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MMC 2100 Thursday February 23, 2012. Chapter 9: Writing for Broadcast Learning objectives: Learning objectives: –Differences in broadcast writing vs.

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Presentation on theme: "MMC 2100 Thursday February 23, 2012. Chapter 9: Writing for Broadcast Learning objectives: Learning objectives: –Differences in broadcast writing vs."— Presentation transcript:

1 MMC 2100 Thursday February 23, 2012

2 Chapter 9: Writing for Broadcast Learning objectives: Learning objectives: –Differences in broadcast writing vs. print writing –Characteristics of broadcast writing –Broadcast writing criteria

3 Chapter 9: Writing for Broadcast Most dominant media Most dominant media –More than 6,000 TV/radio stations –1,700 newspapers

4 Broadcasting is pervasive Broadcasting is pervasive Immediacy and impact Immediacy and impact Adaptability is required Adaptability is required Writing is essential Writing is essential

5 Chapter 9: Writing for Broadcast How broadcast writing different from print writing How broadcast writing different from print writing –Timeliness: constant updates Need to know latest news on event Need to know latest news on event –Inform, not explain Maximum length: 2 minutes Maximum length: 2 minutes Average length: 20-30 seconds Average length: 20-30 seconds –Audio/visual impact: story selection based on audio/visual availability Do we use that criteria when selecting print story? Do we use that criteria when selecting print story?

6 Chapter 9: Writing for Broadcast Characteristics of broadcast writing Characteristics of broadcast writing –Correctness: accuracy –Clarity: be clear about what saying Keep sentence structure basic Keep sentence structure basic –Avoid pronouns –Keep subject-verb structure –Concise: use fewer words to say what you mean No time element– everything is fresh No time element– everything is fresh Decrease adjectives & adverbs use Decrease adjectives & adverbs use Use active voice Use active voice –Color: Put a human face on story –allow viewer to visualize story

7 Chapter 9: Writing for Broadcast Broadcast writing story structure Broadcast writing story structure –Dramatic unity Climax: lead or nut graph Climax: lead or nut graph –What happened Cause: why it happened Cause: why it happened Effect: analysis of what happened Effect: analysis of what happened –So-what factor

8 The main point of broadcast copy preparation is to make it easy for the news reader (anchor, on-air reporter) to read the copy The main point of broadcast copy preparation is to make it easy for the news reader (anchor, on-air reporter) to read the copy

9 Chapter 9: Writing for Broadcast Broadcast writing story structure cont. Broadcast writing story structure cont. –Must write to EXACT time specifications: cant go over or under Average read: 150 words/minute Average read: 150 words/minute Have to omit certain facts Have to omit certain facts –Pull listener immediately into story –Dont tell entire story immediately

10 One story per page One story per page Use caps and lowercase Use caps and lowercase Dont carry a paragraph over to another page Dont carry a paragraph over to another page Dont hyphenate Dont hyphenate

11 Chapter 9: Writing for Broadcast Broadcast writing style Broadcast writing style –Titles before names –No abbreviations –Avoid direct quotes (paraphrase instead) Dont use quote marks – Dont use quote marks – –say QUOTE THIS IS A TERRIBLE DAY UNQUOTE –Attribution BEFORE quote Listener should know who is speaking before quote Listener should know who is speaking before quote –Minimal punctuation –Round off numbers & stats One-nine: spell out One-nine: spell out 10-999: use numerals 10-999: use numerals Use combo of numerals and spell out for large mixed numbers Use combo of numerals and spell out for large mixed numbers –15-billion Say one million NOT a million Say one million NOT a million

12 Chapter 9: Writing for Broadcast Broadcast writing style cont. Broadcast writing style cont. –Avoid extended descriptions –Dont use symbols: spell out Four dollars Four dollars Three dollars and eighty five cents Three dollars and eighty five cents –Use phonetics for difficult names Pronounce names correctly Pronounce names correctly –Avoid pronouns & appositive phrases Keep S/V together Keep S/V together –Use present tense when possible –Avoid dependent clauses Use simple sentences: S/V/O Use simple sentences: S/V/O

13 Chapter 9: Writing for Broadcast Broadcast script #5 Broadcast script #5 Due: In Lab 8 next week Due: In Lab 8 next week Approximately 600 words (six stories of 100 words each) – from textbook (pgs. 196-199) under 9.6/9.7 Newscast section Approximately 600 words (six stories of 100 words each) – from textbook (pgs. 196-199) under 9.6/9.7 Newscast section Four-minute script Four-minute script Typed, double-spaced Typed, double-spaced DONT put stories on same page; include –30– at end of each story DONT put stories on same page; include –30– at end of each story –Dont split stories onto another page –This will be your script to read, so make sure you can read – this will also be what you turn in to your lab instructor


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