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Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District K-6 Math Program Evaluation February 2009.

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Presentation on theme: "Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District K-6 Math Program Evaluation February 2009."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District K-6 Math Program Evaluation February 2009

2 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Co-Chairs of the Committee Suzanne Cadwalader, 5-8 Supervisor of Math and Science Frank Chiaravalli, Supervising Chairperson of Math 9-12 Cheryl Dyer, Assistant Superintendent Barbara Kane, K-4 Supervisor of Math and Science

3 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Description of the Process In September 2008, the Superintendent directed the Assistant Superintendent to form a committee to be co- chaired by the math supervisors, to evaluate the existing math program and consider alternative programs as per the recommendation from the Everyday Math Committee of The Assistant Superintendent convened the math supervisors and the four administrators assumed the role of a Steering Committee. The Steering Committee invited teachers throughout the district to apply to be part of the evaluation committee. Ultimately, 35 teachers were selected for the evaluation committee.

4 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The Process Continued 35 teachers represented all grade levels (K-12) and all buildings Teachers were divided into study groups and a research sub-committee Each teacher received a binder with background information, a copy of the EDM report, and a copy of the NMAP report The Steering Committee selected nine programs for consideration

5 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Understanding the Task The full committee met for the first time on November 3 rd. The Steering Committee provided the Evaluation Committee with background information and an overview of the contents of the binder The Evaluation Committee was divided into study teams and a research team

6 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The Task To analyze the research on best practices for teaching mathematics at the elementary and intermediate level To evaluate 9 different sets of resources for teaching mathematics against a predetermined set of criteria To rank order the 9 sets of resources from best to worst To recommend the best math ‘program’ to the Superintendent of Schools

7 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Schedule of Meetings Steering Committee  September 25, October 30, November 13, December 11 Research Committee  November 18 and November 25 in addition to full committee dates Full Committee  November 3, December 1, December 11, January 15, January 23 Principal Input  January 8: K-6 Principal Review and input

8 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Background Information Student Achievement Data Findings of the EDM Committee Perceptions of the Current Program Parents Teachers Understanding the ‘Traditional’ vs. ‘Reform’ debate Review of Relevant Research Recommendations from the National Math Advisory Panel

9 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Perceptions of the Program Parents K-4 (598 respondents) 61% felt that their children were adequately challenged in math 31% said that they were ‘dissatisfied’ or ‘very dissatisfied’ with the math program 5-6 (122 respondents) 67% felt that their children were adequately challenged in math 47% said that they were ‘dissatisfied’ or ‘very dissatisfied’ with the math program

10 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Perceptions of the Program Teachers 77% felt that the current math program supported their efforts to differentiate 81% felt that the current math program provides ample opportunity for students to think critically and develop problem solving skills 77% felt that the current math program provides ample opportunities to develop conceptual understanding

11 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Perceptions of the Program Teachers 52% felt that the current math program provides sufficient opportunities to develop computational fluency and skill 72% felt that the current math program prepares students for success at the next grade 85% recognized that the district has had to add to the EDM program and that the BRRSD curriculum was not ‘pure’ EDM

12 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District In your professional opinion, what are the advantages of the EDM curriculum materials? Hands-on nature of materials Ability to differentiate Student engagement with materials User-friendly nature of teacher’s manual and student journals Emphasis on critical thinking and conceptual understanding Real-life applications Attention to different learning styles Spiraling nature of curriculum

13 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District In your professional opinion, what are the limitations of the EDM curriculum materials? Lack of focus/lack of expectation for mastery Inability to meet the needs of struggling learners Lack of sufficient time to ‘cover’ the curriculum Lack of sufficient practice problems Emphasis on critical thinking and conceptual understanding Insufficient focus on fundamentals or basic facts Too many strategies Insufficient problem solving lessons Spiraling nature of curriculum

14 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Perceptions of the Program Middle School and High School Middle and high school teachers report that their average to below average students have difficulty with whole numbers, fractions and problem-solving. The number of students who are ‘algebra ready’ by 7 th grade has not changed. More students are ‘algebra ready’ by 8 th grade More students advance to higher level math classes in high school

15 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Understanding the Debate Traditional Pedagogy Teacher Centered Explicit Instruction Content Oriented Reform Pedagogy Student Centered Discovery Learning Process Oriented Strategic use of both is the key to success!

16 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The ‘traditional’ view of ‘reform’ curricula:

17 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The ‘reform’ view of ‘traditional’ curricula:

18 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Professor Wilson from Johns Hopkins: “The reality is, if, like in high performing countries, we could cut down the content to what mathematicians and engineers think is important, there would be lots of time to play around with concepts in a constructivist way before you nailed down the math. I care about nailing down the math, but most constructivists disagree about what the math is, so they don't do what I want.”

19 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Professor Milgram from Stanford: “The math wars, at least on the part of the professional mathematics community and the business community were not about minor issues like whether constructivist pedagogy or direct instruction should be used in delivering mathematics, but the major issue that our student outcomes are too weak to be competitive with the rest of the world. It should be clearly understood that I don’t mean just our average students, but even our very best are not competitive any longer. While the rest of the world has learned a great deal about how to teach mathematics to young children, we are essentially recycling old ideas every years, and have been doing so for a very long time.”

20 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Review of the Research National Math Advisory Panel Reviewed over 16,000 research studies Some research shows that NCTM programs are effective; some research shows that these programs are not as effective as more traditional programs (Ginsburg et al., 2005; Hyde, 2007; Jayanthi et al., 2008; Leinwand & Ginsburg, 2007; Lewis, 2005; National Mathematics Advisory Panel, 2008).

21 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Review of the Research Learning Theory Children learn in a variety of different ways and that some concepts should be taught through orchestrated and teacher-directed discovery and others should be explicitly taught (Chall, 2000; Ginsburg, Leinwand, Anstrom, & Pollock, 2005; Hyde, 2007; Jayanthi, Gersten, & Baker, 2008; Tyre, 2008). While contextual learning is necessary and appropriate, understanding of underlying math concepts does not necessarily follow automatically (Hyde, 2007; Jayanthi et al., 2008; Loewenberg Ball et al., 2005)

22 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The National Math Panel Report Recommendation # 1 The curriculum for grades K-8 should be streamlined. It should follow a coherent progression with emphasis on mastery of key topics, there should be a focus on the critical foundations for algebra, and any approach that continually revisits topics without closure should be avoided.

23 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The National Math Panel Report Recommendation # 2 Proficiency with whole numbers, fractions, and certain aspects of geometry and measurement are the foundations for algebra. Of these, knowledge of fractions is the most important foundational skill not developed among American students.

24 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The National Math Panel Report Recommendation # 3 Conceptual understanding, computational and procedural fluency, and problem solving skills are equally important and mutually reinforce each other. Debates regarding the relative importance of each of these components of mathematics are misguided.

25 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The National Math Panel Report Recommendation # 4 Students should develop immediate recall of arithmetic facts to free the “working memory” for solving more complex problems.

26 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The National Math Panel Report Recommendation # 5 Explicit instruction for students who struggle with math is effective in increasing student learning. Teachers should understand how to provide clear models for solving a problem type using an array of examples, offer opportunities for extensive practice, encourage students to “think aloud,” and give specific feedback.

27 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The National Math Panel Report Recommendation # 6 Teachers’ mathematical knowledge is important for students’ achievement. The preparation of elementary and middle school teachers in mathematics should be strengthened. Teachers cannot be expected to teach what they do not know.

28 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The National Math Panel Report Recommendation # 7 The belief that children of particular ages cannot learn certain content because they are “too young” or “not ready” has consistently been shown to be false.

29 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The National Math Panel Report Recommendation # 8 Student effort is important. Much of the public’s “resignation” about mathematics education is based on the erroneous idea that success comes from inherent talent or ability in mathematics, not effort. A focus on the importance of effort in mathematics learning will improve outcomes.

30 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The National Math Panel Report Recommendation # 9 Mathematically gifted students should be allowed to accelerate their learning.

31 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Programs Reviewed enVision Math (Pearson/Scott Foresman) Everyday Math (McGraw Hill/Wright Group) HSP Math (Harcourt School Publishers) Math Connects (McMillan/McGraw Hill) Math Expressions (Houghton Mifflin) Progress in Mathematics (Sadlier-Oxford)

32 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Programs Reviewed Saxon Math (Saxon) Singapore Math (Singapore) Think Math (Harcourt School Publishers) Glencoe (5 th and 6 th grade)

33 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The Rubric: 6 Levels 18 Indicators Total Level Six~ Most Important: Content is comprehensive and accurate at each grade level

34 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Level Five Builds conceptual understandings & computational fluency through vertical articulation Defines core content and essential concepts / understandings clearly Aligns content with state and national standards Develops concepts using multiple representations in order to formulate generalizations Requires use of mathematical language, vocabulary, and notation Promotes critical thinking, problem-solving, and reasoning

35 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Level Four Uses materials that meet grade level expectations for students. Uses multiple forms of assessment and embeds continuous assessment in student learning Includes a variety of questioning techniques (fact and recall, open-ended, probing and clarifying, application, transfer) beyond recitation

36 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Level Three Engages all students in active learning through worthwhile tasks in which they construct mathematical understandings Makes meaningful connections within mathematics, to other content areas, and to real-life situations Supports teachers’ efforts to differentiate for whole group instruction, small group collaboration and individualized instruction as needed.

37 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Level Two Reflects the use of technology, real-life applications, and careers Supports the teachers efforts to differentiate through varied methods of instruction, learning styles and cultures

38 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Level One Provides both intervention, enrichment activities and additional resources to extend student learning Provides multiple opportunities to apply and practice skills and concepts in order to promote fluency and understanding. Implementation of curriculum materials: level of PD, implement K-6 at one time; online parent resources

39 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Ranking of Programs After review by the study groups, the programs were rank ordered based on the score earned on the rubric. The 'top' programs were invited to send a representative to meet with the committee and answer questions and present their program.

40 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Top Programs The following publishers were invited to meet with the committee:  enVision  Everyday Math  HSP Math  Math Connects  Math Expressions

41 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Second Round of Review Following the presentations, the committee agreed to eliminate the following programs from consideration: enVision Everyday Math Math Expressions

42 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Second Round of Review The full committee used the rubric to evaluate the two top programs by grade level Harcourt School Publishers (HSP) Math Math Connects

43 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District The Results GradeHSP MathMath Connects K Total

44 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District It’s Unanimous! The committee determined that HSP Math is the best choice for BRRSD because: It is aligned with the recommendations of the National Math Advisory Panel It provides for coherent and comprehensive instruction using traditional algorithms and conceptual understanding It includes sufficient materials (concrete and virtual) for practice that leads to mastery. It provides for intervention and enrichment in accordance with our RTI model

45 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Between Now and September: The Superintendent recommends the adoption to the BOE The BOE approves the adoption The community supports the budget The materials are purchased (K-6) Professional Development occurs

46 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Additional Data

47 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Student Achievement Data Elementary Most of the districts in our comparison group with 3 rd and 4 th grade NJ ASK results that are better than BRRSD use a math program other than Everyday Math Secondary Seven of the ten districts in our comparison group have SAT mean scores in math higher than BRRSD (pre-EDM students) PSAT Results for students who are pre-EDM are not significantly different from results from EDM students

48 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District School2006 3M2007 3M2008 3M2006 4M2007 4M2008 4MMath Program BRRSD Everyday Math DFG Bernards Everyday Math Hillsborough Everyday Math Montgomery Everyday Math Warren Harcourt Math Watchung Houghton-Mifflin Princeton Everyday Math West-Windsor TERC Investigations Flemington- Raritan Everyday Math South Brunswick Math Investigations Holmdel Houghton-Mifflin Long Hill Chatham Harcourt Math Percent of Students ‘partially proficient’ by Grade Level

49 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Special Education Results BRRSD DFGBernardsChathamWarren BRRSD DFGBernardsChathamWarren 3 rd Grade th Grade th Grade th Grade th Grade th Grade

50 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District Secondary Data SAT Comparison DataRankSAT Math BRRHS8568 Ridge7594 Hillsborough Holmdel3607 Hunterdon Central9553 Montgomery Princeton Regional1619 South Brunswick West Windsor Plainsboro South2618 West Windsor Plainsboro North4599 Watchung Hills5-6596

51 Bridgewater-Raritan Regional School District PSAT Results


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