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Chapter 22 America as a World Power 1867 - 1920. Essential Question How did America’s growing power affect its relationships with other nations?

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 22 America as a World Power 1867 - 1920. Essential Question How did America’s growing power affect its relationships with other nations?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 22 America as a World Power

2 Essential Question How did America’s growing power affect its relationships with other nations?

3 I. The United States Gains Overseas Territories Imperialism: building an empire by founding colonies or conquering other nations (Europe) Isolationism: avoiding involvement in the affairs of other countries (U.S.) By late 1800’s, U.S. needed to expand to keep economy strong – Capt. Alfred Mahan publishes The Influence of Sea Power upon History: argued for a strong navy to protect economic interests and naval bases around the world

4 Pacific Expansion Areas acquired by the U.S. – Alaska (Seward’s Folly) – fur, timber, minerals – Midway Islands – naval base – Samoa – naval base – Hawaii – sugar, naval base Areas opened/controlled by the U.S. – Japan – trade opened with U.S. in 1853 – begins a 40-year modernization toward Japan becoming an imperial power – China – spheres of influence: areas where foreign nations controlled resources Open Door Policy: all nations should have equal access to trade Boxer Rebellion: Chinese nationalists angered by foreign influence, killed foreign born people – U.S. and Europe invade

5 II. The Spanish-American War Yellow Journalism: sensational, often exaggerated news stories – Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst – Vivid stories of Spanish brutality toward Cuba – De Lôme Letter – Spanish minister to U.S. called President McKinley “weak” – U.S.S. Maine – battleship blown up in Havana Harbor on February 15, 1898 – Spain blamed “Remember the Maine!”

6 War in the Philippines Filipinos, like the Cubans, were revolting against Spain May 1, 1898, Commodore George Dewey destroys entire Spanish Pacific fleet – no American killed U.S. troops and Filipino rebels take over led by Emilio Aquinaldo

7 War in the Caribbean U.S. Army not prepared – Not enough rifles or bullets – Wool uniforms – Ate canned meat from Civil War – Yellow fever – more soldiers died of disease than battle wounds Rough Riders – Led by Theodore Roosevelt – Captured San Juan Hill and Kettle Hill overlooking Santiago

8 United States Gains Territories Spain signs cease fire on August 12, 1898 Philippines – Wanted freedom, but became a territory of U.S. until 1946 – Filipinos fight guerrilla war with U.S. up through 1902 – 4200 American soldiers killed Puerto Rico – Wanted freedom, but became a territory of U.S. Cuba – Teller Amendment (1898): United States would not annex Cuba – Platt Amendment (1899): allowed the U.S. to intervene in Cuban affairs – lasted until 1959

9 III. The United States and Latin America Panama Canal: – Connects Atlantic and Pacific oceans – U.S. supported Panama’s independence from Colombia – Construction began in 1904 – took 10 years to build

10 U.S. Policy Toward Latin America “Speak softly and carry a big stick” Theodore Roosevelt believed U.S. should play active role in Western Hemisphere – Monroe Doctrine (1823): warned Europe to stay out of Latin American affairs – Roosevelt Corollary (1904): U.S. can intervene in Latin American affairs

11 U.S. Interests in Latin America Dollar Diplomacy: policy of President Taft – influencing governments through economic intervention Moral Diplomacy: policy of President Wilson – promote democracy in Latin America, but use force if necessary – Mexican Revolution: struggle for power U.S. invades Mexico to prevent weapons arriving from Europe and to capture rebel leader Pancho Villa


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