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TV, Radio and the Internet. TV and Radio The broadcasting media must, by law, avoid bias of any sort and give everyone a fair hearing. Organisations and.

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Presentation on theme: "TV, Radio and the Internet. TV and Radio The broadcasting media must, by law, avoid bias of any sort and give everyone a fair hearing. Organisations and."— Presentation transcript:

1 TV, Radio and the Internet

2 TV and Radio The broadcasting media must, by law, avoid bias of any sort and give everyone a fair hearing. Organisations and individuals can complain to groups such as the Broadcasting Standards Commission if they feel they have been portrayed in an unfair way. Political parties complain the most.

3 They employ monitors who measure the amount of air time they get on TV or radio and look at whether the coverage is positive or negative. The political party in power gets more attention than the opposition parties. This also means that the party in power will be subject to greater scrutiny.

4 With regards to Party Political Broadcasts – each party get the same amount of air time on TV and radio so it is fair. They also get the same slots (prime time etc) I.e. in between shows such as Corrie and Eastenders when viewing figures are at their highest.

5 The Internet The Internet is a growing part of the media. It is now a significant source from which many people access the daily news. The Internet is therefore a very important medium for the Scottish Parliament.

6 The Scottish Parliaments website is a good example of the openness and accessibility of the Parliament. The best way to find out about how the website can influence decision making in the Parliament is to spend some time surfing through its many sections. Here are a few things to look out for:

7 You can your MSP or First Minister direct. E-petitions are well worth studying. Find out what the current e-petitions are. The petitions section is an excellent example of how the internet can influence decision making in the parliament. Ordinary people can start an e-petition and it can get discussed in parliament and get a law changed or implemented.

8 Current business tells you what is to be discussed and debated that week. Holyrood TV and see both archive materials and live sessions from the chamber and committee rooms. Find out about your MSPs. You can even watch a short video of them online. People can look at all this and


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