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To Build a Fire Short Story by Jack London Introducing the Short Story with Literary Analysis: Setting and Conflict Reading Strategy: Predict Vocabulary.

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Presentation on theme: "To Build a Fire Short Story by Jack London Introducing the Short Story with Literary Analysis: Setting and Conflict Reading Strategy: Predict Vocabulary."— Presentation transcript:

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2 To Build a Fire Short Story by Jack London Introducing the Short Story with Literary Analysis: Setting and Conflict Reading Strategy: Predict Vocabulary in Context VIDEO TRAILER

3 To Build a Fire INTRODUCING THE SHORT STORY Should you trust your INSTINCTS? An instinct is unlearned, automatic behavior shown by all members of a species, such as birds building a nest.

4 To Build a Fire INTRODUCING THE SHORT STORY Should you trust your INSTINCTS? Do people, like animals, have instincts? If they do, when are they likely to use them? Are a person’s instincts as good as, say, a dog’s?

5 To Build a Fire INTRODUCING THE SHORT STORY The story “To Build a Fire” attempts to answer such questions. Should you trust your INSTINCTS?

6 To Build a Fire Click on the title to play the trailer. To Build a Fire

7 Setting and Conflict In some stories, the setting can create the conflict a character faces. It can even act as the antagonist, or opponent, of the main character.

8 To Build a Fire In “To Build a Fire,” the setting is the Yukon wilderness, and the main character must battle the crippling cold to survive. The setting challenges him in other ways as well. As you read, notice details about this harsh setting and think about the choices the setting forces the character to make. Setting and Conflict

9 To Build a Fire Predict Predicting helps you become actively involved in what you are reading and gives you reasons to read on. When you predict, you use text clues to guess what will happen next in a story.

10 To Build a Fire To make sound predictions about what will happen in “To Build a Fire,” use the following strategies: Think about the personality, actions, and thoughts of the main character when predicting how he will respond to his situation. Note passages of foreshadowing, or hints and clues about future plot events. Predict

11 To Build a Fire As you read, jot down at least three predictions and the clues you used to make them. Use a chart like the one shown. The man will... Predictions Text Clues Predict

12 To Build a Fire Jack London uses the vocabulary words in the box on the right in his suspenseful tale. To see how many vocabulary words you know, substitute a different word or phrase for each vocabulary term. Sample answers appear in brackets. apprehension conflagration conjectural imperative intangible peremptorily reiterate smite [strike, attack] [fear and worry] [repeat] [involving guesswork] 1. intangible fear [cannot be defined] 5. smite in anger 2. conjectural answer 3. baseless apprehension 4. reiterate the command [urgent] 6. imperative action [large, destructive fire] 7. forest conflagration [in a commanding way] 8. peremptorily dismiss

13 To Build a Fire apprehension n. fear and worry for the future conflagration n. a large, destructive fire conjectural adj. involving guesswork imperative adj. urgently necessary intangible adj. unable to be perceived with the senses

14 To Build a Fire reiterate v. to repeat smite v. to inflict a heavy blow on; past tense—smote peremptorily adv. in a commanding way that does not allow for refusal or contradiction


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