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March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 1 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Project: IEEE P802.15 Working Group for Wireless Personal.

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Presentation on theme: "March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 1 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Project: IEEE P802.15 Working Group for Wireless Personal."— Presentation transcript:

1 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 1 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Project: IEEE P802.15 Working Group for Wireless Personal Area Networks Submission Title: [Co-existence of 60 GHz window links and indoor WLAN system] Date Submitted: [March 2005] Source: [Gregg Levin] Company [BridgeWave Communications] Address [3350 Thomas Road, Santa Clara, CA 95054] Voice: [(408) 567-6999], E-Mail: [greggl@bridgewave.com] Re: [] Abstract: [] Purpose:[Contribution to 802.15 SG3c at March 2005 meeting in Atlanta, GA] Notice:This document has been prepared to assist the IEEE P802.15. It is offered as a basis for discussion and is not binding on the contributing individual(s) or organization(s). The material in this document is subject to change in form and content after further study. The contributor(s) reserve(s) the right to add, amend or withdraw material contained herein. Release:The contributor acknowledges and accepts that this contribution becomes the property of IEEE and may be made publicly available by P802.15.

2 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 2 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Objectives  Consider potential co-existence risks between: o60 GHz point-to-point “window links” o60 GHz indoor WLAN/WPAN system  Desired outcome oReach a common understanding of issues between: WCA 60 GHz sub-committeeWCA 60 GHz sub-committee IEEE 802.15 SG3cIEEE 802.15 SG3c oConsider means to mitigate co-existence concerns oGain support of SG3c for WCA FCC petition

3 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 3 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Companies Driving Initiative  BridgeWave Communications oSupplier of low-cost gigabit 60 + GHz products  Ceragon Networks oSupplier of high-capacity MMW links  6015, Inc. oNew 60 GHz product startup  YDI/Terabeam oSupplier of high-speed license-free wireless links

4 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 4 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Importance of 60 GHz products  Lowest cost wireless option providing: oMulti-gigabit capacity oLicense-free operation oStrong interference immunity o500 + meter link distances  Growth path for 10-100 Mbps 5 GHz wireless users oSmall/medium enterprises oCompetitive service provides oWISPs

5 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 5 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Current 60 GHz rules  License-free operation under Part 15.255  Rules designed around wireless LAN usage o500 mW peak power limit – 15.255(e) o3-meter power density limits – 15.255(b)(1) 9 uW/cm 2 average9 uW/cm 2 average 18 uW/cm 2 peak18 uW/cm 2 peak oTransmitter IDs for access point coordination – 15.255(i)

6 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 6 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Limitations of current rules  PTP distance limited by power density rule – 15.255(b)(1) oPower density rule effectively limits power to 0-10 dBm o12” antenna limited to 700 meters (typical for most U.S. cities) oApplication “sweet spot” is up to 1500 meters  Power density rules problematic for PTP antennas o3-meter distance typically within near field oDirect PD measurements difficult/expensive oMethods/results vary between test labs  PTP through-window link rules unclear – 15.255(i) oWindow links mitigate roof access/wiring issues – speeds deployment oUncertainty discourages usage

7 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 7 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Objectives of rule changes  Increase PTP link distances o# building pairs increases with square of the distance oLow-cost 1000 + meter (typical) link 1-foot antennas, Tx = +17dBm 11-foot antennas, Tx = +17dBm 1 > 2X increase in building pairs> 2X increase in building pairs oLong-range 1500 + meter (typical) link 2-foot antennas, Tx = +27dBm2-foot antennas, Tx = +27dBm > 4X increase in building pairs> 4X increase in building pairs  Simplify PTP compliance testing  Clarify PTP window link Tx ID rule  Comply with general population MPE limits 1 +22dBm new rule limit

8 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 8 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Proposed changes 1.Provide EIRP-based alternative to existing in- band power density rule – 15.255(b)(1) Limit average EIRP to:Limit average EIRP to: 82dBm - 2dB per dB antenna gain below 51dBi 82dBm - 2dB per dB antenna gain below 51dBi Vendors may choose to meet current or new ruleVendors may choose to meet current or new rule 2.Explicitly exempt window links from transmitter ID requirement – 15.255(i) 3.No changes to: Peak power limit – 15.255(e)Peak power limit – 15.255(e) Out-of-band emission limits – 15.255(c)Out-of-band emission limits – 15.255(c)

9 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 9 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Benefits of EIRP-based power limit  Low-gain antenna radios may use existing PD rule  New rule meets general population MPE limit o1 mW/cm 2 power density limit – Section 1.1310 oBased on OET Bulletin 65 aperture peak power density formula – 4*P/A oSection 1.1310 limits still independently apply  EIRP basis is a natural choice oEasy to determine (antenna far-field gain * power) o2.4 GHz, 5 GHz and E-Band use EIRP rules  Minimal risk of interference issues oOxygen absorption oNarrow beam antennas

10 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 10 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Benefits of clarifying Tx ID rule  Current rule suggests no clear intent to treat window links differently from other outdoor links  Little energy transmitted indoors oEIRP rule requires narrow beam or low power oGood side/back lobe suppression is typical oMinimal indoor wall penetration

11 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 11 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Power limits for 60 GHz radios Ant. diameter (in.) 4 8122448 Approx. gain 1 (dBi) 3339424854 MPE-based power limit 2 (dBm) 1319222834 EIRP-based power limit 3 (dBm) 1319222828 Peak power limit 4 (dBm) 2727272727 1 Gain based on typical 50% efficient antenna using parabolic reflector 2 Average power limit in order to meet Section 1.1310 general population MPE rule (1mW/cm 2 ) using OET Bulletin 65 formula for maximum power density at antenna surface (4*P/A) 3 Average power limit based on meeting proposed average EIRP limit 4 Peak power limit from Section 15.255(e)

12 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 12 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Max. distance examples Ant. Power Miami D.C. Boise Current: 12” +6dBm 500m 700m 900m New low-cost: 12” +17dBm 1 700m 1000m 1300m New long-range: 24” +27dBm 1100m 1500m 2200m Notes: ITU rain zones: Miami(N), D.C.(K), Boise(B) 99.99% availability -55dBm Rx sensitivity 14dB/km O 2 losses 1 +22dBm maximum allowed by proposed rule Distances for most of the U.S. = D.C. or further

13 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 13 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Proposed rule text changes 1. Replace 15.255(b)(1) with the following text: (1) For products other than fixed field disturbance sensors, at least one of the following limits must be met: (i) The average power density of any emission, measured during the transmit interval, shall not exceed 9 uW/cm 2, as measured 3 meters from the radiating structure, and the peak power density of any emission shall not exceed 18 uW/cm 2, as measured 3 meters from the radiating structure. (ii) The average EIRP of any transmitter, measured during the transmit interval, shall be limited to the value of 82 dBm reduced by a factor of 2 dB for every dB that the transmit antenna far field gain is less than 51 dBi. 2. Insert words into the first sentence of 15.255(i) as follows: (i) For all transmissions that emanate from inside a building, except for point-to-point transmissions that are directed outside through a window, within any one second interval of signal transmission,...

14 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 14 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Petition Status  Reviewed with OET staff 7/29/04  Petition filed 10/1/04  Only one negative comment filed  Replied to negative comment 12/15/04  OET agreed to issue NPRM – probably by summer 2005  Comment period will follow  Hopefully will result in rules by end of 2005

15 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 15 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Concern Raised by SG3c  Higher-power window-link signals reflecting from glass may jam WLAN systems

16 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 16 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Framing the Issue  Window links are allowed by current rules  Higher-power increases risk by about 15dB o1-foot antenna 6dBm  21dBm (typical) o2-foot antenna 10dBm  25dBm (typical)  WLAN systems allowed same power levels  Antenna directivity is key consideration oWLAN: 2-14 dBi (smart antennas could be better) oWindow-link: 34-46 dBi  In the end, if there is an interference conflict: oCan it be mitigated by the user? oIf not, should the user be allowed to choose?

17 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 17 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Antenna Directivity  Antenna gain is a far-field figure o1-foot antenna: near-field 36 feet o2-foot antenna: near-field 145 feet oGain can easily be >10dB lower in near-field  However, generally… oIf the antenna gain is very high, then it is only in a very small area oWhere the antenna energy is spread, then its gain is relatively low oThe signal cannot have high gain over a large area  For WLAN close to a window link (WL): oReflective window losses significantly reduce WL total energy o  WL and WLAN will have similar signal levels at some locations o  WLAN transmitters have much higher levels at most locations oSmart WLAN antennas could overcome almost all interference oWLANs with multiple frequency channels can avoid the WL frequencies

18 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 18 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission What about further away?  Free space losses improve WLAN situation  Walls and obstacles severely attenuate signals  As antenna gain rises, then only small areas are impacted

19 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 19 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission What if there is still a problem?  There will not be large numbers of window links oFew buildings and fewer rooms may be affected oThis is a relatively small issue relative to the challenges of creating a major 60GHz WLAN market  It is easy to attenuate a window reflection oRadio itself blocks reflection if path is perpendicular oMount link so that reflection path is blocked by wall oInterpose a barrier – partition, Eccosorb, plants, …  If all else fails, can we allow the user choose? oReflection is not likely to impact others in building oUser can decide which application is most valuable

20 March 2005 Gregg Levin, BridgeWave Communications Slide 20 doc.: IEEE 802.15-05/111r0 Submission Going Forward  WCA would like to work closely with SG3c oResolve any issues before NPRM oFile joint comments, if changes are needed  Value to WCA and 802.15 to provide a unified front oWCA’s petition – more use of 60GHz benefits all in an early market oJoint support for future changes potentially desired by 802.15


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