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Workshop Building Trust through ‘open-to-learning’ conversations using ‘Disciplined Dialogue’ Griffith Institute for Educational Research.

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Presentation on theme: "Workshop Building Trust through ‘open-to-learning’ conversations using ‘Disciplined Dialogue’ Griffith Institute for Educational Research."— Presentation transcript:

1 Workshop Building Trust through ‘open-to-learning’ conversations using ‘Disciplined Dialogue’ Griffith Institute for Educational Research

2 School of Education and Professional Studies Practice Example 1. The Ecological Footprint of Household Pets (EASY) Household Pet Type Weight Kg Footprint SqM Yearly Cost $ Alsatian King Charles Spaniel Domestic Cat Guinea Pig Scraps Canary 50g The following numbers illustrate the Ecological Footprint for five pets:

3 Practice Example 2. Teachers’ views about working in a low SES community Griffith Institute for Educational Research

4 School of Education and Professional Studies Practice Example 3. (HARDER) Secondary teachers’ views on the literacy demands of subject teaching The frequency data provided were gathered in a government secondary school from teachers across years 8 to 12 (N=100). No subject specific breakdown are shown, only aggregated data are presented. Cashen and Dempster (2012)

5 Practice Example 4. Leadership for Literacy with Indigenous Partners Rate the strength of your agreement with the following statements using the 4 point Scale:  A – Always;  O – Often;  S – Seldom;  N – Never. Place a cross (X) in the box which best shows your view. Griffith Institute for Educational Research

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7 Leadership and Learning with Indigenous Partners Survey Categories (Clusters of Items)

8 Griffith Institute for Educational Research

9 School of Education and Professional Studies Practice Example 5. (HARDER) Secondary teachers’ views on the literacy demands of subject teaching The frequency data provided were gathered in a government secondary school from teachers across years 8 to 12 (N=100). No subject specific breakdown are shown, only aggregated data are presented. Cashen and Dempster (2012)

10 Practice Example 6. (Hard) This example shows the outcomes achieved by student in three across a forty week school year. In the following figure, individual students are indentified as ‘above’, ‘at’ or ‘below’ expected achievement levels Griffith Institute for Educational Research

11 School of Education and Professional Studies

12 References Day, C., Sammons, P., Hopkins, D., Harris, A., Leithwood, K., Gu, Q., and Brown, E. (2010) 10 Strong Claims about Successful Leadership, Nottingham, College for Leadership of Schools and Children’s Services. Dempster, N. (2009) Leadership for Learning: a synthesis of recent research, Edventures, Paper 13, The Australian College of Educators, Canberra. Dempster, N. (2012) Principals leading learning: developing and applying a leadership framework, Education 3–13, Vol. 40, No. 1, February 2012, 1–14 Leithwood, K., Day, C., Sammons, P., Harris, A. and Hopkins, D. (2006) Successful School Leadership: What is it and how it influences pupil learning, Nottingham. UK: National College for School Leadership. Robinson, Hohepa & Lloyd, (2009). School leadership and student outcomes: Identifying what works and why. Best evidence synthesis iteration. Wellington: Ministry of Education, p.49. Griffith Institute for Educational Research


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