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Doc.: IEEE 802.18-07/0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 0 Update on Europe and UK SRD and LE Activities July 2007.

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Presentation on theme: "Doc.: IEEE 802.18-07/0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 0 Update on Europe and UK SRD and LE Activities July 2007."— Presentation transcript:

1 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 0 Update on Europe and UK SRD and LE Activities July 2007

2 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 1 Contents Yearly review of EC SRD Decision Update on UWB activities in UK/Europe Update on ITS activities in UK/Europe Update on Multi GBit Systems in 60GHz bands Update on the UK LE SFR Timescales for UK consultation on consolidated proposals for Licence Exemption

3 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 2 EC mandate to ECC to review the technical annex in EC Short Range Devices Decision The EC SRD Decision is mandatory for all member states to implement. The Annex in the Decision covers different tables for specific SRD use in a number of different bands from kHz to 60 GHz including: Generic or Non Specific SRD use Alarms and Social Alarms Inductive Applications Active Medical Implants Wireless Audio Applications Changes been approved by ECC and sent to EC. Decision likely to be amended and approved in either October or December 07. Member States usually given 6 months to implement from publication date.

4 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 3 Proposals for Generic SRD allocations The proposals for changes to the Non Specific SRD use in the Decision include a number of new or changes to use in the following bands ; o New 30 KHz allocation in 6MHz band o New 14 KHz allocation in 13MHz band o Revised technical parameters between – MHz 10 mW max e.r.p / Duty Cycle 10% 1 mW max e.r.p / Duty Cycle 100% for bandwidths > 250KHz the PSD limited is to -13dBm/10 kHz o New allocation between – MHz 10 mW e.r.p / Duty Cycle 100% / max channel spacing 25kHz o New allocation 863 – 870 MHz 25mW e.r.p / Duty Cycle 0.1% or LBT o Revised technical parameters to allow LBT 25mW e.r.p between – MHz – MHz o Revised technical parameters between – to allow LBT 500mW e.r.p o New allocation in – GHz up to 100mW e.i.r.p o New allocation in – GHz up to 100mW e.i.r.p

5 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 4 Other highlights in the changes to Specific Allocations Various new allocations for Inductive applications –Includes RFIDs, devices for car immobilisation, animal identification, alarm systems, cable detection, waste management, personal identification, wireless voice links, access control, proximity sensors, anti-theft systems including RF anti-theft induction systems, data transfer to handheld devices, automatic article identification, wireless control systems and automatic road tolling. Active Medical Implants –New allocation in 9 – 315 KHz, max power 30 dBµA/m at 10m, Duty Cycle 10% Wireless Audio Applications –New Allocation in 87.5 – MHz, 50nW e.r.p (I-trip)

6 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 5 Contents Yearly review of EC SRD Decision Update on UWB activities in UK/Europe Update on ITS activities in UK/Europe Update on Multi GBit Systems in 60GHz bands Update on the UK LE SFR Timescales for UK consultation on consolidated proposals for Licence Exemption

7 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 6 Update on UWB activities in UK/Europe Last Implementation date for member states is August 21 st UK published proposals 5 th June responses received some editorial changes made regs. will be complete by 21 st August 07 ECC have recommended changes to EC UWB Decision limit between 2.7 – 3.4 GHz increased to - 70dBm/MHz limit between 3.4 – 3.8 GHz increased to - 80dBm/MHz restriction on usage in road and rail vehicles

8 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 7 Update on UWB activities in UK/Europe ETSI standard in public enquiry stage has brought out an issue with EC Decision. Wi-Media statement to UK consultation “The draft regulation contains a definition of to be used in the assessment of peak power measurements and specifies a correction factor of 20log(50/x) db where bandwidths other than 50MHz have been used for measurement. Whilst WiMedia appreciates that the format of this correction is drawn form Article 2 of the EC decision, we would draw OFCOM’s attention to the fact that such a correction is valid only for UWB technologies that are pulse based. The technology used in WiMedia Alliance products is Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) modulation which is Gaussian noise like in nature(1). Consequently a correction based on 10log(50/x) would be a more appropriate in this case. This technology distinction has been recognized by the ETSI and provision has been made in the draft EN for both classes of UWB devices to assure fair product assessment as a prerequisite to market access.”

9 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 8 Contents Yearly review of EC SRD Decision Update on UWB activities in UK/Europe Update on ITS activities in UK/Europe Update on Multi GBit Systems in 60GHz bands Update on the UK LE SFR Timescales for UK consultation on consolidated proposals for Licence Exemption

10 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 9 Update on ITS activities in UK/Europe ECC draft response to EC Mandate submitted including an Impact Assessment Final Response to be WGFM meeting September, possible allocations in these bands to ITS 5850 – 5925 MHz 63.0 – 64.0 GHz Response to be EC RSC December Possible outcome is EC Decision for both or any of the bands mentioned.

11 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 10 Contents Yearly review of EC SRD Decision Update on UWB activities in UK/Europe Update on ITS activities in UK/Europe Update on Multi GBit Systems in 60GHz bands Update on the UK LE SFR Timescales for UK consultation on consolidated proposals for Licence Exemption

12 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 11 Update on Multi GBit systems in 60GHz ECC WGSE have completed a number of Reports Competing Demand for Spectrum between Fixed PtP links (57 – 66 GHz) WPAN/WLAN (57 – 66 GHz) ITS (63.0 – 64.0 GHz) Discussion on allocations to take WGFM At present strong lobby in UK/Europe from both PtP and ITS communities Ofcom LEFR consultation promotes possibility of generic LE allocations in these bands.

13 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 12 Contents Yearly review of EC SRD Decision Update on UWB activities in UK/Europe Update on ITS activities in UK/Europe Update on Multi GBit Systems in 60GHz bands Update on the UK LE SFR Timescales for UK consultation on consolidated proposals for Licence Exemption

14 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 13 Delivering on the vision of the SFR In the SFR we suggested an increase in LE spectrum of 1%, relating perhaps to an additional 200MHz at 5GHz Our recent measurements suggest a low level of utilisation of LE spectrum, especially in the existing 5GHz bands Hence, there seems little reason at this stage to extend the LE allocation in these bands We will keep this under review but at present do not expect to provide additional LE spectrum by 2010 at 5GHz

15 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 14 Licence exemption may be appropriate in some cases to maximise the efficient use of the spectrum Ofcom’s main objective is to maximise the efficient use of the spectrum – measured in terms of economic efficiency There are two reasons why making a band licence-exempt might achieve this 1: Higher economic value Making a band LE might result in more economic value than licensing it. To test this we need to make a forward prediction of use under licensed and LE usage 2: Supply exceeds demand In some bands, particularly at very high frequencies, there is more supply than demand and hence licensing imposes an unnecessary bureaucratic burden

16 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 15 A preference for international coordination In general, we prefer the market to achieve coordination and harmonisation through trading and change of use of spectrum in multiple countries However, LE spectrum requires regulatory intervention to identify the spectrum and establish the rules for its operation giving little opportunity for market forces to modify parameters As a result, it would generally be preferable for regulators to coordinate internationally as far as possible in order to achieve harmonised strategies and allocations We will work with CEPT, EC and ITU to aim for a harmonised approach to LE spectrum as far as possible although equally we will not unduly delay our initiatives if harmonisation appears difficult to achieve

17 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 16 Our proposals fall into three key areas Better use of LE spectrum LE above a given frequency LE below a given power level Adoption of shared LE bands but with zoning by power and use of politeness protocols Above 60GHz most of the spectrum can be made LE At similar power levels to UWB usage can be made exempt

18 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 17 Better use of LE (1): Making bands available for a range of applications Some bands are reserved for particular applications (eg DECT) while others are more generally available (eg 2.4GHz) Making a band application-specific tends to reduce the probability of interference but also reduces the utilisation and scope for innovation Similar levels of interference control can be achieved through “zoning” and the use of politeness protocols – this is our preferred approach Zoning The division of the LE bands into those for low power or low utilisation devices and those for higher power/utilisation devices since high power devices tend to crowd out lower power ones. A role for the regulator Politeness protocols Techniques such as “listen before talk” to ensure that all users get a fair share of access to the spectrum and that different technologies do not attempt to drown each other out A role for the standards bodies

19 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 18 Making better use of LE (2): Limited use of light licensing Light licensing is an approach where anyone wanting to use the spectrum has to register their details in a database –Varying degrees of light licensing might require them to resolve interference if it is their fault Benefits include –An ability to coordinate with incumbents such as satellite operators to work around particular geographical areas –Lower risk of interference for users under some regimes In general, we believe that devices will increasingly be able to deliver the same low risk of interference through self-coordination We accept that this is not the case yet and that light licensing will have a role to play We expect to make decreasing use of it over time

20 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 19 LE above a given frequency At higher frequencies the spectrum is increasingly little used –This is due to the poor propagation and high equipment costs The probability of interference is low because of the low range of devices This results in an area of spectrum where supply exceeds demand and hence licensing is unnecessary There is some use in these bands, and given that there is excess supply we propose to leave existing use unchanged Licence- exempt Light-licensed Licensed

21 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 20 Exemption of low-power transmitters Below a certain power level devices generally do not cause material interference The FCC has long had a “Part 15” limit below which devices are allowed to operate without a licence The UWB legislation effectively sets a low power limit in Europe We propose to extend this above 10GHz Below 10GHz the line shows the UWB limits. Above 10GHz the upper line is our proposal for low- sensitivity applications and the lower line for high sensitivity applications

22 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 21 Exemption of low-power transmitters (1)  Radio devices which transmit at sufficiently low power levels do not cause material interference. Such devices are candidates for licence-exemption.  Can we define generic power limits below which all transmitters are exempt from licensing?  The FCC has long had a Part 15 limit below which devices are allowed to operate without a licence.  The UWB legislation effectively sets such power limits in Europe (for transmitter bandwidths greater than 50 MHz).  We propose generic radiation power limits that are: 1) based on UWB limits for frequencies < 10.6 GHz. 2) based on a relaxation of UWB limits for frequencies > 10.6 GHz. and below which all transmitters are exempt from licensing.

23 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 22 Exemption of low-power transmitters (2)  Proposed generic radiation power limits (guidelines): Relaxed limits for underlay co-existence with sensitive (e.g. passive) services (20 dB/decade) Relaxed limits for underlay co-existence with insensitive services (20 dB/decade) UWB Limits 10.6 GHz

24 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 23 Exemption of low-power transmitters (3)  Limits on mean EIRP spectral density, such that aggregate interference from transmitters exceeds 5% of ambient noise with a probability of 0.1%. 2 m  2 Activity factor 100% Min. distance 0.15 m UWB 0.5 m  m  2 2 m  m  m  2 Activity factor 5% Min. distance 2 m  Free-space link-budget deteriorates with the square of frequency for a specific receiver antenna gain.  Increasing EIRPs can be tolerated at higher frequencies, with incumbent receivers experiencing the same marginal degradation in their performance.

25 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 24 The Ofcom licence-exempt spectrum vision We will providing spectrum for licence-exempt use where it will enhance the efficiency of spectrum use Our preference will be for the spectrum to be used by a wide range of applications, subject to regulator-defined constraints on radiated power characteristics, and authorised polite protocols defined by standardisation bodies We support the licence-exempt usage of unused high-frequency bands, especially those above 100 GHz We support the exemption from licensing of all low-power transmissions below the UWB limits (with a relaxation of those limits at frequencies above 10.6 GHz)

26 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 25 Contents Yearly review of EC SRD Decision Update on UWB activities in UK/Europe Update on ITS activities in UK/Europe Update on Multi GBit Systems in 60GHz bands Update on the UK LE SFR Timescales for UK consultation on consolidated proposals for Licence Exemption

27 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 26 Timescales for UK consultation on consolidated proposals for Licence Exemption Consultation due out in September on what we will be proposing to implement. Will include any updates as a result of EC SRD Decision changes. Only LEFR proposal likely to be included in the short term is LE allocations around 60GHz.

28 doc.: IEEE /0060 RRTAG Presentation ©Ofcom Slide 27 Consultation Info For more information on the LEFR consultation –http://www.ofcom.org.uk/consult/condocs/lefr/ For more information on other open Ofcom Consultations –http://www.ofcom.org.uk/consult/condocs/?sector=Radi ocommunications&open=Yes&submit=Go For more information on closed Ofcom Consultations or regulatory statements –http://www.ofcom.org.uk/consult/condocs/?open=No& sector=Radiocommunications


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