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Introduction to Wellness, Fitness, and Lifestyle Management Mrs.Wheeler / Mr. Rath Chapters 1 & 2 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

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Presentation on theme: "Introduction to Wellness, Fitness, and Lifestyle Management Mrs.Wheeler / Mr. Rath Chapters 1 & 2 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved."— Presentation transcript:

1 Introduction to Wellness, Fitness, and Lifestyle Management Mrs.Wheeler / Mr. Rath Chapters 1 & 2 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

2 HLT 116 Personal Wellness Dual Enrollment Course Ms. Amy Wheeler, Instructor Mr. Paul Rath, Instructor © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.2

3 Course Information SYLLABUS HIGHLIGHTS Fit and Well book Attendance Participation Tardiness / Excused and Unexcused Absences Test procedures Final exam schedule Introduction to Text Book Pg. XVI Instructor Web Pages: http://staff.harrisonburg.k12.va.us/~awheeler/ http://staff.harrisonburg.k12.va.us/~prath/

4 Course Organization Module 1: Components of Fitness –Project 1 – Fitness Lab Module 2: Self-Management –Project 2 - Supertracker Module 3: Becoming an Informed Consumer –Project 3 - Quackery Module 4: Disease and Chronic Injury –Project 4 – Lifetime Plan

5 Coming Up Next Time… Read—Chapter 1 –Be familiar with Key Terms Complete Lab 1.2 Handout –DO NOT Write In the Textbook!!! “SMART” Goals –Brainstorm 1 aspect of each of the 6 Dimensions of Wellness that you want to improve. –Draft a SMART goal for each of those areas.

6 Course Topics Health, wellness, fitness, healthy lifestyles Components of fitness and wellness Cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes Goal setting and program planning Self-management skills Substance use and abuse Nutrition Stress Becoming an informed consumer

7 Goals of the Course This course is for ALL fitness levels and abilities. To learn about oneself intellectually, emotionally, and physically and to consider the connections between values and behavior. To explore how individuals develop and function in the social, psychological, emotional, physical, and spiritual dimensions. To plan for a lifetime of fitness, wellness, and physical activity.

8 Introduction to Wellness, Fitness, and Lifestyle Management Mrs.Wheeler / Mr. Rath Chapter 1 pgs. 1 - 28 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

9 Learning Objectives A.Differentiate between skill-related and health-related fitness. Be able to provide examples of each. B.Identify the major health problems in the United States today, and discuss their causes. C.Describe how much physical activity is recommended for developing health and fitness. D.Be able to write a SMART goal and identify each component of a SMART goal.

10 Wellness: The New Health Goal (pg. 2) Health refers to a overall condition of a person’s body or mind and to the presence or absence of illness or injury. –Differs based on factors beyond your control, such as genes, age, and family history Wellness refers to optimal health and vitality –Is determined by the decisions you make about the way you live Enhanced wellness involves making conscious decisions to control one’s risk factors that contribute to illness and injury. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved 10

11 The Dimensions of Wellness ( pgs. 2 – 4) The 6 Dimensions of Wellness: Physical wellness Emotional wellness Intellectual wellness Spiritual wellness Interpersonal wellness Environmental wellness The process of achieving wellness is constant and dynamic © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved 11

12 Figure 1.1 The Wellness Continuum (pg. 2) © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved 12

13 Other Aspects of Wellness (pg. 4) Occupational and Financial Wellness –Most experts feel that these are also very important dimensions of wellness –Occupational wellness refers to the level of happiness and fulfillment you gain through your work. –Financial wellness refers to your ability to live within your means and manage your money. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved 13

14 New Opportunities / New Responsibilities (pgs. 4 - 6) 1900 - Infectious diseases caused the majority of deaths Since 1900, present life expectancy has doubled due to the development of vaccines and antibiotics. –This gives rise to the emergence of new major health threats. Heart disease Cancer Stroke © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved 14

15 Table 1.2 Leading Causes of Death (pg. 6) © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved 15

16 Healthy People Initiative (pgs. 6 - 11) The National Healthy People Initiative aims to prevent disease and improve Americans’ quality of life The latest report, Healthy People 2020 proposes 4 broad goals: –Eliminate preventable disease, disability, injury and premature death. –Achieve health equity, eliminate disparities, and improve health of all groups. –Create social and physical environments that promote good health for all. –Promote healthy development and healthy behaviors across every stage of life. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved 16

17 Figure 1.3 Quantity of Life versus Quality of Life (pg. 4) © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved 17

18 Reaching Wellness Through Lifestyle Management (pgs. 11 - 13 ) Behaviors that contribute to wellness This lifestyle management is called behavior change. Before you can start this process, consider the following: Examine your current health habits –Consider how your current lifestyle is affecting your health Choose a target behavior –Pick one behavior to change Learn about your target behavior –Take into consideration the risks and rewards of changing that behavior Find help through resources available © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 18

19 Building Motivation to Change (pgs. 13 - 16) Examine the pros and cons of change –Evaluate the short- and long-term benefits and costs Boost self-efficacy through : Locus of Control –Internal or external Visualization and Self-talk –Seeing yourself engaging in a new and healthy behavior Role models and other supportive individuals Identify and overcome barriers to change © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 19

20 Enhancing Your Readiness to Change (pg. 16) The Transtheoretical, or “stages of change,” model for behavior change: Stages of Change: –Precontemplation—people do not think they have a problem and have no intention of changing behavior –Contemplation—people know they have a problem and are intending to take action within 6 months –Preparation—people plan to take action within a month –Action—people outwardly modify their behavior and environment –Maintenance—successful behavior change for 6 months or longer –Termination—people are no longer tempted by the behavior which they have changed © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 20

21 © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 21 The Stages of Change: A Spiral Model (pg. 16)

22 Dealing with Relapse (pgs. 16 - 17) People seldom travel down the stages of change in a linear, straightforward manner.  Research proves that it may take multiple attempts to change one’s behavior.  4 out of 5 people experience some degree of backsliding If you experience a lapse or relapse, here are steps to get you back on track: 1.Forgive yourself 2.Give yourself credit for your progress you have already made 3.Move on © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 22

23 Developing Skills for Change: Creating a Personalized Plan (pgs. 17 - 20) Putting together a plan of action 1. Monitor your behavior and gather data 2. Analyze the data and identify patterns 3. Be “Smart” and set specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time frame-specific goals. 4. Devise a plan of action Get what you need Modify your environment Control related habits Reward yourself Involve people around you Plan for challenges 5. Make a personal contract © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 23

24 Goal Setting (pgs. 17 - 20) S pecific : detailed behavior to achieve M easurable : must assess progress A ttainable/alterable : make adjustments as needed R ealistic : consider heredity, time, etc… T ime-based : set a date for achievement  Always state goals in a positive way  Try to choose performance-oriented goals

25 Staying with It (pgs. 20 – 21) Social influences Levels of motivation and commitment Choice of techniques and level of effort Stress barrier Procrastinating, rationalizing, and blaming © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.25

26 Introduction to Wellness, Fitness, and Lifestyle Management Ms.Wheeler / Mr. Rath Chapter 2 pgs. 29 - 60 © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

27 Types of Fitness Health-related fitness Skill-related fitness

28 Physical Activity on a Continuum (pg. 30) Physical activity is movement carried out by the skeletal muscles that requires energy Exercise refers to planned, structured, and repetitive movement intended to improve or maintain physical fitness Levels of fitness depend on the following: Heart’s ability to pump blood Energy-generating capacity of the cells Physical activity is essential to health and confers a wide variety of health benefits © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 28

29 Components of Health-related Fitness (pgs. 34 - 36) There are 5 areas of fitness which help establish health benefits Health-related fitness helps you withstand physical challenges and protects you from diseases The 5 components: Cardiorespiratory Fitness Muscular Strength Muscular Endurance Flexibility Body Composition © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 29

30 Skill-Related Components of Fitness (pgs. 36 - 37) Speed: the ability to perform a movement in a short amount of time. Power: the ability to exert force rapidly, based on a combination of strength and speed. Agility: the ability to change the position of the body quickly and accurately. Balance: the ability to maintain equilibrium while moving or while stationary Coordination: the ability to perform a motor tasks accurately and smoothly using body movements and the senses. Reaction and Movement Time: the ability to respond and react quickly to a stimulus. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 30 Skill-related fitness tends to be sport specific and is best developed through practice

31 Physical Activity Pyramid Physical Activity Pyramid (pg. 43) © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 31

32 Cardiorespiratory Fitness (pgs. 34 - 37) (Cooper’s Test 12 min run) Ability to perform prolonged, large muscle, dynamic exercise at moderate to high levels of intensity. –Depends on the ability of the lungs to deliver oxygen from the environment to the bloodstream and the efficiency of the heart and nervous system When cardiorespiratory fitness improves: –The heart pumps more blood per heartbeat –Resting heart rate slows –Blood volume increases –Blood supply to tissue improves –The body can cool itself better –Resting blood pressure decreases Activities should be continuous, rhythmic movements of large muscle groups. Cardiorespiratory endurance exercise examples: Walking Jogging Cycling Aerobic dancing © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 32

33 Muscle Strength and Endurance (pgs. 34 - 37) (Bench Press and 60% of 1rm max) Muscular Strength is the amount of force a muscle can produce in a single maximum effort Muscular Endurance is the ability to resist fatigue and sustain a given level of muscle tension for a given time. Benefits include: Increased body mass Increased metabolism Increased bone density Reduced effects of sarcopenia Improved self-confidence and ability to manage stress Improved posture and reduction of low back pain Can Muscular Strength and Muscular Endurance increase aerobic capacity? Can either decrease aerobic capacity? © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 33

34 Flexibility (pgs. 34 - 37) (V-Sit and Reach) The ability to move the joints through their full range of motion Flexibility is affected by many factors such as joint structure, length and elasticity of connective tissue, and nervous system activity. Flexibility is needed in everyday routines. Benefits include: Lowered risk of back injuries Promotion of good posture and decreased risk of other joint injuries Reduction in age-related stiffness © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 34

35 Body Composition (pgs. 34 - 37) (BMI and %Body Fat) The proportion of fat and fat-free mass (muscle, bone, water) in the body Healthy body composition is comprised of high levels of fat-free mass and an acceptable low level of body fat. The relative amount of body fat a person has does have an impact upon overall health and fitness. Too much body fat could have the following effects: Heart disease Insulin resistance High blood pressure Stroke Joint problems Type II Diabetes Gallbladder disease Cancer Back pain The best way to lose fat is through exercise and a sensible diet. © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 35

36 Principles of Physical Training: Adaptation to Stress Principles of Physical Training: Adaptation to Stress (pg. 37) The goal of physical training is to produce these long- term changes and improvements in the body’s functioning. Over time, immediate, short-term adjustments translate into long-term changes and improvements. These principles include: –Specificity: the training principle that the body adapts to the particular type and amount of stress placed on it. –Progressive overload: the training principle that places increasing amounts of stress on the body causes adaptations that improve fitness (FITT Principle). © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 36

37 Principles of Physical Training: Adaptation to Stress Principles of Physical Training: Adaptation to Stress (pg. 37) –Reversibility: the training principle that the body will return to its original homeostatic state when amount of physical stress is removed for a specific time. –Individual differences: each individual’s body adapts to the stress differently. © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 37

38 Specificity: Adapting to Type of Training (pg. 38) To develop a particular fitness or skill component, you must perform exercises designed specifically for that component; this is the principle of specificity. Weight training will develop muscular strength but will not be very effective in improving cardiorespiratory endurance or flexibility. A well-rounded exercise program includes all components of fitness designed to improve different parts of the body or towards specific sport activities © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 38

39 Progressive Overload: Adapting to Amount of Training and the FITT Principle (pg. 38 - 40) The amount of overload is important since too little will not have much effect upon fitness levels, and too much will increase the likelihood of an injury. Progression is critical since exercising at the same levels will not provide adaptations and can lead to a plateau. FITT: a principle for overload –Frequency—How often –Intensity—How hard –Time—How long (duration) –Type—Mode of activity © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 39

40 Reversibility: Adapting to a Reduction in Training (pg. 40) The body adjusts to low levels of activity the same way that it does to higher levels. Fitness is a reversible adaptation. If you stop exercising, up to 50% of fitness improvements are lost within 2 months. Not all fitness improvements are lost within 2 months. Strength fitness can be maintained as infrequently as once a week compared to cardiovascular or cellular fitness levels. © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 40

41 Designing Your Own Exercise Program (pgs. 38 - 44) Medical clearance –Men under the age of 40 and women under 50: exercise is probably safe –PAR-Q Assessing yourself –Assess you fitness level for all 5 health-related fitness components Set goals Choose activities for a balanced program © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 41

42 Guidelines for Training (pg. 44 - 48) Train the way you want your body to change Train regularly Start slowly and get in shape gradually Warm up before exercise Cool down after exercise Exercise safely Listen to your body, and get adequate rest Cycle the volume and intensity of your workouts Vary your activities Try training with a partner Train your mind Fuel your activity appropriately Have fun Track your progress Keep your exercise program in perspective © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 42

43 Health and fitness benefits of different amounts of physical activity and exercise (pg. 44) © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 43

44 Progression of an Exercise Program (pg. 45) © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved. 44

45 AM Resting Heart Rate for Next Class © 2011 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved 45 Please take your AM pulse rate for the next class period. 1.Have a digital or a second hand clock next to your bed. 2.Find pulse. Place two fingers on your Carotid Artery. 3.Take pulse for one minute. 4.Do this three times and get the average pulse rate.


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