Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Emerging results from the AEDI: implications for Australia's children Associate Professor Sharon Goldfeld Paediatrician and Research Fellow Centre for.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Emerging results from the AEDI: implications for Australia's children Associate Professor Sharon Goldfeld Paediatrician and Research Fellow Centre for."— Presentation transcript:

1 Emerging results from the AEDI: implications for Australia's children Associate Professor Sharon Goldfeld Paediatrician and Research Fellow Centre for Community Child Health, Royal Children's Hospital Murdoch Childrens Research Institute

2 Centre for Community Child Health A society that is good to children is one with the smallest possible inequalities for children, with the vast majority of them having the same opportunities from birth for health, education, inclusion and participation. (Stanley, Richardson & Prior, 2005)

3 Centre for Community Child Health Overview Why early childhood matters Why literacy matters Why data matter Health and developmental inequalities in Australia: the results of the AEDI Community as a potential platform for change

4 Why early childhood matters

5 Brain development

6 Centre for Community Child Health Building strong foundations Getting the foundations right is important – healthy brain development is a prerequisite for future health and wellbeing.

7 Brain development

8 Key experiences shaping health & development Early language and cognitive stimulation

9 Life course

10

11

12 Centre for Community Child Health Developmental health opportunity Age Current practice Ideal child-development trajectory At-risk child-development trajectory without intervention Opportunity

13 The ecology of child development

14 Economics of human capital

15 Return on investment in the early years Reference: Cunha et. al., 2006.

16 Impact of adversity early in life Hackman D, Farah M, Meaney M. Socio economic status and the brain: mechanistic insights from human and animal research. Neuroscience. Vol ;

17 Centre for Community Child Health The Adverse Childhood Events (ACE) Study (N=17,000) San Diego Kaiser adult patients Retrospective study of the relationship between morbidity patterns and adverse events in childhood, including Parental divorce Parental mental health Parental alcohol or drug abuse Physical/sexual abuse/neglect

18 Centre for Community Child Health If ACE score more than 4, then… Smokingx 2 Alcoholismx 7 Cancerx 2 Heart diseasex 2 Ch. lung diseasex 4 Attempted suicidex12* I/V drug use (men) x 46* * Compared to ACE score of 0

19 Why literacy matters

20 The Current Situation The Australian Context The Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey 2006 Ages: 15 to 74 years Domain:Level 1 / 2 (%) Level 3 (%) Level 4 / 5 (%) Prose Literacy Document Literacy Problem Solving Health Literacy 60356

21 Australia in the international context Prose and Document Literacy Scale 2006 Ages: 16 to 65 years Country:Level 1 / 2Level 3Level 4 / 5 Domain:Prose (%) Doc (%) Prose (%) Doc (%) Prose (%) Doc (%) Australia Norway Canada United States Italy

22

23 Language, literacy and social differences in Australia

24

25 AEDI Domain comparison – vulnerability by SEIFA N=261,000

26 Disadvantage begins early in life ….

27 69% of NT Indigenous children score below national minimum standard

28 Targeting low-ses students v. targeting low performing students Source: Masters (2009) using PISA data

29 Why data matter

30 Recognition of the problem Identification of the solution through policy Political imperative Kingdon J. Agendas, Alternatives and Public Policies. 2nd ed. New York: Harper Collins College Publishers, 1995 Creating sustainable policy: Data Evidence based policy Children on the policy agenda

31 Health and developmental inequalities in Australia: the results of the AEDI

32

33 About the AEDI

34 Centre for Community Child Health The AEDI is a relative population measure of how young children are developing in different Australian communities.

35 The AEDI looks at how groups of children are developing It gathers information on each child… and reports back on how groups of children are developing.

36 Centre for Community Child Health What is the aim of the AEDI? To measure the health and development of populations of young children to assist communities and governments to plan and assess the effectiveness of their efforts in supporting young children and their families.

37 What does the AEDI measure?

38 Centre for Community Child Health National implementation: National data collection from 1 May to 31 July 2009 Data collected by teachers through a secure web based data entry system Schools provided with funding of 1 hour for teacher training and 30 minutes per completed checklist Data analysed and reported based on where children live AEDI were re-run in small communities in 2010.

39 Centre for Community Child Health 2009 snapshot of Australias children: Total = 261,203 children (97.5% of estimated population) WA: 27,579 Queensland: 55,449 NSW: 87,168 Northern Territory: 3,255 SA: 16,208 Victoria: 61,196 ACT: 4,432 Tasmania: 5,916

40 National Numbers Data collected on 261, 203 children (97.5%). 15,528 teachers from 7,423 schools (95.6% of all schools) participated. Teacher feedback (86.4% of all teachers, n=13,815): 90.1% found AEDI easy to complete 63.9% thought AEDI will be beneficial to their work 74.8% felt the AEDI will assist their community to better understand the health and development of children in their area

41 Demographic information National Number of children surveyed261,203 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children 4.8% LBOTE (who speak languages other than or additional to English at home, or are reported by teachers to have ESL status) 18.0% Children with special needs status (chronic physical, intellectual and medical needs) 4.4% Children identified by teachers as requiring further assessment 10.5%

42 Key Findings Percentage of children developmentally vulnerable (DV) across Australia by jurisdiction DV on one or more domains (%) DV on two or more domains (%) Australia New South Wales Victoria Queensland Western Australia South Australia Tasmania Northern Territory Australian Capital Territory

43 Sub-population results

44 Socio-economic disadvantage

45 Australian Indigenous children and SEIFA: Percentage developmental vulnerability Green = Vulnerable on one or more domains Yellow = No vulnerability

46 Green = Vulnerable on one or more domains Yellow = No vulnerability Australian Indigenous children and SEIFA: Number developmentally vulnerable

47 Results: gender PhysicalSocialEmotionalLang/cogCommDV1DV2 POR Boys % CI Prevalence (%) Boys (124,682) Girls (122,550)

48 Results: gender PhysicalSocialEmotionalLang/cogCommDV1DV2 POR Boys % CI Prevalence (%) Boys (124,682) Girls (122,550)

49 Results: language diversity PhysicalSocialEmotionalLang/cogCommDV1DV2 POR Lang Diverse % CI Prevalence (%) Lang div-yes (44,656) Lang div-no (216,491)

50 Results: language diversity PhysicalSocialEmotionalLang/cogCommDV1DV2 POR Lang Diverse % CI Prevalence (%) Lang div-yes (44,656) Lang div-no (216,491)

51 Results: ATSI PhysicalSocialEmotionalLang/cogCommDV1DV2 POR ATSI % CI Prevalence (%) ATSI-yes (12,416) ATSI-no (248,731)

52 Results: ATSI PhysicalSocialEmotionalLang/cogCommDV1DV2 POR ATSI % CI Prevalence (%) ATSI-yes (12,416) ATSI-no (248,731)

53 Results: SES PhysicalSocialEmotionalLang/cogCommDV1DV2 POR Poorest areas % CI Prevalence (%) Poorest areas (57, 650) Richest areas (63,225)

54 Results PhysicalSocialEmotionalLang/cogCommDV1DV2 Boys Lang diversity ATSI Poorest areas Preschool


Download ppt "Emerging results from the AEDI: implications for Australia's children Associate Professor Sharon Goldfeld Paediatrician and Research Fellow Centre for."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google