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2013-2016 The purpose is to inform and communicate.

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Presentation on theme: "2013-2016 The purpose is to inform and communicate."— Presentation transcript:

1 The purpose is to inform and communicate

2 State Definition of AIG Students, Article 9B (N.C.G.S. § 115C-150.5) Academically or intellectually gifted (AIG) students perform or show the potential to perform at substantially high levels of accomplishment when compared with others of their age, experiences or environment.

3 State Definition of AIG Students, Article 9B (N.C.G.S. § 115C-150.5) Academically or intellectually gifted students exhibit high performance capability in intellectual areas, specific academic fields, or in both the intellectual areas and specific academic fields.

4 State Definition of AIG Students, Article 9B (N.C.G.S. § 115C-150.5) Academically or intellectually gifted students require differentiated educational services beyond those ordinarily provided by the regular educational program. Outstanding abilities are present in students from all cultural groups, across all economic strata, and in all areas of human endeavor.

5  In North Carolina, state legislation mandates that public schools identify and serve academically or intellectually gifted (AIG) K-12 students. Each LEA determines how to identify and serve its own AIG student population. This honors local context and supports each LEA to do what is best for its own AIG student population. LEAs must adhere to state legislation, which guides LEAs and defines academically or intellectually gifted students (see below), and also use the NC AIG Program Standards, adopted July 2009, as a guide in the development of local AIG programs. The SBE approved NC AIG Program Standards provides a statewide framework for quality programming, while honoring local context.

6  An LEA's policies and practices regarding its local AIG program are developed through the writing of a local AIG plan. This AIG plan is approved by the local board of education and submitted to State Board of Education/DPI for comment. DPI assists LEAs with their local AIG program and plan but does not approve local plans. Per state legislation, AIG plans must be revised every three years by the LEA. In , LEAs revised their local AIG plans and programs with the guidance of DPI. Current local AIG plans were revised and resubmitted in July 2013.

7  Student Identification  Differentiated Curriculum and Instruction  Personnel and Professional Development  Comprehensive Programming with a total school community  Partnerships with stakeholders in the program in planning and implementation of the AIG plan  Program accountability  With 51 practices

8  Maintain a practice  Focus on a practice

9  ACADEMICALLY OR INTELLECTUALLY GIFTED  CONTACT  Sneha Shah-Coltrane, Director, Gifted Education and Advanced Programs Sneha Shah-Coltrane  g/academicservices/gifted/

10  Dr. Lynn Warren – Director of Special Programs and Projects  Karen Foushee-Cameron District AIG Lead Teacher

11  4 th Grade: May Dell Floyd  5 th Grade: Angela Spurlin (Language Arts) Brandon Morehouse (Math) ** AIG Committee : Representatives from each grade level, an administrator, ESL, psychologist or guidance, AIG lead contact.

12  Revised Spring of 2013  AIG Advisory Council  Surveys to students, parents, and educators  Subcommittees: ◦ Parent Communication ◦ Review of the Lee County AIG Plan Reviewed by the Curriculum and Instruction Committee Board of Education adopted June 11, 2013

13  Lee County Schools Vision for local AIG program: County & Program MISSION STATEMENT Lee County Schools will teach students the social and academic skills needed to become responsible, productive citizens. The Lee County Schools Academically and/or Intellectually Gifted (AIG) Program will assist students to develop their talents and abilities to the fullest, to become life-long learners, and to be successful competitors in the twenty-first century, global society. VISION STATEMENT Lee County Schools, in partnership with the community, will provide challenging learning experiences for students in a safe and supportive environment. We are committed to excellence, social responsibility, and life-long learning. Our success will be demonstrated by the achievement of our students and their positive participation in society.

14  Begins with teachers observing students for gifted characteristics using the Teacher’s Observation of Potential in Students (TOPS) form  Categories include: Learns Easily Show Advanced Skills Displays Curiosity & Creativity Has Strong Interests Shows Advanced Reasoning & Problem Solving Displays Spatial Abilities Shows Motivation Shows Social Perceptiveness Displays Leadership

15 Primary Education Thinking Skills (PETS) Materials have been purchased for each grade level K-3. Begins with whole class activities to introduce the thinking skill. Then students are organized in flexible groups so that students may be nurtured in areas of strength as well as receive interventions in areas of need.

16  Primary Education Thinking Skills (PETS) is a systematic enrichment thinking skills program for 1 st and 2 nd grade students. Its purpose is to help primary aged students develop higher level thinking skills. PETS follow the taxonomy of thinking skills outlined by Benjamin Bloom, presenting lessons in analysis, synthesis, and evaluation.

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19  AIG Identification Criteria  Measuring Tool Score Points Weighting  Student Achievement  EOG 95 th -100 th Percentile 25 25%  88 th -94 th Percentile 20  80 th -87 Percentile 15   Student Aptitude  CogAT90 th -99 th Percentile2525%  *Use the Age Score %85 th -89 th Percentile20  80 th -84 th Percentile15   Student Performance  Grades %    *Use third quarter averages  Observable Student Behaviors  Renzulli AIG 9 very high %  Checklist of high  Displayed  Characteristics  Total 100%  Range to qualify  points. 

20  This is the identification criteria; however, identification is a process.

21 Scales for Rating the Behavioral Characteristics of Superior Students *Source: Renzulli, J., Smith, L., White, A., Callahan, C., Hartman, R (1976). Scales for Rating the Behavioral Characteristics of Superior Students. CT: Creative Learning Press.

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23  4 th & 5 th grade AIG cluster classes -Directly served in regular classrooms with formally identified students and grade level peers -Jacob’s Ladder materials created by The College of William & Mary -students will be taught Common Core in reading and math -students will be expected to work 1-2 years beyond grade level in the core areas of reading and mathematics

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25 Ladder ALadder BLadder C Sequencing Cause and Effect Consequences & Implications Details Classification Generalization Elements Inference Theme/Concept Jacob's Ladder Reading Comprehension Program Intended as a supplement to the William & Mary language arts units, Jacob's Ladder targets reading comprehension skills in high ability learners. In the form of three skill ladders connected to individual readings in poetry, myths/fables, and nonfiction, students move from lower order, concrete thinking skills to higher order, critical thinking skills. For example, Ladder A moves students from Sequencing to Cause and Effect to Consequences and Implications. These materials are now available from gifted education publisher, Prufrock Press.Prufrock Press

26  Describe how students are grouped-  4 th and 5 th Cluster-grouped by homeroom.  4 th Grade: AIG/Enrichment students will switch to Mrs. Floyd’s class from 8:15-11:30 to be served in math, reading/language arts.  5 th Grade: Mr. Morehouse and Mrs. Spurlin  Block to provide enriched instruction for AIG and high ability students.

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28  Learning Centers Learning centers have been found to be an appropriate way to provide content enrichment. These are usually designed as tabletop workstations for individual or group work. Students may self- select centers or be assigned to a center on a rotating basis. The center approach adapts well to the development of multiple intelligences. Although this is usually considered an elementary activity, it has been used effectively with middle school students. Learning centers may be located in regular classrooms, media centers, or resource rooms.

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30  Computer-Based Instruction/Telecommunications Computer- based instruction can be used both to enrich the curriculum and to remediate specific skill deficits. This is particularly appropriate for gifted students having specific skill gaps (e.g., gifted underachievers, learning disabled, culturally diverse, and credit accrual).

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32  Thematic Units Thematic units deal with information from various disciplines that is integrated under a broad based theme such as conflict, power, patterns, etc. Because it provides the opportunity to deal with content at a highly abstract level of sophistication, it is an appropriate way to modify curriculum for gifted students.

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34  Curriculum Compacting Curriculum compacting is modifying or streamlining the regular curriculum in order to eliminate repetition of previously mastered material, upgrade the challenge level of the regular curriculum, and provide time for appropriate enrichment and/or acceleration activities while ensuring mastery of basic skills. Curriculum compacting can be implemented at any grade level and with minimum additional funding. Teachers do require training and support during implementation. During compacted time, students may pursue activities in their classroom, media center, or special resource center.

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36  Mastery Learning Teachers design units of instruction with enrichment activities that students choose to pursue once they have demonstrated content mastery (85%) of the basic material. Reinforcement activities are also designed for students needing additional work or performing below mastery. The units are “learner based” but “teacher paced.” This allows teachers to appropriately pace the instruction for the entire class for an extended period of time (a marking period) and yet provide differentiation and an incentive for high performance. By “testing out”, students gain access to the enrichment activities. In a team situation, one teacher might take the “reinforcement group” and one the “enrichment group.” At the end of the unit, everyone begins again at the same place. In this way, enrichment and reinforcement groups remain flexible. This process is a district-wide option with the date of full implementation three to five years after initiation of plan.

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38  Differentiated Units One of the most effective ways to deliver differentiated curriculum to gifted students is through designing differentiated units that incorporate individual learning abilities and levels of content and skill. This instructional design has proved to be an effective planning tool and is appropriate for gifted students in regular classrooms, part-time classes, resource settings, and full-time placements.

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40  Tiered Assignments The teacher uses different levels of activities within a class to accommodate the needs and prior knowledge level of the student. Students may explore basically the same content but at different levels of complexity.

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42  Contracts Learning contracts are agreements made between teacher and student that allow the student to work independently on either accelerated or enriched materials related to a unit of study. To be effective, it is important that contract goals be realistic and that the teacher meet with the student on a regular basis and review progress.

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44  Independent Study This may be used as a way to either accelerate or enrich learning. Students displaying content mastery and having a special interest may contract with the teacher for an independent study project. This works best for students who are self-directed, who have strong interests, and who have a clear idea of what they would like to investigate. The teacher serves as a resource person and meets periodically with the student to assess progress. Independent study may also be used at the secondary level as a course in which students work independently and come together periodically to share experiences in a seminar.

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46  Reduction in Scores  Or  A Need for Differentiated Services

47 Each year the School AIG Team should review the progress of each student based on the performance assessment for the differentiated service options as outlined in the measurable objectives aligned with the core curriculum. Usually, annual reviews will occur at the end of the school year. However, reviews may be conducted as needs arise for intervention and IDEP consideration.

48 If a Differentiated Education Plan (DEP) is not meeting the needs of a student and a more specific individual plan is needed, an Individual Differentiated Education Plan (IDEP) should be developed to support student growth. The purpose of the Annual Review is not to re- evaluate the student by taking him/her through the entire identification process. If the student is performing satisfactorily, complete the AIG 17 Yearly Performance Review of Progress indicating services to be continued and notify parents.

49 The purpose of the Annual Review is not to re- evaluate the student by taking him/her through the entire identification process. If the student is performing satisfactorily, (80 % or higher on EOG, EOC, or grades) complete the AIG 17 Yearly Performance Review of Progress indicating services to be continued and notify parents. Sent home in the final report card.

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57  How are guidance counselors at elementary, middle, and high school informing gifted students about financing college?  Making a plan  Learning about different colleges and universities and about the programs they offer.  Matching interests to the college.

58  Survey results reflect that this is an area which needs to be improved.  Examples of how we will communicate with you:  Lee County Website  Teacher Web Pages  Class Dojo / Calendar  Weekly Newsletter (4 th )

59  PAGE sponsors the Lee County Spelling Bee.  This year the Lee County Spelling Bee will be in February.  PAGE is asking that each school have their school Spelling Bee before Christmas  If you would like more information about PAGE please sign up at the end of the meeting to be placed on a communication list.

60  Rising sixth graders  Two weeks in June  8:00 – 12:00 at one of the middle schools  Parents provide transportation  Optional Washington, D.C. trip

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62  Registration for camp is around $  If you are interested in your child going on the Washington, D.C. trip start saving now. The trip for June 2014 will be around $ if at least 70 students sign up for the trip.  More information will be provided for this year’s fifth graders in September.

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64  Service Options:  Learning Environment  ____ Enrichment  ____ Cluster Grouping  ____Math  ____ Reading  ____ Resource Class  ____Math  ____Reading  ____ Cross-Grade Grouping  _____Math  _____Reading  ____ Grade Acceleration  ____ Dual Enrollment  ____ Other (Please specify): _________________________________

65  Service Options:  Content Modification Learning Centers Computer-Based Instruction Thematic Units Curriculum Compacting Mastery Learning Differentiated Units Tiered Assignments Contracts Independent Investigations Individualized Differentiated Education Plan (IDEP) Other (Please specify):

66  At this time Or  At an individual parent conference

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68  Additional slides follow which you may or may not decide to use.

69  All teachers will be given the Renzulli checklist.  The checklist is to be completed over time.  What are the opportunities within your classroom for the student to demonstrate these behavior?

70  CogAT scores - Use the Age Score %  You will not use or enter the Composite score.  Enter scores for Verbal, Quantitative, and Non- verbal scores even if the score is below the criteria cut off score.  For math, during the decision making stage, you will use the higher of the two - Quantitative or Non-verbal.  Invite all third and fifth grade teachers to the AIG Team meeting to analyze the data and discuss the students.  Is there a student who should be added to the pool?

71  The averages for the first three quarters for reading and math for all of the students who are in the pool or for any students who you think should be considered for the AIG program.  Complete and enter the Renzulli checklist for all students who are in the pool.  Analyze the data and discuss the students.  Is there a student who should be added to the pool?

72  Enter the End-of-Grade % for math and reading.  Analyze the data and make a final decision for each student in the pool.  Complete the AIG 11 database and a copy of the file to Dr. Warren, one to your principal, and one to your NCWISE operator.

73  Use AIG 17 Year Performance Review of Progress (Annual Review)  Send home a copy in the final report card.

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75 “Selection of students for special programs should be based on a relatively equivalent balance of tests and non-test based information.” Joseph Renzulli

76  “The ultimate test of any identification system is the degree to which it has successfully identified students who can and do profit from and succeed in the educational programs that are provided.” Joseph Renzulli

77 “Some young people show their potential at certain times and under certain circumstances.” Joseph Renzulli  page vii of the manual

78 Gifted behaviors can be found "in certain people (not all people), at certain times (not all the time), and under certain circumstances (not all circumstances).“ Joseph Renzulli Gifted behaviors can be found "in certain people (not all people), at certain times (not all the time), and under certain circumstances (not all circumstances).“ Joseph Renzulli

79 Observation is useful in recognizing children with high potential who are :  Culturally or linguistically diverse  Economically disadvantage  Twice exceptional

80  Over multiple time periods  Natural learning environments  Across settings  Across tasks  U-STARS pages 2-3

81  High Energy  Intellectual Curiosity  Creative, original, and inventive  Good memory, ability to retain information  Perfectionist  Concern with moral issues and fairness  Analytical and critical thinker  Rapid learner  Sensitivity  Keen sense of humor

82  Learning or Cognition – Behaviors that reflect an individual’s ability to perceive and acquire knowledge  Creativity – Behaviors that reflect an individual’s ability to produce original, novel, and unique ideas or products  Motivation – Behaviors that reflect an individual’s ability to bring energy to bear on problems to task  Leadership – Behaviors that reflect an individual’s ability to guide or direct actions by other students  page 7

83 What are the opportunities within your classroom for the student to demonstrate these behavior?.

84  What are the opportunities within your classroom for the student to demonstrate these behaviors?  1. You have not observed these behaviors.  2. You have occasionally observed these behaviors.  3. You have usually observed these behaviors.  4. You almost always or always have observed these behaviors.

85 1. Often offers unusual and unique responses to problems and questions. Puts unrelated ideas together in new and different ways. 2.Is a high-risk taker; is adventurous and speculative. Possesses a “let’s try” approach in play. 3.May be non-conforming. Accepts disorder, is not interested in details; is individualistic; does not fear being different. This could be viewed as a positive or a negative. 4.Displays a keen sense of humor. May be the class clown. 5.Demonstrates exceptional ability in written expression; creates stories, plays, etc. How would this look in a math class? 6.Generates a large number of ideas or solutions to problems and questions. 7.Enjoys exploring materials and invents new ways to work with common materials. (Is imaginative in associating ideas with materials.) Science activities or consider drawings 8.Can make use of his knowledge of both cultural systems to influence outcomes to this advantage. 9.Shows interest in learning more about cultural background and/or in relating his cultural experiences to social and scientific phenomena explanations presented in the classroom. Creativity Characteristics Creativity – Behaviors that reflect an individual’s ability to produce original, novel, and unique ideas or products

86 1.Becomes absorbed and truly involved in certain self-selected tasks. (It is sometimes difficult to get him/her to move to another topic or to stop a task). 2.Is independent and self-sufficient. Requires little direction from others. (May resist directions.) 3.Is self-critical; not easily satisfied with own speed or products. (Sometimes is critical of others.) This could be seen as a positive or negative. 4.Is easily bored with routine tasks. Requires little drill to grasp concepts. (Needs to know reason for activity.) This could be seen as a positive or negative. 5.Is able to concentrate for a longer period of time than other children of same age. 6.Is quite concerned with right and wrong, good and bad. Can be argumentative. 7.Often is self-assertive. (Can be stubbornly set in ideas.) 8.Is consistently productive. Takes advantage of opportunities to learn. 9.Enjoys the challenge of new and difficult activities. 10.Is interested in many adult problems. World problems - environment, fairness, tsunami, earthquake, politics Motivational Characteristics LEP population operates in two worlds. Other students from different groups may also. Motivation – Behaviors that reflect an individual’s ability to bring energy to bear on problems to task

87 1.Has an advanced vocabulary for age; expresses himself/herself well. (Can put stories in his/her own words.) (Talks in conversational manner; listens and responds appropriately.) 2.Is curious about many activities and places outside immediate environment and experience. 3.Tries to discover the how and why of things; wants to know what makes things work; takes things apart. Think about your science lessons. 4.Is a keen and alert observer. Pays unusual attention to detail. Usually “sees more” or “gets more” out of a story, activity, etc. than others. (Spots details other children miss.) Discussions in reading groups or in class. 5.Reasons things out for self; sees logical and common answers. Recognizes relationships. Makes connections. 6.Shows a preference for more difficult materials; atlases, encyclopedias, etc. Examines pictures in books and magazines to learn about things (even when he/she cannot read the material). Technology or electronic media 7.Has quick recall of factual information. 8.Asks many provocative questions about topics in which young children do not ordinarily have an interest. Generates questions of his/her own. Discussion groups Math groups 9.Uses words in unique ways to express feelings, observations, and knowledge. 10.Has advanced number concepts and understands relationships among and between various coins. Understands function of clocks, calendars, etc. 11.Possesses lots of information about a variety of topics (beyond the usual interests of youngsters his age For example in brainstorming, expressed interest in reading selections. Or in casual conversations with the student. Learning Characteristics Learning or Cognition – Behaviors that reflect an individual’s ability to perceive and acquire knowledge

88 1.Accepts and carries responsibility well; can be counted on to do what he/she promises and usually does it well. 2.Adapts readily to new situations; is flexible in thought and action and does not seem disturbed when normal routine is changed. (exceptions such as LD or Asperger's Syndrome) 3.Is self-confident with children of own age as well as with adults. Frequently assumes a leadership role. 4.Can express self well; has good verbal faculty and is usually well understood. Class presentations. 5.Is cooperative; tends to avoid bickering and is generally easy to get along with. 6.Tends to dominate others; generally directs the activity in which he/she is involved. (May be seen as “bossy” by other children.) 7.Organizes material in a way that is meaningful. 8.Expresses little fear of the unknown or of the difficulty of a task. 9.Likes to organize and brings structure to things, people, and situations. 10.Is able to predict from present information. Invents new ways to work with common materials. Leadership Characteristics What opportunities whether small group or whole class are available. ? Leadership – Behaviors that reflect an individual’s ability to guide or direct actions by other students.

89 11. Volunteers new information and ideas or presents new information about cultural differences or similarities or about materials learned outside of class. 12. Is able to function successfully in both cultures, or culturally relevant activities of both cultures(i.e. help children who are less acculturated to understand other culture’s values, etc.) Think about the culture of your classroom- there is diversity there Home vs. school culture. 13. Is able to generalize/transfer culture-specific skills, notions or concepts between cultures Respecting a person who may not celebrate Christmas or Halloween. Leadership Characteristics

90  This is the identification criteria; however, identification is a process.

91 I Am Gifted &title=I_am_Gifted&ref=Rebelhunter47

92  “Once the child is admitted, performance is always more important than the entry criterion or score. ”  page 25

93 Common Characteristics  Highly motivated  Advanced communication skills  Well-developed memory  Insightful  Imaginative and Creative  Advanced ability to deal with symbols  Advanced and intense interests  Advanced problem solving abilities  Inquisitive  Advanced reasoning capabilities  Keen sense of humor Challenging Characteristics  Heightened sensitivity  Preoccupied with a need to understand  Perfectionism  Asynchronous (uneven) development  Emotional intensity  Early awareness of being different  Anxiety caused by advanced knowledge  Need for mental stimulation  Nonconformity  Questioning of authority  Overexcitability  Introversion From: Methods and materials for teaching the gifted by Karnes & Bean, 2001, Prufrock Press. 

94 Neihart, M. Gifted Child Quarterly National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) Vo. 44, No. 4, pp Fall 2000 This article by Maureen Niehart suggests approaches for the teacher who works with young people with Asperger's Syndrome. AS is a disorder in the autism spectrum that is observed in some gifted children. Gifted children may be very difficult to diagnose with AS because the disorder may resemble other problems such as a learning disability or simply just similar traits of a gifted child. Common traits of gifted AS children are listed and compared to children who are gifted without AS in order to help identify these individuals. ABSTRACT Asperger's Syndrome is a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by deficits in social communication and by repetitive patterns of behaviors, or interests. It is observed in some gifted children. The author proposes that gifted children with Asperger's Syndrome may not be identified because their unusual behaviors may be wrongly attributed to either their giftedness or to a learning disability. The article discusses ways in which Asperger's Syndrome might be missed in gifted children and proposes guidelines for differentiating characteristics of giftedness from characteristics of Asperger's Syndrome. Gifted children with Asperger's Syndrome

95 Differentiating CharacteristicOrdinary GiftedGifted with Asperger's Syndrome Speech PatternsNormal, but may have language of older child Pedantic, seamless speech Response to RoutinesMay passively resist, but will often go along Very low tolerance for change, agitation, aggression Disturbance of AttentionIf disturbance exists, it is usually externalDisturbance is internal HumorEngages in socially reciprocal humorCan do word play, but typically doesn't understand humor that requires social reciprocity Motor ClumsinessNot characteristic of most gifted children50-90 % of Asperger children manifest Inappropriate AffectNot a characteristicNearly always observed InsightInsight usually goodUsually remarkably absent StereotypyNot a characteristicMay be present Table 1 Proposed Characteristics to Differentiate Ordinary Gifted Children from Gifted Children with Asperger's Syndrome

96 Identifying Gifted Children with Asperger's Syndrome It is imperative that gifted children with AS be diagnosed so that they can effectively secure appropriate services. Parents and teachers may agree that "something is wrong," but not know what. Identifying these students only as gifted or learning disabled is not as effective and can contribute not only to misunderstandings about the true nature of the child's difficulties, but also to the formulation of an inappropriate educational plan (Barron & Barron, 1992; Dewey, 1991; Grandin, 1992; Klin & Volkmar, 1995; Levy, 1988; Minshew, 1992; Schopler, 1985). To identify AS in gifted children, two things are needed: a thorough developmental history and insight into the motivation behind certain behaviors (Atwood, 1998; Levy, 1988; Tsai, 1992). Without these two, there is a danger that AS will be over--or under--diagnosed. Symptoms of the disorder in a gifted child may be mistakenly attributed to the child's giftedness, rather than to the disorder. At other times, an AS child's giftedness may be discounted or considered irrelevant to his or her development. Accurate diagnosis of AS in gifted children requires the participation of an experienced, interdisciplinary team. Parents should be actively involved in the assessment since developmental history is so important to confirming or ruling out the diagnosis. Table 2 provides the diagnostic criteria for AS from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; APA, 1994). Tony Atwood (1998) explained that, in addition to the developmental history, a diagnostic evaluation will usually include some formal testing, an assessment of movement skills, observations of the child's social reciprocity in situations engineered to elicit a variety of specific behaviors, and observations of the child's pragmatic use of language. Readers interested in a more comprehensive discussion of diagnostic tools and procedures are referred to his work.

97 Gifted ChildrenHigh Achievers Highly curiousKnows the answers Has wild, crazy ideasHas good ideas Plays around, yet can test wellWorks hard to achieve high scores Detail orientedAnswers the questions 1-2 repetitions for mastery6-8 repetitions for mastery Prefers older children or adultsEnjoys peers Makes inferencesGrasps the meaning Extremely intenseReceptive and willing Creates new designsCopies information accurately Manipulates informationAbsorbs information Excellent guesserExcellent memorizing skills Likes complexityEnjoys sequential information Is keenly observantAlert and on-task Highly self-criticalPleased with own efforts Asks the hard questionsKnows all the answers Works beyond the groupWorks in the top group Enjoys learning new thingsEnjoys school Rebels against routineEnjoys routine Becomes the class clownConforms to accepted behavior Read more:

98  In what ways do you provide opportunities for students to demonstrate the characteristics? 

99  Consideration 1: There is no such thing as a perfect identification system.  Consideration 2: The objective data vs. subjective date trade-off.  Consideration 3: People, Not instruments, make decisions.  Consideration 4: Avoid the multiple-criteria screening smokescreen  Consideration 5: What will we call selected students?  Consideration 6: The relationship between identification and programming.

100 Please complete the following checklist by numbering what best represents your observations of the student. Use the rubric listed below to determine your rating: 1. You have not observed these behaviors. 2. You have occasionally observed these behaviors 3. You have usually observed these behaviors. 4. You almost always or always have observed these behaviors

101  1. Often offers unusual and unique responses to problems and questions. Puts unrelated ideas together in new and different ways.  2. Is a high-risk taker; is adventurous and speculative. Possesses a “let’s try” approach in play.  3. May be non-conforming. Accepts disorder, is not interested in details; is individualistic; does not fear being different.  4. Displays a keen sense of humor.  5. Demonstrates exceptional ability in written expression; creates stories, plays, etc. Math Class?? Creativity Characteristics

102  6. Generates a large number of ideas or solutions to problems and questions.  7. Enjoys exploring materials and invents new ways to work with common materials. (Is imaginative in associating ideas with materials.)  8. Can make use of his knowledge of both cultural systems to influence outcomes to this advantage.  9. Shows interest in learning more about cultural background and/or in relating his cultural experiences to social and scientific phenomena explanations presented in the classroom. Creativity Characteristics

103  1. Becomes absorbed and truly involved in certain self-selected tasks. (It is sometimes difficult to get him/her to move to another topic or to stop a task).  2. Is independent and self-sufficient. Requires little direction from others. (May resist directions.)  3. Is self-critical; not easily satisfied with own speed or products. (Sometimes is critical of others.)  4. Is easily bored with routine tasks. Requires little drill to grasp concepts. (Needs to know reason for activity.)  5. Is able to concentrate for a longer period of time than other children of same age.

104  6. Is quite concerned with right and wrong, good and bad.  7. Often is self-assertive. (Can be stubbornly set in ideas.)  8. Is consistently productive. Takes advantage of opportunities to learn.  9. Enjoys the challenge of new and difficult activities.  10. Is interested in many adult problems. World problems environment, fairness

105  1. Has an advanced vocabulary for age; expresses himself/herself well. (Can put stories in his/her own words.) (Talks in conversational manner; listens and responds appropriately.)  2. Is curious about many activities and places outside immediate environment and experience.  3. Tries to discover the how and why of things; wants to know what makes things work; takes things apart.  4. Is a keen and alert observer. Pays unusual attention to detail. Usually “sees more” or “gets more” out of a story, activity, etc. than others. (Spots details other children miss.)  5. Reasons things out for self; sees logical and common answers. Recognizes relationships.

106  6. Shows a preference for more difficult materials; atlases, encyclopedias, etc. Examines pictures in books and magazines to learn about things (even when he/she cannot read the material).  7. Has quick recall of factual information.  8. Asks many provocative questions about topics in which young children do not ordinarily have an interest. Generates questions of his/her own. Discussion groups. Math????  9. Uses words in unique ways to express feelings, observations, and knowledge.  10. Has advanced number concepts and understands relationships among and between various coins. Understands function of clocks, calendars, etc.  11. Possesses lots of information about a variety of topics (beyond the usual interests of youngsters his age

107  1. Accepts and carries responsibility well; can be counted on to do what he/she promises and usually does it well.  2. Adapts readily to new situations; is flexible in thought and action and does not seem disturbed when normal routine is changed.  3. Is self-confident with children of own age as well as with adults. Frequently assumes a leadership role.  4. Can express self well; has good verbal faculty and is usually well understood.  5. Is cooperative; tends to avoid bickering and is generally easy to get along with.  6. Tends to dominate others; generally directs the activity in which he/she is involved. (May be seen as “bossy” by other children.)

108  7. Organizes material in a way that is meaningful.  8. Expresses little fear of the unknown or of the difficulty of a task.  9. Likes to organize and brings structure to things, people, and situations.  10. Is able to predict from present information. Invents new ways to work with common materials.  11. Volunteers new information and ideas or presents new information about cultural differences or similarities or about materials learned outside of class.


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