APC The Twin Cities Metro Advanced Practice Center (APC) is a Minnesota partnership of Hennepin County, St. Paul-Ramsey County and the City of Minneapolis. It is one of eight centers nationally funded by the National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO) in collaboration with CDC to strengthen public health emergency preparedness. Since 2004, this center has developed environmental health emergency preparedness resources for workforce training & response, government and regulated businesses, and a multicultural general public. All products are available at HENNEPIN COUNTYST. PAUL-RAMSEY C OUNTY Susan Palchick, EH ManagerZach Hansen, EH Director Brian Golob, Sr. EnvironmentalistCheryl Armstrong, Program Analyst CITY OF MINNEAPOLIS Curt Fernandez, Food Safety Manager Tim Jenkins, Food Safety Supervisor Susan Kulstad, Contractor


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