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Online Bullying WW Among Children 8-17. 2 Defining Online Bullying Q4. Primary definition of cyberbullying used in this study Q4. Ask About Experiences.

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Presentation on theme: "Online Bullying WW Among Children 8-17. 2 Defining Online Bullying Q4. Primary definition of cyberbullying used in this study Q4. Ask About Experiences."— Presentation transcript:

1 Online Bullying WW Among Children 8-17

2 2 Defining Online Bullying Q4. Primary definition of cyberbullying used in this study Q4. Ask About Experiences You have been unfriendly or mean toward other children on the Internet or offline You have made fun or teased other children on the Internet or offline You have called other children mean names on the Internet or offline Other children have been unfriendly or mean toward you on the Internet or offline Other children have made fun of you or teased you on the Internet or offline Other children have called you mean names on the Internet or offline Microsoft recently commissioned a study to understand the global pervasiveness of online bullying. While defined formally by some as cyberbullying, what is seen as cyberbullying can vary between different cultures, and even among different individuals. In addition, cyberbullying, as a term, is not recognized worldwide. To address this, the study explored the issue by asking children about negative experiences they’ve had online—from their point of view (i.e., being called mean names, being teased, etc.). While such experiences may not be viewed as bullying by all who experience it, these behaviors may be considered by some as having potentially adverse effects.

3 3 Purpose: Conduct a survey to investigate the prevalence of online bullying worldwide. Audience: 8-17 year old children balanced by gender. Adults were allowed to help their children answer questions if necessary. Sample Size: N=7644, Quota~300 per country/region Methodology: 5 minute online survey. 7 countries/regions required the interviews to be conducted in person (in italics below). Fieldwork and data processing performed by Synovate. Geography: 25 countries/regions - Australia, Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Morocco, Norway, Pakistan, Poland, Qatar, Russia, Singapore, Spain, Turkey, UAE, UK, US Timing: January 11, 2012 to Feb 19, 2012 Background & Methodology

4 4 Online bullying affects nearly one in four children aged 8-17 Thirty-seven percent report being bullied online. Online bullying can take the form of children being mean or unfriendly, calling others mean names and making fun of or teasing others. While not all may consider this to be online bullying, it can have adverse effects. Twenty-four percent admit to bullying someone else online Spending more than 10 hours per week online increases the chances a child becomes a victim of bullying (46% vs. 29%) and bullies others online (30% vs. 19%) Bullying is pervasive and contagious Eighty-Six percent of children surveyed say they have been bullied online and/or offline Those surveyed report offline bullying is nearly twice as common as online bullying (72% vs. 37%) Bullying has a widespread negative influence within children’s social circles. Children are more likely to: Bully someone else online if they have friends that do (45% vs. 24%) Be bullied if they were a witness to someone else being bullied online (64% vs. 37%) Be bullied if they bully someone else online. (63% vs. 37%) Bully others online if they bully others offline (31% vs. 24%) Executive Summary

5 5 Knowledge about bullying is surprisingly low Forty-two percent report knowing little or nothing about online bullying Among those who’ve been bullied online, 34% reported they know little or nothing about online bullying Fifty-four percent of those surveyed say they are very or somewhat worried about online bullying. The level of concern rises to 65% for children who’ve been bullied online. Parents need help to figure out the best steps to take On average, children surveyed report their parents take three steps to address online bullying. No particular step stood out (i.e. >50%) which suggests a lack of consensus about what are the most effective ways to protect children online. The most common steps taken are: talking to their children about the risks of being online (50%), monitoring their online usage (44%) and teaching them online manners (39%). Less than one-third of children surveyed report their parents take steps that focus on how to manage and cope with online bullying. Teach their children how to help protect themselves from being bullied online (29%) Teach their children not bully others online (28%) Discussed how to deal with online bullying with their children (26%) The more steps taken, the higher the incidence of online bullying. Other research shows that parents typically take steps AFTER an online bullying experience not before which helps explain why steps taken increases with higher levels of online bullying. Executive Summary

6 6 Formal school policies and education do not appear to reduce bullying According to children surveyed the online bullying rate for schools with formal policies is higher than schools with none (44% vs. 32%). The same is true for schools that provide education to parents, teachers or students (43% vs. 32%). Overall, schools without policies or education have a rate of bullying that is five points lower than the worldwide average of 37%. This result may also be due to schools implementing policies as a reaction to an existing problem. Schools may only implement formal policies and educational programs AFTER online bullying has reached a critical level. Online bullying is more prevalent among year olds Children surveyed are more likely to: Be bullied online (43% vs. 31%) Bully someone else online (29% vs. 18%) Be knowledgeable about online bullying (69% vs. 46%) Be concerned about online bullying (56% vs. 52%). Children 8-12 surveyed are more likely to be bullied offline (76% vs. 68%). Children report their parents emphasize different steps to protect them depending their age Monitoring their children (51% vs. 36%) and setting time limits (41% vs. 28%) are more common among 8-12 year olds Children report parents are more likely to use these methods with teens: using software to block risky and unsafe websites (14% vs. 0%), asking their children if they’ve been bullied (33% vs. 27%), and discussing with them how to deal with bullying (28% vs. 24%). Executive Summary

7 7 Bullying is higher for girls Girls report being more likely to: Be bullied online (38% vs. 36%) and offline (74% vs. 70%) Be concerned about online bullying (57% vs. 50%) Have a friend who was bullied online (34% vs. 32%) Have a friend who bullied someone else online (15% vs. 12%) Girls report receiving different amounts and types of help from parents. Girls report being more likely to: Get help (more steps taken by their parents) 3.4 vs. 3.2 Be told about the risks (52% vs. 47%) Be taught how to protect themselves (31% vs. 26%) Be asked if they have been bullied (32% vs. 29%) Be monitored more frequently (45% vs. 42%) The difference in how girls and boys bully may explain why girls are more vulnerable to online bullying. Compared to boys, girls are more likely to use indirect forms of bullying: ostracizing and alienating other kids, gossiping and spreading rumors and purposely excluding peers. These types of bullying are tailor- made for the Internet. Boys surveyed were more likely to admit they bullied someone else online or offline Online (26 vs. 22%); Offline (46% vs. 38%) Executive Summary

8 8 Geographic Differences Incidence of bullying In general, online bullying appears to flourish in countries/regions where GDP growth is high, Internet growth has been rapid and online social norms are still forming Highest online bullying countries/regions: China (70%), India (53%), Argentina (52%), Russia (49%), Turkey (47%) UAE (7%) and Qatar (28%) are exceptions to this pattern Online bullying is less prevalent in Japan (17%), France (23%), Italy (28%), US (29%), Norway (35%) UAE (7%), Pakistan (26%), Egypt (27%), Qatar (28%), Malaysia (33%) Offline bullying is highest in Morocco (50%), Canada (36%), UK (31%), US (27%), Australia (24%) Knowledge & concern about bullying Knowledge about online bullying is not correlated with the incidence of online bullying Children in Morocco (38%), Pakistan (31%) and India (29%) report knowing the most about online bullying. Children in Turkey (36%)., Japan (33%) and Malaysia, (33%) say they are the least knowledgeable about online bullying. Children in Brazil (51%), Spain (40%), India (36%), China (27%), Argentina (26%) express the highest amount of concern about online bullying Executive Summary

9 9 Geographic Differences School policy & education The highest prevalence of school policies dealing with online bullying were reported in Qatar (40%), Australia (38%), US (36%), and Canada (35%) Turkey (0%), UAE (0%), Pakistan (2%), Russia (3%), and Malaysia (3%) were reported least likely to have a formal written school policy Providing education to students about online bullying was reported highest in Australia (64%), Canada (58%), Singapore (58%), UK (53%), and US (45%) Turkey (2%), Pakistan (6%), Egypt (8%), and UAE (8%) were reported least likely to provide online bullying education to students. The lowest incidence of online bullying was reported in Japan (17%), France (23%), Italy (28%), US (29%), Norway (35%), UAE (7%), Pakistan (26%), Egypt (27%), Qatar (28%), Malaysia (33% Offline bullying was reported highest in Morocco (50%), Canada (36%), UK (31%), US (27%), Australia (24%) Executive Summary

10 10 What is online bullying? Online bullying (also known as cyberbullying) extends bullying to the Internet and text messaging with repeated behavior that is intended to tease, demean, or harass someone less powerful. It opens the door to 24-hour hurt, perhaps made anonymously and potentially broadcast to a wide audience. Kids who bully may: Send hurtful or threatening messages to a target’s phone or in an online game, or distribute humiliating video on social media like Facebook, Tumblr, or YouTube. Disclose secrets or private info—for example, by forwarding a confidential instant or text message. Deliberately exclude someone from a group—in a game or virtual world, or on social media. Impersonate the target. Break into someone’s phone or social media account, and then send or post hateful comments or cause trouble with friends. Pretend to befriend someone, gain his or her trust, and then betray that trust. There are many reasons why young people mistreat others online—out of boredom, to get approval or be funny, to retaliate for having been bullied themselves, or because they are in distress. It isn’t always intentional—what starts as an argument may escalate. Often, kids may not even recognize their behavior as bullying, rather referring to it as drama.* * The Drama! Teen Conflict, Gossip, and Bullying in Networked Publics (aka.ms/teen_drama)aka.ms/teen_drama What is Online B ullying?

11 11 Pay attention. Regularly sit with young kids as they play online. From time to time, ask tweens & teens to show you around. Listen to them and ask them to share. Lead by example, watch for signs of online cruelty, and ask them to report bullying to you. Encourage empathy: Asking kids to put themselves in others’ shoes (those of bullies, too) is a powerful way to help combat online bullying. Bystanders. To help kids support each other, encourage them to become “Upstanders:” be kind; set a good example; block bullying behavior; tell the bully to stop, and tell others. And don’t forget your role as backup support. Targets. If a child is the target of online bullying, don’t wait to see if the abuse will stop. Get the full story, acknowledge the pain, and ask what you can do to help, and then make the kid’s answers the basis of the plan. Bullying. If you discover that a kid is bullying someone, try to understand the source of the behavior. (But don’t let reasons become excuses.) Be supportive. Discuss making amends. If necessary, get professional help. Promote kindness as a way to change the environment in which kids learn to bully one another. Help Stop the Cycle of O nline B ullying

12 12 Microsoft’s Online Safety Resources Download Microsoft’s online bullying materials: brochure | factsheetbrochure factsheet Help Kids Stand Up to Online Bullying:

13 13 Detailed Findings

14 14 Defining Online Bullying Q4. Primary definition of cyberbullying used in this study Q4. Ask About Experiences You have been unfriendly or mean toward other children on the Internet or offline You have made fun or teased other children on the Internet or offline You have called other children mean names on the Internet or offline Other children have been unfriendly or mean toward you on the Internet or offline Other children have made fun of you or teased you on the Internet or offline Other children have called you mean names on the Internet or offline Microsoft recently commissioned a study to understand the global pervasiveness of online bullying. While defined formally by some as cyberbullying, what is seen as cyberbullying can vary between different cultures, and even among different individuals. In addition, cyberbullying, as a term, is not recognized worldwide. To address this, the study explored the issue by asking children about negative experiences they’ve had online—from their point of view (i.e., being called mean names, being teased, etc.). While such experiences may not be viewed as bullying by all who experience it, these behaviors may be considered by some as having potentially adverse effects. 1.Question 4: Children were asked about the experiences they’ve had online—from their point of view (being called mean names, or being teased, etc.)

15 15 37% of Children 8-17 Report Being Bullied Online Children % Bullied Online or Offline 72% Bullied Offline 37% Bullied Online 23% Bullied Online & Offline

16 16 Q4. Which of these has ever happened to you at school, outside of school grounds, or on the Internet? A diverse group of country/regions (including 3 of the BRIC) led by China (70%) report the highest rates of online bullying along with Singapore (58%), India (53%), Argentina (52%), Russia (49%), and Turkey (47%). Q4. Online Bullying Definition Other children have been unfriendly or mean toward you on the Internet Other children have made fun of you or teased you on the Internet Other children have called you mean names on the Internet China Reports the Highest Level of Online Bullying

17 17 24% of Children 8-17 Admit to Bullying Someone Else Online Children % Bullied Someone Else Online or Offline 42% Bullied Someone Else Offline 24% Bullied Someone Else Online 13% Bullied Someone Else Online & Offline

18 18 Online Bullying of Others is Reportedly Highest in China, Lowest in UAE & Japan Q4. Online Bullying of Others Definition You have been unfriendly or mean toward you on the Internet You made fun of you or teased you on the Internet You have called you mean names on the Internet

19 19 Bullying is Pervasive Q4. Which of these has ever happened to you at school, outside of school grounds, or on the Internet? Eighty-six percent have been bullied either offline, online or both. Offline bullying (72%) is typically twice as prevalent as online bullying (37%). Six countries/regions have high offline and online bullying (China, Singapore, India, Argentina, Russia, and Turkey). China and Singapore are the only countries/regions where online bullying is higher than offline bullying. High Online & Offline Bullying

20 20 Q4. Which of these has ever happened to you at school, outside of school grounds, or on the Internet? WW 37% Bullied Online Other children have been unfriendly or mean toward you on the Internet 19% Other children have made fun of you or teased you on the Internet 20% Other children have called you mean names on the Internet 18% 24% Bullied Someone Else Online You have been unfriendly or mean toward you on the Internet 8% You have made fun of you or teased you on the Internet 14% You have called you mean names on the Internet 12% 72% Bullied Offline Other children have been unfriendly or mean toward you at school or on the playground 42% Other children have made fun of you or teased you at school or on the playground 41% Other children have called you mean names at school or on the playground 35% 42% Bullied Someone Else Offline You have been unfriendly or mean toward you at school or on the playground 18% You have made fun of you or teased you at school or on the playground 23% You have called you mean names at school or on the playground 20% Types of Online & Offline Bullying Offline bullying is nearly twice as common as bullying online. Reported rates of bullying someone else are significantly lower than the reported rates of being bullied. This suggests bullies target multiple children and/or some children were unwilling to admit to bullying someone else.

21 21 Types of Online & Offline Bullying: Country/Region Detail Types of Online & Offline Bullying WW USCAAUINJPMYSGCZPLRUCNARBREGMAPKQATRAEFRDEITNOESUK Bullied Online Other children have been unfriendly or mean toward you on the Internet 19%-2%10%6%3%-12%-8%11%-4%12%8%9%12%-9%-4%14%-12%-9%2%-15%-9%7%-4%3%-2%4% Other children have made fun of you or teased you on the Internet 20%-5%5%-4%9%-10%0%16%5%-3%0%18%7%5%-9%15%-7%-9%6%-17%-4%-2%-10%-1%-7%0% Other children have called you mean names on the Internet 18%-4%4%1%7%-12%-2%12%-4%-1%6%30%10%-4%-14%10%-10%-6%-2%-17%-12%2%-8%-2%1%4% Online Bully You have been unfriendly or mean toward you on the Internet 8%-2%3%-2%7%-7%-3%9%-2%-1%2%4%2%-6% 12%-3%-2%11%-6%-4%-1% 0%-3%-2% You have made fun of you or teased you on the Internet 14%-8%-2%-8%16%-9%-5%19%1%-9%9%22%10%2%-11%3%-8%5%3%-13%1%-5%-8%-7%-1%-5% You have called you mean names on the Internet 12%-6%-1%-5%13%-7%-5%8%-7%-3%-1%29%2%-6%-8%6%17%5%-3%-9%2%-5%-6%-4% -5% Bullied Offline Other children have been unfriendly or mean toward you at school or on the playground 42%23%26%24%-21%-9%-18%-13%-4%14%2%-17%8%-9%-5%25%-26%-7% -26%-3%16%-5%8%2%18% Other children have made fun of you or teased you at school or on the playground 41%7%16%13%-8%5%2%-10%5%3%-7%-14%3%-3%-25%26%-15%-4%-9%0%6%4%-17%2%3%17% Other children have called you mean names at school or on the playground 35%3%15% -9%-13%4%-11%-10%10%3%5%3%2%-19%39%-10%-20%-3%0%-8%4%-11%-1% 11% Offline Bully You have been unfriendly or mean toward you at school or on the playground 18%0%2%-6%-3%-8%-1%-2%-5%10%1%-6%1%-11%-4%25%-5% 14%9%-1%4%-4%0%-4%-6% You have made fun of you or teased you at school or on the playground 23%-11%-3%-9%6%4% 5%3%-5%7%2%9%-1%-11%13%-11%8%4%-8%15%7%-12%-7%10%-6% You have called you mean names at school or on the playground 20%-7%-2%-6%6%-2%0%-3%-14%7%8%9%3%-5%-8%17%-10%-12%9%3%19%-6%-7%-5%-1%-5% Difference from the WW Average Red = Above Average White = Average Blue = Below Average

22 22 Bullying is Contagious If my friends are online bullies, I’m more likely to be one too Online bullies Are more likely to be victims of bullying Children who’ve been bullied are More likely to bully others

23 23 Bullying Someone Else Online & Offline Q4. Which of these has ever happened to you at school, outside of school grounds, or on the Internet? Countries/regions with high bullying, also report high bullying of others – esp. China, India, Singapore, Argentina and Turkey. China, Singapore and Pakistan are the only countries/regions where bullying someone else online is higher than bullying someone else offline. The anonymous nature of the Internet makes bullying easier and subject to less self-policing from peers. As a result, children in these countries/regions may have shifted a disproportionate amount of their bullying online. Q4. Online Bullying of Others Definition You have been unfriendly or mean toward you on the Internet You have made fun of you or teased you on the Internet You have called you mean names on the Internet Online > Offline

24 24 42% Know Little to Nothing About Online Bullying Q5. How much do you know about online bullying? Knowledge of online bullying tells us little about the incidence of online bullying. Children in Morocco (38%), Pakistan (31%) and India (29%) report knowing the most about online bullying. India is ranked relatively high, Morocco in the middle and Pakistan low on being bullied online. Children in Turkey (36%)., Japan (33%) and Malaysia, (33%) say they are the least knowledgeable about online bullying. Turkey is ranked in the top 10 for harassment/harassment of others, while Japan and Malaysia are ranked in the bottom 10.

25 25 54% Are Worried About Online Bullying Q6. How worried are you about online bullying? Children in Brazil, Spain and India are most worried about online bullying.

26 26 Children Surveyed Report Parents Take 3 Steps to Address Online Bullying Other research suggests that most parents take steps to prevent bullying AFTER a negative experience. No single step is taken by more than half of parents. Only 17% have talked to their children about clear rules and consequences for online-harassment behavior. Very few parents (5%) engage with their children’s school about online bullying. Q8. What have your parents done or talked to you about online bullying? WW Talked to me about the risks of being online 50% Monitored my online usage 44% Taught me online manners 39% Limited the amount of time I can be online 34% Asked me if I have ever been bullied online 30% Taught me how to help protect myself from being bullied online 29% Taught me how to not bully someone else online 28% Discussed with me how to deal with online bullying 26% Asked me if I have ever bullied someone else online 19% Communicated clear rules and punishment for online bullying-type behavior 17% Used parental control software to block risky or unsafe web sites 7% Asked my school to look out for others who might be bullying me online 5% Asked my school to look out for me bullying others online 4% Done something else about online bullying 1% Not talked to me or told me anything about online bullying 14%

27 27 Steps Parents Take: Country/Region Detail Q8. What have your parents done or talked to you about online bullying? WWUSCAAUINJPMYSGCZPLRUCNARBREGMAPKQATRAEFRDEITNOESUK Talked to me about the risks of being online 50% 8%17%20%0%-21%-17%-1%10%8%-4%9%5%4%-7%-4%-28%-17%-18%-17%0%13%-5%28%11%12% Monitored my online usage 44% 6%13%9%7%-13%-14%0%-3%2%6%8%-4%3%-7%7%-16%-17%-15%-8%-1%7%-4%27%1%5% Taught me online manners 39% 7%11%14%11%-15%-19%9%-7%0%-2%22%8%12%-17%5%-25%-9%-20%-15%4%8%-2%-3%2%8% Limited the amount of time I can be online 34% 9%12%10%4%-14%-19%4%-13%18%22%10%-4%23%-19%12%-22%-21%-23%-16%8%-7%-3%31%-1%0% Asked me if I have ever been bullied online 30% 18%19%15%-11%-6%-23%-9%0%5% -2%15%4%-38%2%-38%-11%-29%-23%18% 11%16%21%10% Taught me how to help protect myself from being bullied online 29% 22%18%10%-5%-29%-14%-3%-13%1%8%-6%13%6%-16%17%-21%4%-23%-4%10%2%-6%-8%23%7% Taught me how to not bully someone else online 28% 7%10%0%-5%-13%4%-1%-12%-6%17% 2%-5%-18%31%-20%17%-9%-8%-3%9%-13%0%10%0% Discussed with me how to deal with online bullying 26% 4%2%4%2%-3%-2%1%-4%-1%1%6%0%-4%-7%13%-1%-6%-5%-3%3%1%-2% -1%3% Asked me if I have ever bullied someone else online 19% 8%10%-2%6%-1%-21%0%-11%10% 11%14%17%-32%9%-27%-13%-35%-27%12%23%10% 20%-5% Communicated clear rules and punishment for online bullying-type behavior 17% 9%15%16%4%-14%-17%0%4%1%-5%14%-5%13%-23%3%-18%-13%-15%-9%8%13%-3%4%5%9% Not talked to me or told me anything about online bullying 14% 19%13%2%-14%-15%2%1%9%-7%5%4%15%-15%6%-11%-12%-15%-10%1%-2%-1%9%1%7% Used parental control software to block risky or unsafe web sites 7% -1%-2%1%10%-3%-2%3%-3%-2%-1%9%-1% -2%3%-2%-3%-4%-1%-2%-1%1%2%0% Asked my school to look out for others who might be bullying me online 5% -1%0%4%11%-2%-5%4%-2%-3%-1%11%2%-1%-4%-3% -5% -1% 1%0%1%3% Asked my school to look out for me bullying others online 4% 2%3%6%1%-1% 1%0% -1%2%1%-1% 0%-1% 1%0% 2%1%2% Done something else about online bullying 1% -6% -7%-11%15% 0%-4%-2% -9% -11%3%14%31%0%28%4%-4%-6%-8%-7%-9%-4% Red = Above Average White = Average Blue = Below Average Difference from the WW Average

28 28 The Relationship Between Steps Taken and Online Bullying Is Misleading Other research suggests that most parents take steps to prevent online bullying AFTER a negative experience. Presumably, parents increase the number of steps taken to protect their children in response to one or more negative events. This helps explain why online bullying and the number of steps taken move in the same direction.

29 29 Most Schools Have No Formal Policies or Education to Address Online Bullying Q9. Does your school have any of the following? If you don’t know, ask your parent. Less than one in four schools has a formal policy. Only one-third of schools provides education and most of that is reserved for students. Although we cannot tell which came first, it appears that formal policy creation is more of an impetus for providing education vs. education as an impetus for establishing formal policies. Have A Formal Policy (55% Also Provide Education) Have A Formal Policy (55% Also Provide Education) Provide Education (34% Also Have A Formal Policy) Provide Education (34% Also Have A Formal Policy) 23% Have a Formal Policy 23% Have a Formal Policy 45% No Formal Policy or Education 45% No Formal Policy or Education 37% Provide Education 37% Provide Education

30 30 School Policy: Country/Region Detail Q9. Does your school have any of the following? If you don’t know, ask your parent. WWUSCAAUINJPMYSGCZPLRUCNARBREGMAPKQATRAEFRDEITNOESUK Has a formal written policy 15%21%20%23%11%-10%-12%-1%-9%-5%-12%8%-9%-4%-1%-3%-13%25%-15% 0%-3%-6%19%-9%12% Has a separate policy for addressing online bullying vs. physical/at- school bullying 13% 12%15%7%-7%-11%2%-7%-6%-4%16%-5%3%-5%-10%-11%-7%-13% 0%-5%5%10%-1%8% Provides education for teachers 16%12%18% 10%-13%-7%7%1%-5%-8%10%-10%8%-8%1% -3%-10%-7%8%-3%-8%-2%-8%6% Provides education for parents 16%12%15%21%16%-8%-9%13%-6%-8%-10%15%-9%6%-8%-6%-5%-2%-10% 6%-3%-5%-3%0%6% Provides education for students 28%17%30%36%15%-5%-15%30%11%-12%-7%14%-16%6%-20%-15%-22%-12%-26%-20%15%-7%-13%-4%-8%25% Home schooled7%-3%-6%-5%-6%7%-7% 5%7%-4%7%49%-3%-4% -6%-1%-6%-7%-3%-5%-7%31%-5% None of these45%-19%-20%-26%-22%8%31%-20%-7%11%20%-25%-23%-6%15%27%26%2%37%39%-29%12%13%-9%-19%-17% Red = Above Average White = Average Blue = Below Average Difference from the WW Average

31 31 Appendix

32 32 Hours Online per Week Q3. About how many hours **per week** do you use the Internet?

33 33 © 2012 Microsoft Corporation. This material is provided for informational purposes only. Microsoft makes no warranty, express or implied.”


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