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© 2013 E 3 Alliance 2013 CENTRAL TEXAS EDUCATION PROFILE Made possible through the investment of the.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2013 E 3 Alliance 2013 CENTRAL TEXAS EDUCATION PROFILE Made possible through the investment of the."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2013 E 3 Alliance 2013 CENTRAL TEXAS EDUCATION PROFILE Made possible through the investment of the

2 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Education Profile The most comprehensive regional view of education trends and outcomes in the state, including data and information about:  Early childhood education  K-12 enrollment, attendance, and student achievement  High school graduation  College and career readiness  Higher Education enrollment, persistence, and completion Available for download at E3Alliance.org 2

3 © 2013 E 3 Alliance E 3 Alliance Scope of Work 3

4 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Overview Central Texas Economic Profile PK-12 and Higher Education Enrollment Profile Outcome data presentations and discussion 1.Changes in PK-12 Enrollment 2.High School Graduation and Attendance 3.Higher Education Enrollment, Persistence and Completion 4

5 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Economic Profile 5

6 © 2013 E 3 Alliance More Adults in Central Texas Have Some College Experience or Have Obtained a College Degree Educational Attainment of Adults Age 25 and Older 6 Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2007 and 2011, 3-year estimates

7 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Higher Levels of Education in Central Texas Than in Texas Educational Attainment of Adults Age 25 and Older, Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2011, 3-year estimates

8 © 2013 E 3 Alliance The Majority of Adults Without a High School Diploma in Central Texas are Hispanic 8 Source: American Community Survey, 2011, 3-Year Estimates

9 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Texans Without a High School Diploma Hit Soonest and Hardest During Recession 9 Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics-Geographic Profile of Employment and Unemployment,

10 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Median Income Increases Dramatically with Higher Levels of Education 10 Source: American Community Survey, 2011, 5-Year Estimates

11 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Education and Health: Largest Industry in Central Texas 11 Source: Texas Workforce Commission: County Narrative Profile

12 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Education and Health, Professional Business Services, and Hospitality Industries Project Growth 12 Source: Texas Workforce Commission: TRACER Industry Projections

13 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Education and Health, Professional Business Services, and Hospitality Industries Project Growth 13 Source: Texas Workforce Commission: TRACER Industry Projections

14 © 2013 E 3 Alliance PK-12 and Higher Education Enrollment Profile 14

15 © 2013 E 3 Alliance 15

16 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Income Eligible Children In Early Education 3 year old estimates are based on data in 5 County MSA, using ACS 2011 Child Population data, Child Care Subsidy Reports (2012), Head Start Enrollment ( ), and Survey of Regional Pre-K Programs conducted by ESC 13 (2012). 4 year old estimates are based on a sample from E3 analysis of Ready, Set, K! weighted data – for entire E3 Region ( )

17 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Nearly Half of Central Texas Students and Just Over Half of Texas Students Are Hispanic 17

18 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Fewer Students in Central Texas Are or Were Low Income than in Texas, Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 18

19 © 2013 E 3 Alliance 9 of Every 10 Undergraduate Students in Central Texas Attends ACC, UT-Austin, or Texas State 19 Source: THECB: 2013 Texas Public Higher Education Almanac; IPEDS

20 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Only 2 of 10 Students at Austin Community College Attend School Full-time 20 Source: THECB: 2013 Texas Public Higher Education Almanac; IPEDS

21 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Changes in PK-12 Enrollment 21

22 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Significant Growth Across All Grades Over the Last Decade Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of Texas Education Agency AEIS data 22

23 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Student Population Increasing at Twice the State Rate Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of Texas Education Agency AEIS data 23

24 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Fastest Growth is in Suburban Areas Independent Urban Non-Metro Central City Rural Major Suburban Central City Suburban Note: Circle size represents district size Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of Texas Education Agency AEIS data 24

25 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Asian and Hispanic Student Populations Increased Dramatically Over Last Decade Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of Texas Education Agency AEIS data 25

26 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Dramatic Increase in Low Income and ELL Student Populations from 2002 to 2012 Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of Texas Education Agency AEIS data 26

27 © 2013 E 3 Alliance ELL Enrollment Increased Annually 27

28 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Rate of Growth In ELL Enrollment has Slowed Dramatically Since

29 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Discussion What part of this story about changes in PreK through grade 12 enrollment resonated the most for you? What was the biggest surprise? What is one thing from this story that you expect to share with others? 29

30 © 2013 E 3 Alliance High School Graduation and Attendance 30

31 © 2013 E 3 Alliance High School Graduation Rates in Texas and Central Texas are Similar Across Years Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 31

32 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Graduation Rates for Non Low Income Students in Central Texas Similar to Texas Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 32

33 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Graduation Rates for Low Income Students in Central Texas Consistently Lower than in Texas Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 33

34 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Low Income Graduation Rates Among Lowest in State Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 34

35 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Has More Absences on Average Than Texas Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 35

36 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Non-low Income Students Missed About the Same Amount of School As Texas Students Average Number of Absences in High School, by Economic Status, Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 36

37 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Low Income Students Missed More School Than Texas Low Income Students Average Number of Absences by Grade and Economic Status, Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 37

38 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Non-low Income Students Missed The Same Amount of School as Students in Other Urban Areas in Texas Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 38

39 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Central Texas Low Income Students Miss More School Than Students in Almost All Other Urban Areas in Texas Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of PEIMS data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 39

40 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Discussion What part of this story about high school graduation rates and its relationship with attendance resonated the most for you? What was the biggest surprise? What is one thing from this story that you expect to share with others? 40

41 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Higher Education Enrollment, Persistence and Completion 41

42 © 2013 E 3 Alliance No Improvement in Proportion of High School Graduates Enrolling in Texas Higher Ed Institutions 42

43 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Higher Education Enrollment Rates for Non-low Income Graduates Holding Steady Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation and higher education enrollment data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 43

44 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Enrollment Rates for Low Income Graduates Increased Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation and higher education enrollment data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 44

45 © 2013 E 3 Alliance College Enrollment Strongly Related to District’s Proportion of Low-Income Students Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of THECB and NSC data *Out-of-state enrollment estimated from rates 45

46 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Majority of Low Income Graduates Enrolled In Higher Ed Attend 2-Year Colleges Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation and higher education enrollment data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 46

47 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Majority of Low Income Graduates Enrolled In Higher Ed Attend 2-Year Colleges Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of high school graduation and higher education enrollment data at the UT Austin Education Research Center 47

48 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Second Year Persistence Rates Consistent for the Classes of 2005 Through Source: E 3 Alliance analysis of data at the UT Austin Education Research Center

49 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Large Variation in Second Year Persistence Rates by Student Group 49

50 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Large Variation in Second Year Persistence Rates by Student Group 50

51 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Large Variation in Second Year Persistence Rates by Student Group 51

52 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Large Variation in Second Year Persistence Rates by Student Group 52

53 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Second Year Persistence Consistently Higher Among Public 4-year Institutions 53

54 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Second Year Persistence Consistently Higher Among Public 4-year Institutions 54

55 © 2013 E 3 Alliance One in Four Central Texas Graduates Complete College Within 6 Years of Finishing High School of 12,561 HS Graduates 55

56 © 2013 E 3 Alliance One in Ten Low Income Graduates Complete College Within 6 Years of Finishing High School 56

57 © 2013 E 3 Alliance One in Ten Low Income Graduates Complete College Within 6 Years of Finishing High School 57

58 © 2013 E 3 Alliance Discussion What part of this story about Central Texas graduates’ rates of higher education enrollment, persistence, and completion resonated the most for you? What was the biggest surprise? What is one thing from this story that you expect to share with others? 58

59 © 2013 E 3 Alliance The conclusions of this research do not necessarily reflect the opinions or official position of the Texas Education Agency, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, or the State of Texas. E 3 Alliance Susan Dawson, President Shawn Thomas, Director of Research and Policy


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