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Senior Years ICT Manitoba Curriculum Framework of Outcomes Darryl Gervais.

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Presentation on theme: "Senior Years ICT Manitoba Curriculum Framework of Outcomes Darryl Gervais."— Presentation transcript:

1 Senior Years ICT Manitoba Curriculum Framework of Outcomes Darryl Gervais

2 Education, Citizenship and Youth Information and Communication Technology Students learning to –solve problems –accomplish tasks –express creativity

3 Education, Citizenship and Youth Why is there a new framework? Existing curriculum was old Large number of ICT SIC’s SY teachers were asking for outcomes Literacy with ICT Across the Curriculum

4 Education, Citizenship and Youth Previous Curriculum - Computer 1983 - Computer Science 205 1984 - Computer Science 305 1991 - Computer Applications and Technology 105

5 Education, Citizenship and Youth Previous Curriculum - Business 1993 Introductory Keyboarding 15G Advanced Keyboarding 25G Software Applications 30S Word Processing 30G Advanced Word Processing 45S

6 Education, Citizenship and Youth School Initiated Courses Additional work for school staff Differences between schools Trends across school divisions Reflect local needs

7 Education, Citizenship and Youth Literacy with ICT http://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/tech/lict/index.html

8 Education, Citizenship and Youth Literacy with ICT all K-8 students will develop their literacy with ICT all K-8 teachers will provide opportunities for their students to develop literacy with ICT across the curriculum all schools will report to parents about the development of their child’s literacy with ICT

9 Education, Citizenship and Youth Literacy with ICT Choosing and using ICT responsibly and ethically, to support critical and creative thinking about information and about communication as citizens of the global community

10 Education, Citizenship and Youth Literacy with ICT Competencies demonstrating critical thinking demonstrating creative thinking demonstrating ethics and responsibility

11 Education, Citizenship and Youth Literacy with ICT Big Ideas Plan and Question Gather and Make Sense Produce to Show Understanding Communicate Reflect Ethics and Responsibility Social Implications Collaboration Motivation and Confidence

12 Education, Citizenship and Youth Learning Continuum A developmental learning continuum is an assessment tool FOR learning based on teacher observation. It describes what teachers see and hear students doing as they demonstrate their literacy continuum FOR

13 Education, Citizenship and Youth K – 8 Timeline Continuum Development 2004/5 - 16 teachers Action Research 2005/6 - 200 + teachers and school leaders Implementation All 37 school divisions, reporting to parents 2006/7 - 15% teachers targeted 2007/8 – 70% teachers targeted 2008/9 – 100% teachers targeted

14 Education, Citizenship and Youth Literacy with ICT vs. ICT Literacy Literacy with ICT ICT Literacy

15 Education, Citizenship and Youth Literacy with ICT vs. Computer Use Literacy with ICT ICT Literacy Essential Skills Computer Use

16 Education, Citizenship and Youth HRSDC Computer Use Complexity Scale Level 1Level 2Level 3Level 4Level 5 Basic interaction with computer-controlled equipment Limited to a few basic commands with no knowledge of software required Limited number of steps that can be memorized as a sequence No variation in computer use task from one instance to the other Use of several, familiar software features such as the simple formatting of text or a one- dimensional search of a database Software used for a limited number of functions; data entry into pre-existing structures; conversion of files from one format to another; production of letters and memos in standard formats. Software is set up by someone else and used with ‘default’ values Multiple operations, use of a wide range of software features or options User may be largely responsible for setting-up the software, customizing the interface, and configuring the software and hardware as required Work may be automated by the creation and/or use of macros, templates or scripts Varied, may involve experimentation and problem-solving Complex tasks, may require selecting most appropriate software for the work Multiple operations, extensive use of software functions and features Integrated use of several software packages Manage an existing network. Add/modify user accounts; perform routine maintenance and system management User may need to access little-used features and options of the software Assessment of information technology needs, selection of appropriate computing and software solutions, and the evaluation of outcomes Tasks which require the expert knowledge of computer software and information technology systems needed to design, write and customize computer programs for specific purposes

17 Education, Citizenship and Youth Computer Use Complexity Scale Level 1Level 2Level 3Level 4Level 5 Basic interaction with computer-controlled equipment Limited to a few basic commands with no knowledge of software required Limited number of steps that can be memorized as a sequence No variation in computer use task from one instance to the other Use of several, familiar software features such as the simple formatting of text or a one- dimensional search of a database Software used for a limited number of functions; data entry into pre-existing structures; conversion of files from one format to another; production of letters and memos in standard formats. Software is set up by someone else and used with ‘default’ values Multiple operations, use of a wide range of software features or options User may be largely responsible for setting-up the software, customizing the interface, and configuring the software and hardware as required Work may be automated by the creation and/or use of macros, templates or scripts Varied, may involve experimentation and problem-solving Complex tasks, may require selecting most appropriate software for the work Multiple operations, extensive use of software functions and features Integrated use of several software packages Manage an existing network. Add/modify user accounts; perform routine maintenance and system management User may need to access little-used features and options of the software Assessment of information technology needs, selection of appropriate computing and software solutions, and the evaluation of outcomes Tasks which require the expert knowledge of computer software and information technology systems needed to design, write and customize computer programs for specific purposes Supporting Skills Literacy with ICT Computer Science SY ICT Courses HRSDC Computer Use Complexity Scale

18 Education, Citizenship and Youth Infusion of ICT research in the last 20 years has shown that the most effective way to develop literacy with ICT is to use models that focus on learning rather than on technology the pedagogy of Literacy with ICT encourages movement from technology as supplementary to the curriculum to a model that infuses the curriculum with ICT

19 Education, Citizenship and Youth Supplementary Teaching and Learning ICT

20 Education, Citizenship and Youth Supplementary Teaching and Learning ICT

21 Education, Citizenship and Youth Complementary Teaching and Learning ICT

22 Education, Citizenship and Youth Complementary Teaching and Learning ICT

23 Education, Citizenship and Youth Teaching and Learning Integrated ICT

24 Education, Citizenship and Youth Teaching and Learning Integrated ICT

25 Education, Citizenship and Youth Infused Teaching and Learning

26 Education, Citizenship and Youth Senior Years Infusion In the workplace, ICT is infused throughout the activities of the organization. Using ICT is not a task separate from all other work. In Senior Years, ICT needs to be infused across the curriculum. Senior Years ICT courses support the infusion of ICT across the Senior Years curriculum.

27 Education, Citizenship and Youth supplementarycomplementaryintegrated infused ICT learning

28 Education, Citizenship and Youth Challenges Professional Development for Teachers –Personal ICT Literacy/Computer Use –Personal Literacy with ICT –Assisting students to become Literate with ICT Professional Development for School Leaders –Personal ICT Literacy/Computer Use –Personal Literacy with ICT –Assisting teachers Informing and Educating Parents

29 Education, Citizenship and Youth Solutions Workshops about ICT School Divisions Teacher Special Area Groups Microsoft Teacher Mentor Program Support for Teaching Literacy with ICT Implementation teams in every school division Peer Coaching Online information Information for Parents Online Print

30 Education, Citizenship and Youth Funding of Schools 2007/2008 Professional Development Support, $1.3M The greater of –$10 per eligible pupil in K-8 and –$15,000 per division To assist with the training of teachers to incorporate ICT and report student outcomes to parents

31 Education, Citizenship and Youth New ICT Courses Reinforce and extend the ICT knowledge, skills and attitudes developed in K – 8 Support learning in all courses Explore interests

32 Education, Citizenship and Youth Senior Years Curriculum infused with ICT Senior Years ICT Courses School Initiated Courses Technical Vocational Courses K - 8 9 - 12

33 Education, Citizenship and Youth New ICT Courses Applying ICT 1 & 2 Keyboarding Print Communications Digital Pictures Digital Film Making Desktop Publishing Web Design Interactive Websites Data Collection and Analysis Relational Databases 2D Animation 3D Modeling Broadcast Media Interactive Media Computer Science

34 Education, Citizenship and Youth Applying ICT 1 & 2 (15F) Reinforce and extend the ICT knowledge, attitudes, and skills that they have developed in K-8, and prepare them for further studies in ICT

35 Education, Citizenship and Youth Keyboarding (25S) Use touch-keying techniques to improve accuracy and speed with a keyboard

36 Education, Citizenship and Youth Print Communications (25S) Plan and create documents for personal and business communications

37 Education, Citizenship and Youth Digital Pictures (25S) Convey a message through an original digital image

38 Education, Citizenship and Youth Digital Film Making (25S) Tell stories by combining sound, still images, moving images, text, graphics, and animation into a video product

39 Education, Citizenship and Youth Desktop Publishing (35S) Plan and create published print documents

40 Education, Citizenship and Youth Web Design (35S) Design, develop, and publish a simple website

41 Education, Citizenship and Youth Interactive Websites (35S) Design, develop, and publish a website to display and gather data

42 Education, Citizenship and Youth Data Collection and Analysis (35S) Collect, organize, manipulate and analyze data to solve problems

43 Education, Citizenship and Youth Relational Databases (35S) Plan, create, and use a relational database

44 Education, Citizenship and Youth 2D Animation (35S) Create two-dimensional animations

45 Education, Citizenship and Youth 3D Modeling (35S) Model three-dimensional objects

46 Education, Citizenship and Youth Broadcast Media (35S) Plan, develop, and broadcast multimedia

47 Education, Citizenship and Youth Interactive Media (35S) Plan, develop, and publish interactive media products

48 Education, Citizenship and Youth Computer Science (20S,30S,40S) Solve problems, learn and use programming languages and techniques

49 Education, Citizenship and Youth Implementation timeline September 2005 - Computer Science September 2008 – Senior Years ICT

50 Education, Citizenship and Youth Implementation School and Division decide: –Which optional courses to offer –Local prerequisites –Recognition of prior learning –Assessment

51 Education, Citizenship and Youth Implementation Possibilities Stand-alone courses Combine ICT courses Combine ICT and non-ICT courses –To support learning in non-ICT courses –To follow a theme –To support project based learning Challenge for credit

52 Education, Citizenship and Youth supplementarycomplementaryintegrated infused ICT Stand-alone course Complementary courses Combined courses Infused outcomes

53 Education, Citizenship and Youth School Initiated Courses (SICs) Schools may still submit ICT SIC’s SIC learning outcomes must go beyond the learning outcomes in the framework At least 50% of the learning outcomes in a SIC must be different than the learning outcomes in the curriculum framework

54 Education, Citizenship and Youth Professional Learning Community Forum for discussion and sharing http://webct.merlin.mb.ca/webct Request access to the community –Email dgervais@gov.mb.ca

55 Education, Citizenship and Youth

56 Darryl Gervais dgervais@gov.mb.ca Distance Learning and Information Technologies


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