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“POWER” FEB. 11 TH & 12 TH, 2014 Ch 8 – Work, Power, & Energy.

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Presentation on theme: "“POWER” FEB. 11 TH & 12 TH, 2014 Ch 8 – Work, Power, & Energy."— Presentation transcript:

1 “POWER” FEB. 11 TH & 12 TH, 2014 Ch 8 – Work, Power, & Energy

2 B DAY Do Now 1. Take a Do Now and complete Tonight’s HW Read & Study 8.2 ; Complete #5 and p. 119 – 120. B DAY HW Due Read & Study 8.1; Complete #1-4 p. 119 Please place in In Box

3 We are going to review… The Do Now/Exit Slip CHART from last class. Add any necessary comments / corrections to the last column! Ask any questions you have!

4 IS IT WORK? A teacher applies a force to a wall and becomes exhausted. Show me your answer (hands up) 1. YES 2. NO 3. NOT QUITE SURE… & that’s OK!

5 IS IT WORK? A teacher applies a force to a wall and becomes exhausted. No. This is not an example of work. The wall is not displaced. A force must cause a displacement in order for work to be done.

6 IS IT WORK? A book falls off a table and free falls to the ground. Show me your answer (hands up) 1. YES 2. NO 3. NOT QUITE SURE… & that’s OK!

7 IS IT WORK? A book falls off a table and free falls to the ground. Yes. This is an example of work. There is a force (gravity) which acts on the book which causes it to be displaced in a downward direction (i.e., "fall").

8 IS IT WORK? A waiter carries a tray full of meals above his head by one arm straight across the room at constant speed. Show me your answer (hands up) 1. YES 2. NO 3. NOT QUITE SURE… & that’s OK!

9 IS IT WORK? A waiter carries a tray full of meals above his head by one arm straight across the room at constant speed. No. This is not an example of work. There is a force (the waiter pushes up on the tray) and there is a displacement (the tray is moved horizontally across the room). Yet the force does not cause the displacement. To cause a displacement, there must be a component of force in the direction of the displacement.

10 IS IT WORK? A rocket accelerates through space. Show me your answer (hands up) 1. YES 2. NO 3. NOT QUITE SURE… & that’s OK!

11 IS IT WORK? A rocket accelerates through space. Yes. This is an example of work. There is a force (the expelled gases push on the rocket) which causes the rocket to be displaced through space.

12 IS IT WORK? Bruno Mars sings during the halftime show Show me your answer (hands up) 1. YES 2. NO 3. NOT QUITE SURE… & that’s OK!

13 IS IT WORK? Bruno Mars sings during the halftime show Depends on your EXPLANATION! Nothing mentioned about him MOVING, so it could be no… Or, you spin it so that his vocal cords are doing work, or his jaw muscles… All depends on your comments!

14 Your Role Now… In groups, create 1 or 2 mini skits to present to the class. You all must participate in some way, whether it is in the skit or as a narrator. Your skit(s) must demonstrate and narrate the following: 1. One scenario must show an example in which it may appear work is being done (to the non physics student!) but it is not 2. The other scenario must show an example in which work is being done.

15 EVERYONE must participate in some way! 1. Looks like work is being done… but is NOT work 2. Work IS being done You MUST specify: the FORCE doing the work, the DISPLACEMENT caused by the work, and the OBJECT on which work is being done, along with any other relevant information, such as…  is the force working against another force? If so, what?  Is the force changing the object’s velocity? How so? Your choice if you want 2 separate skits, or one continued scene, to demonstrate #1-2

16 In Your Notes Fill in your chart based on what you see!

17 Guided Notes from LAST CLASS Take them out We are finishing them Pay attention and ask questions if you are lost!

18 Math… 1. Complete #1-2, and check in with a teacher 2. Complete #3 – check in for help if needed 3. Complete the remainder of the page and check online by visiting: 4

19 I want to survey your thoughts… On TODAY’S Do Now

20 I want to survey your thoughts… 1. Scenario 1 2. Scenario 2 3. Same in Both Fist – not quite sure

21 I want to survey your thoughts… 1. Scenario 1 2. Scenario 2 3. Same in Both Fist – not quite sure

22 I want to survey your thoughts… 1. Scenario 1 2. Scenario 2 3. Same in Both Fist – not quite sure

23 Work is the product of the force and the distance, provided they both act in the same direction. When a person runs up stairs…  the force lifted is the person’s weight (Newton's),  and the distance is the vertical distance moved (height in meters) – not the distance along the stairs. Let’s take a closer look at #1…

24 I want to survey your thoughts… WORK is Force x Distance Is your WEIGHT any different in either scenario? So, is the FORCE you are lifting any different? And you’re doing work against gravity…in what direction does gravity act? So, you’re doing work AGAINST gravity by moving UP…is the vertical distance you move any different in either scenario? SAME WORK IN BOTH… today’s class focuses on why, however, you are more tired if you run up the stairs.

25 Using the info in the boxes, complete #1-2 …may work with the people around you

26 Volunteers to share? How fast work is completed Work divided by time How quickly work can be completed

27 Volunteers to share? Power = Work Time P = W t Units = Joule second Watt = Joule second

28 Volunteers to share? Power = Work Time P = W t Watt = Joule second Corny Joke Memory Aid! WATT does a POWERFUL businessperson do? They WORK over TIME!!!

29 James Watt Watt’s improvements to the steam engine were a significant factor in the Industrial Revolution, and when the Watt engine was paired with Thomas Edison’s electrical generator in the late 19th century, the generation of electricity on a large scale was possible for the first time. Retrieved from

30 Watt coined the term “horsepower” Watt didn’t invent the steam engine, but he did make HUGE improvements on it, which provided a reason to compare the output of horses with that of the engines that could replace them…how else would companies be able to market and sell them? It also was used in selling the “horseless carriage.” Retrieved from

31 Watt coined the term “horsepower” A now-famous ‘horseless carriage’ producer was Henry Ford. Ford sold his first Quadricycle for $200 in 1896 He later built two more: one in 1899, and another in This machine maxxed out at 20 mph and had a whopping 4 hp Seen as a toy for the rich  Over 90% of American families made less than $750/year, & the majority of them earned less than $500/year Retrieved from Wikipedia and Herndon, Ford: An Unconventional Biography of the Men and Their Times, (New York: Weybright & Talley, 1969), p. 62; also Flammang et al., Ford Chronicle, (Publications International, 1992), p.9 (as cited in Brinkley, David, Wheels for the World: Henry Ford, His Company, and a Century of Progress, (New York: Penguin Group, 2003), p.23 &strucID=547003&imageID= &word=Wages&s=3¬word&d &c&f=2&k=0&lWord&lField&sScope&sLevel&sLabel&total=3&num=0 &imgs=20&pNum&pos=3

32 Still a toy for the rich … 2013 BUGATTI VEYRON 16.4 GRAND SPORT VITESSE Image: fanpop.com Info: motortrend.com

33 Human Horsepower A healthy human can produce about…  1.2 hp briefly  and sustain about 0.1 hp indefinitely Trained athletes can manage up to about …  2.5 hp briefly  and 0.3 hp for a period of several hours. Retrieved from Eugene A. Avallone et. al, (ed), Marks' Standard Handbook for Mechanical Engineers 11th Edition, Mc-Graw Hill, New York 2007ISBN page 9-4ISBN

34 James Watt + Thomas Edison = 1760 – 1820s: NYC lit by oil lamps Gas street lighting replaced oil lamps in the 1820s, starting at Broadway and Grand Street. 1880: the first electric street lights arrived along Broadway between 14th and 26th Streets—as seen below in this sketch from the April 1881 cover of Scientific American.April 1881 cover of Retrieved from 2/09/17/the-first-electric-street-lights-to- illuminate-the-city/

35 James Watt By the early 1900s, this was a bird's eye view of NYC: Retrieved from alnewyork.word press.com/2012 /09/17/the- first-electric- street-lights-to- illuminate-the- city/

36 And here’s Times Square (early 1900s)… Retrieved from

37 And yet despite all this… Retrieved from Number of people living without electricity RegionMillions without electricity South Asia706 Sub-Saharan Africa547 East Asia224 Other billion people — a quarter of humanity — live without electricity… Breaking that down further:

38 So, later in this unit… You will complete a project in which you will explore the pros & cons of your choice of alternative energy sources (non – fossil fuels). One of the areas you will research will involve the feasibility of the energy source to be implemented worldwide.

39 Check in when done; if you can correctly defend your responses, you will be declared an “expert” Mrs. Correia or a student expert can declare other students “experts.” Within 5 minutes, all students should be “experts.”

40 Exit Slip See the BACK of your Do Now for your Exit Slip Use COMPLETE THOUGHTS Turn in when done Don’t forget to do your HW tonight  Read & Study 8.2; Complete #5 and (p. 119 – 120)


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