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+ SW-PBIS: Painting a Picture of Implementation in Schools Serving Students with Significant Disabilities Dr. Amy L. Schelling Grand Valley State University.

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Presentation on theme: "+ SW-PBIS: Painting a Picture of Implementation in Schools Serving Students with Significant Disabilities Dr. Amy L. Schelling Grand Valley State University."— Presentation transcript:

1 + SW-PBIS: Painting a Picture of Implementation in Schools Serving Students with Significant Disabilities Dr. Amy L. Schelling Grand Valley State University SLIP Winter Conference January 23, 2014

2 + Background... PBIS Movement Roots In schools serving students with significant needs In response to aversive consequence techniques Catches on in K-12, focus moves away from students with significant disabilities

3 + A Brief Glimpse into the Literature... Challenging behavior not unique to individuals with DD Two to three times more likely to experience challenging behavior Lack of extensive behavioral repertoire Studies show implementation of SW-PBIS in alternate settings has positive effects Decrease of behaviors associated with tier two and three Increase implementation fidelity of interventions and supports Improvement in data collection methods

4 + The Study Respondents 25 Implementing, 4 Not Currently Implementing Effective Behavior Support Survey (version 2.0) University of Oregon, 2000 Self Assessment Tool widely used in K-12 Completed annually, all staff Examines status (In Place, Partial in Place, Not in Place) & Need for Improvement (High, Medium, Low) for features of School-wide Systems Non-classroom Settings Classroom Settings Individual Student Systems Results used to develop annual action plan

5 +

6 + Results: School-wide Systems

7 + Highlights... Most schools... Have established expected student behaviors in place Positively recognize students engaging in expected behaviors Have an established behavior support team All staff involved in school-wide interventions 82% defined a small number of positively and clearly stated rules 87% Procedures in place to address emergency/dangerous situations 77% School administrator active participant on team 91% reported having access to on-going training and support from the ISD in place or partially in place

8 + Possible Areas to Improve... 52% indicated that student behaviors are directly taught 23% indicated that problem behaviors are defined clearly 17% indicated that consequences for problem behaviors are defined clearly 36% indicated that training activities for students are developed, modified, and conducted based on school data

9 + Results: Non-classroom Settings

10 + Highlights... Expected student behaviors are monitored and rewarded in non-classroom settings 76% indicate that staff actively supervise students in non- classroom settings 76% indicated all staff are involved in management of non- classroom settings

11 + Possible Areas to Improve... Low implementation of a formal evaluation tool or process related to implementation/effectiveness of SW-PBIS components 24% indicated staff receive regular opportunities for developing and improving active supervision skills 25% indicated that the status of student behavior and management practices are evaluated at least quarterly from data

12 + Results: Classroom Settings

13 + Highlights... Participants indicated that within classrooms school-wide expectations for student behavior are implemented 76% indicated expected student behaviors and routines in classrooms are stated positively and defined clearly 71% indicated students experience high rates of success during classroom activities

14 + Possible Areas to Improve... 29% stated teachers have regular opportunities for access to assistance and recommendations 33% indicated that problem behaviors are defined clearly in each classroom 38% stated that in classrooms problem behaviors receive consistent consequences

15 + Results: Individual Student Systems

16 + Highlights... School behavior support teams are supportive and responsive to individual teacher needs 86% indicate the behavior support team responds promptly to students who present chronic problem behaviors 76% state a process exists for teachers to request assistance for individual students from the behavior support team 76% indicate the behavior support team includes someone skilled at conducting FBA’s

17 + Possible Areas to Improve... 19% indicate that their school includes formal opportunities for families to receive training on behavioral support/positive parenting strategies for individual students 33% state assessments are conducted regularly to identify students with chronic problem behaviors 48% indicate behavior is monitored and feedback provided regularly to the behavior support team for individual students

18 + Next Steps... Schools seem to be doing well with defining and rewarding positive expected student behaviors across systems and settings Areas where less implementation occurs appears related to identification of and consistent consequences for problem behavior and consistent data collection for decision-making Discussion...

19 + Effective Behavior Supports Survey Information EBS Self-Assessment Survey version 2.0 August 2003 ©2000 Sugai, Horner & Todd, Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon BIS_ResourceID=219 BIS_ResourceID=219 Amy’s Contact Information


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