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STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES (SLOs) 1 Dr. Lori Stollar LIU, Division of Educational Services.

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Presentation on theme: "STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES (SLOs) 1 Dr. Lori Stollar LIU, Division of Educational Services."— Presentation transcript:

1 STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES (SLOs) 1 Dr. Lori Stollar LIU, Division of Educational Services

2 Session Goals Develop an Understanding of Student Learning Objectives Develop an Understanding of the SLO process 2

3 Norms & Expectations for Today’s Session A sk Questions E ngage Fully I ntegrate New Information O pen Your Mind to Diverse Views U tilize What You Learn 3

4 PDE’s Definition: A process to document a measure of educator effectiveness based on student achievement of content standards. 4 Student Learning Objective 4

5 5

6 6

7 PDE’s Definition: A process to document a measure of educator effectiveness based on student achievement of content standards. 7 Student Learning Objective 7

8 8

9 General Description Contains demographic information about the educational setting Articulates the course, grade(s), and students on which the SLO is based Provides class size, frequency, and duration data 9 Section 1: Classroom Context

10 General Description Contains a statement about the “enduring understanding” or “big idea” Provides the specific PA standards used in developing SLOs and are the foundation of performance measures. Articulates a rationale providing reasons why the Goal Statement and targeted standards address important learning. 10 Section 2: SLO Goal

11 General Description Identifies all performance measures, including name, purpose, type, and metric Articulates the administration and scoring details, including the reporting Note: Section 3 is based upon high-quality performance measured aligned to the targeted content standards 11 Section 3: Performance Measures

12 General Description Articulates targets the expected level of achievement for each Performance Measure Includes all students in the identified SLO group May include a focused student group Affords opportunity to link indicators and/or weighting 12 Section 4: Performance Indicators

13 General Description Identifies each level (Failing, Needs Improvement, Proficient, Distinguished) students are meeting the PI targets. Reflects an “expectations continuum” established by the educator prior to the evaluation period and then examined at the end of the evaluation period. Selects the overall SLO rating. 13 Section 5: Teacher Expectations

14 Guiding Principles SLOs should: 1.Represent student performance in a specific course/content area taught by the educator. 2.Align to a targeted set of content standards that represent the depth and breadth of the goal statement. 3.Contain results from only high-quality performance measures collected in an equitable, verifiable, and standardized manner. 4.Use metrics based on two time-bound events/data collection periods and/or summative performance with defined levels of achievement. 5.Include performance indicators linked to performance measures. 14

15 The SLO process contains three (3) phases: I.Design (ing): thinking, conceptualizing, organizing, discussing, researching II.Build (ing): selecting, developing, sharing, completing III.Review (ing): refining, checking, updating, editing, testing, finalizing 15 SLO Process Components

16 16 SLO Process Components DESIGN Thinking about what content standards to measure Organizing standards and measures Discussing collective goals with colleagues Researching what is needed for a high quality SLO

17 17 SLO IN PRACTICE

18 18 Section 1: Classroom Context ElementDefinition 1a. NameEducator’s full name 1b. SchoolName of school(s) to which the educator is assigned during the current year. 1c. DistrictName of district to which the educator is assigned during the current year. 1d. Class/Course TitleName of the class/course upon which the SLO is based. 1e. Grade LevelGrade level(s) for those students included within class/course identified in Element 1d. 1f. Total # of Students Aggregate number of students (estimated, across multiple sections) for which data will be collected and applied to this SLO. 1g. Typical Class Size The “average” number of students in a single session of the class/course identified in Element 1d. 1h. Class Frequency The frequency and time frame in which the class/course identified in Element 1d is delivered. 1i. Typical Class Duration The average number of minutes allocated to deliver a “session” of the class/course identified in Element 1d.

19 19 Section 1: Art Example

20 20 What is a Goal Statement? Definition: Narrative articulating the “big idea” upon which the SLO is based Characteristics: Central to the content area Foundational concept for later subjects/courses

21 21 Section 2: Art Example

22 22 Goal Statements Typically addresses: WHAT the “big idea” is in the standards HOW the skills and knowledge support future learning WHY the “big idea” is a central, enduring concept (rationale statement) PDE’s SAS portal has identified “big ideas” for most content areas.

23 23 Goal Statement Example “Apply the concepts and the competencies of nutrition, eating habits, and safe food preparation techniques to overall health and wellness throughout the life cycle at individual, family, and societal levels.”

24 YOUR TURN With a partner, review the Goal Statement Examples provided. Identify the What, How, and Why of each goal statement. 24

25 GOAL STATEMENT EXAMPLES DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF NUMERIC RELATIONSHIPS BY ANALYZING AND GENERALIZING THOSE RELATIONSHIPS USING WORDS, GRAPHS, TABLES, EQUATIONS AND INEQUALITIES USING TECHNOLOGY. (ALGEBRA) THE STUDENT WILL DEMONSTRATE, THROUGH THEIR WRITTEN WORKS, THAT AUDIENCES DIFFER AND THAT READERS’ NEEDS/EXPECTATIONS MUST BE TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT AS ONE WRITES. (LANGUAGE ARTS) THE STUDENT WILL UNDERSTAND THAT INVESTIGATIONS ARE CONDUCTED TO EXPLORE NEW PHENOMENA, CHECK PREVIOUS RESULTS, AND TO TEST AND COMPARE THEORIES. (SCIENCE) READERS WILL COMPREHEND TEXT BY INTENTIONALLY INTERACTING WITH IT. (LANGUAGE ARTS) NUMBER SENTENCES ARE ABLE TO BE MODELED BY CONCRETE OBJECTS AND REAL WORLD SCENARIOS SIMULTANEOUSLY. (ELEMENTARY MATH) 25

26 26 Section 2: SLO Goal ElementDefinition 2a. Goal Statement Narrative articulating the “big idea” upon which the SLO is based. 2b. PA Standards References the PA Standards that align with the Goal Statement. Numeric references to PA Standards are found at: http://www.pdesas.org/standard/views References additional professional organization standards that align to the Goal Statement. 2c. Rationale Narrative providing reasons why the Goal Statement and the aligned standards address important learning for this class/course.

27 27 Targeted Standards Choosing Targeted Standards means: Selecting certain standards for use with the performance measure being developed. Identifying standards which represent the “big ideas” within the content area.

28 28 Targeted Standards Criteria Are a refined list of the content standards. Represent the essential knowledge and skills that students are expected to acquire. Are the standards upon which educators will spend the most time. Create transparency for families and the community about what is most important for student success. Are the identified content standards used to create the performance measures.

29 29 Guiding Questions ENDURANCE- Will this standard provide students with knowledge and skills of value beyond a single test date? LEVERAGE- Does this standard provide knowledge and skills of value in multiple disciplines? READINESS FOR THE NEXT LEVEL OF LEARNING- Will this standard provide students with essential knowledge and skills necessary for success in the next level of instruction?

30 30 Standard IdDescriptionRationale ACTFL 1.1 WL 1.1—Students listen and respond, engage in conversations, provide and obtain information, express preferences, emotions and feelings, and exchange opinions and beliefs. (Interpersonal) To achieve functional levels of communicative competence in a world language, students need to use the language regularly in everyday social interactions such as conversing, arguing, criticizing, requesting, convincing and explaining effectively. ACTFL 1.2 WL 1.2—Students comprehend and interpret written and oral language on a variety of topics. (Interpretive) Developing literacy in a world language is a crucial 21 st century skill. Students need to develop a variety of reading and listening strategies that will allow them to comprehend, analyze and synthesize information. ACTFL 1.3WL 1.3—Students present information, concepts and ideas in oral and written form on a variety of topics. (Presentational) Students need the ability to gather, comprehend, evaluate, synthesize and report information and ideas. The need to conduct research and consume media intended for speakers of other languages are crucial 21 st Century skills. Targeted Standards Example

31 YOUR TURN 31 Goal Statement Template Use big ideas from SAS or district curriculum to complete Goal Statement and Rationale Indicate goal statement Given the goal statement, identify the underlying content standards

32 32 SLO Process Components BUILD Selecting the performance measure(s) Developing targets and expectations Completing the template Sharing the draft materials with other colleagues

33 General Description Identifies all performance measures, including name, purpose, type, and metric Articulates the administration and scoring details, including the reporting Note: Section 3 is based upon high-quality performance measures aligned to the targeted content standards (see Assessment Literacy Series- ALS materials) Section 3: Performance Measures 33

34 Principles of Well-Developed Measures Measures must: Be built to achieve the designed purpose Produce results that are used for the intended purpose Align to targeted content standards Contain a balance between depth and breadth of targeted content Be standardized, rigorous, and fair Be sensitive to testing time and objectivity Have score validity and reliability evidence 34

35 35 Section 3: Performance Measures Formerly Section 4 ElementDefinition 4a. Name (5 entry spaces are provided throughout Section 4, but 5 are not required) List the name of each Performance Measure. 4b. Type Identify the type(s) of Performance Measure(s). From the given list, select all types that are applicable. 4c. Purpose The purpose statement for each Performance Measure that addresses who, what, why. 4d. MetricThe metric used by the Performance Measure to evaluate the Performance Indicator. 4e. Administration Frequency The timeframe during the school year that the Performance Measures are administered to students. For Performance Measures administered more than one time, the frequency (e.g., quarterly) is annotated. 4f. Adaptation / Accommodations Identifies and lists any unique adaptations or special accommodations needed for IEP, ELL, Gifted IEP, or Others to complete the tasks within each Performance Measure.

36 36 Section 3: Art Example Formerly Section 4

37 37 Section 3: Art Example Formerly Section 4

38 General Description Articulates targets for each Performance Measure Includes all students in the identified SLO group May include a focused student group Affords opportunity to link and/or weight indicators Section 4: Performance Indicators Formerly Section 3 38

39 39 Section 4: Performance Indicators Formerly Section 3 ElementDefinition 3a. Performance Indicator (PI) Targets: All Student Group (5 entry spaces are provided, but 5 are not required) A description of the expected level of achievement for each student in the SLO population (as defined in Element 1f) based on the scoring tool(s) used for each Performance Measure (as listed in Element 4a). 3b. Performance Indicator (PI) Targets: Focused Student Group (optional) (5 entry spaces are provided, but 5 are not required) A description of the expected level of achievement for each student in a subset of the SLO population (as defined in Element 1F) based on the scoring tool(s) used for each Performance Measure (as listed in Element 4a). Subset populations can be identified through prior student achievement data or through content-specific pre-test data. 3c. PI Linked (optional) A description of any Performance Measures for which a student must meet a specific achievement level in order to meet achievement levels on additional Performance Measures. 3d. PI Weighting (optional) An assignment of proportional values among PIs prior to aggregation and application to Section 5. Weighting can be applied when there is more than one Performance Indicator.

40 40 Section 4: Art Example Formerly Section 3

41 YOUR TURN Based on your Goal Statement and Content Standards, determine Performance Measures that will measure your goal. Determine the desired targets (or Performance Indicators) for each Performance Measure. 41

42 General Description Classifies percentages of students who are meeting the Performance Indicator targets into four levels: Failing, Needs Improvement, Proficient, and Distinguished. Selects the overall Elective rating. Section 5: Teacher Expectations 42

43 43 Section 5: Teacher Expectations ElementDefinition 5a. Level Four levels of projected performance regarding the PI, reflecting a continuum established by the educator prior to the evaluation period. Each performance level (i.e., Failing, Needs Improvement, Proficient, and Distinguished) is populated with a percentage range such that 0% to 100% meeting expectations is distributed among the levels. 5b. Elective Rating Given the actual performance regarding the PI, the principal or evaluator identifies one of four performance levels. This section is not completed until after performance data are collected, reviewed, and evaluated against each Performance Indicator, and in the aggregate, against 5a criteria. Notes/ Explanation Provides space for the educator to articulate influences, factors, and other conditions associated with the assigned rating as well as to reflect on purposeful review of the data. This section is not completed until after performance data are collected, reviewed, and evaluated against each Performance Indicator, and in the aggregate, against 5a criteria.

44 44 Section 5: Art Example

45 Section 5: Teacher Expectations (cont.) PI #1 Jumping PI #2 Hopping PI #3 Sprinting Meet Expectations 255075 Total Number of Students 100 Independent Performance Indicators SLO based on 100 students in each indicator The sum of all students meeting expectations (25 + 50 + 75) The sum of all students (100 + 100 + 100) Resultant: (150/300 =.50 or 50%) 45

46 46 Student Learning Objective GOAL STATEMENT RATING PERFORMANCE INDICATOR PERFORMANCE MEASURE ALL STUDENTS TARGETED STUDENTS

47 47 SLO Process Components REVIEW Checking the drafted SLO (including the performance measures) for quality Refining measures and targets Editing text and preparing discussion points/highlights for principal Finalizing materials Updating completed SLO with performance data

48 48 Training Resources SAS is the PDE website (www.pdesas.org) containing:www.pdesas.org Pennsylvania content standards and other helpful PDE developed material a downloadable SLO training “packet”, including SLO Models links to Research in Action’s training platform, Homeroom Homeroom is RIA’s web-based learning platform (http://www.ria2001.org) containing:http://www.ria2001.org on-line training materials, including the SLO Process Template downloadable SLO training files, except the videos links to the SAS portal

49 Videos Describe the procedures within each of the three phases (i.e., Design, Build, & Review) Guides Provide examples and information about a process Templates Assist in developing customized material “Other Stuff” Supplements the core training materials 49 Tool Organization

50 SLO DESIGN, BUILD, REVIEW: USING PDE’S ONLINE TOOLS TO IMPLEMENT THE SLO PROCESS SAS PORTAL: WWW.PDESAS.ORGWWW.PDESAS.ORG

51 Navigate to the homeroom page: RIA Homeroom site.

52 Log in and if not a user then register for the site: Pause until entire room is registered or with a partner:

53 Home Page for information: Open SLOs

54 The SLO Box expands…………..

55 Joining the SLO Professional Learning Community on SAS. Go to the SAS home page(www.pdesas.org )www.pdesas.org Log in with your user name and password. If you do not have an account with SAS you will have to create one.

56 Enter your information on the log in page and submit.

57 Once you have successfully logged in and are at the SAS home page, go to Teacher Tools in the upper right corner.

58 Click on Teacher Tools, this will provide you with various tools. Locate the button labeled “My Communities.”

59 This will open your membership to various Professional Learning Communities. If you are not a member of the Student Learning Objectives PLC, type SLO in the search bar.

60 Once a member of the SLO community you will have access to communication with all other members and a calendar of upcoming events.

61 Along with posting questions to the entire community you have access to the Digital Repository, in which SLO training materials and supporting documents are located. (This is located at the bottom of the SLO community page.)


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