Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

AGENDA 01/29/14 So You Think You Can Argue? Journal Response –Formative Assessment Review Unit’s Essential Questions and Lesson’s Objectives: Goal Setting.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "AGENDA 01/29/14 So You Think You Can Argue? Journal Response –Formative Assessment Review Unit’s Essential Questions and Lesson’s Objectives: Goal Setting."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 AGENDA 01/29/14 So You Think You Can Argue? Journal Response –Formative Assessment Review Unit’s Essential Questions and Lesson’s Objectives: Goal Setting (Homework) Differences between Persuasive and Argumentative Writing Argumentative Writing Unit Vocabulary Myths about Arguing Identifying Argumentative and Persuasive Characteristics

3 NO! Yes!

4 NO! Yes! Journal: What do you think is the difference between argumentation and persuasion?

5 SO YOU THINK YOU CAN Argumentative/Pe rsuasive Writing ARGUE

6 AN ARGUMENT VS. PERSUASION

7 WHAT IS AN ARGUMENT ?

8 An argument is just a statement that someone believes is or should be true. An argument is just a statement that someone believes is or should be true. Kids should be in school Monday through Saturday!

9 A counterargument expresses the opposite point of view. Kids should not have to go to school on Saturdays.

10 “I NEED BACKUP!” A main argument all by itself is not very strong. Supporting arguments explain why the main argument is true.

11 Main Argument Kids should not have to go to school on Saturdays. Kids should not have to go to school on Saturdays. Supporting Arguments Students need a rest. Students need a rest. Most working parents have weekends off, and students need to be with their families. Most working parents have weekends off, and students need to be with their families. Some students have jobs. Some students have jobs. Students need time for other activities. Students need time for other activities.

12 ARE YOU LABORING UNDER A Common myths about arguing MISCONCEPTION??

13 COMMON MYTHS ABOUT ARGUING Myth An argument is just people yelling at each other. Reality Arguments can be very calm. An argument in writing is silent!

14 COMMON MYTHS ABOUT ARGUING Myth You have to totally believe in what you are arguing. Reality Making an argument has nothing to do with how you feel. (Bet you can think of one reason why school should be on Saturdays…)

15 COMMON MYTHS ABOUT ARGUING Myth Every argument has a right and wrong side. Reality Most of the time, the two sides of an argument are just different opinions. Neither side is really right or wrong.

16 COMMON MYTHS ABOUT ARGUING Myth You can’t be good at arguing unless you can think fast on your feet. Reality A lot of great arguing takes place on paper, where you can take as much time as you need to think everything through.

17 ARGUE ON PAPER? WHY WOULD I WANT TO DO THAT?

18 Imagine this: Your state legislature is thinking about passing a law that says kids can’t drive until they are 18. You want to write a letter to convince your state senator to vote against the idea. What would you say?

19 Or this: Your city decided to close the park where you always hang out and play basketball. The city officials say there was too much trouble at the park and there was trash everywhere. Would you know what to write in a letter that would convince them to re-open the park? Uh-oh...

20 Or even this: You bought a used truck from the car lot downtown, but the truck didn’t have a stereo. The salesman told you they would take a stereo from a different truck and install it in your truck. He said it would work great. You drove your truck home and discovered the stereo doesn’t work at all! You called the car lot, but they refuse to fix the problem. You want to write a letter demanding they fix the stereo!

21 PERSUASIVE WRITING

22 What word do you see inside the word “persuasive”? ____________________________ ____________________________ persuade

23 What does it mean to “persuade” someone? (A)To disturb someone about something (B)To sweat on someone (C)To convince someone that something is true (D)To cause someone to be confused about something When you write persuasively, you use arguments to convince the reader that something is true.

24 TWO KINDS OF ARGUMENT S

25 Should/Should Not Does/Does Not Argue why something should or should not be true.

26 Should/Should Not Does/Does Not Argue why something should or should not be true. Argue why something does or does not violate a rule. T WO K INDS OF A RGUMENTS

27 Should/Should NotDoes/Does Not Argue why something should or should not be true. Argue why something does or does not violate a rule. Use this kind of argument when you are arguing your opinion about something. T WO K INDS OF A RGUMENTS

28 Should/Should NotDoes/Does Not Argue why something should or should not be true. Argue why something does or does not violate a rule. Use this kind of argument when you are arguing your opinion about something. Use this kind of argument when there is already a rule in place. T WO K INDS OF A RGUMENTS

29 Should/Should Not Does/Does Not Argue why something should or should not be true. Argue why something does or does not violate a rule. Use this kind of argument when you are arguing your opinion about something. Use this kind of argument when there is already a rule in place. Example: Should school be held Monday through Saturday? T WO K INDS OF A RGUMENTS

30 AGENDA Journal Argumentation vs. Persuasion Animal Testing: Identifying claims and counterclaims

31 JOURNAL What do you think are teenagers’ biggest challenges in our society? Please explain your answer.

32 AGENDA Review: Argumentation vs. Persuasion Animal Testing: Identifying claims and counterclaims Should/Should Not vs. Does/Does Not Arguments Practice in Groups

33 Should/Should Not Does/Does Not Argue why something should or should not be true. Argue why something does or does not violate a rule. Use this kind of argument when you are arguing your opinion about something. Use this kind of argument when there is already a rule in place. Example: Should school be held Monday through Saturday? Example: The school rule says no hats. Sarah wore a giant ribbon on her head. Did Sarah break the rule? T WO K INDS OF A RGUMENTS

34 CREATING MAIN “DOES/DOES NOT” ARGUMEN TS

35 LET’S PRACTICE! Your kid sister Sarah attends 2Cool4U Elementary School. The school rules say students are not allowed to wear hats inside the building. The rules say a hat is anything that covers and protects a person’s head. Sarah wore a giant ribbon in her hair and got in trouble for violating the no-hat rule! Did Sarah really violate the rule?

36 There are two possible main arguments: 1)Sarah did not violate the rule because her ribbon is not a hat, or 2)Sarah did violate the rule because her ribbon is a hat.  What do you think? (Wait—Don’t answer that yet…) (Wait—Don’t answer that yet…)

37 Ha! That was a trick question. Making arguments is a skill that you learn. “What you think” doesn’t really matter at all. You should be able to argue for both sides no matter which side you think is right.

38 LET’S TRY ANOTHER: The park rules say, “Don’t walk on the grass.” Misti avoided a neatly-mowed lawn but cut across another mowed area that was mostly weeds. Did Misti violate the rule? The two possible arguments are… 1.___________________________________ ___________________________________ 2.___________________________________ ___________________________________ Misti did not violate the rule because she walked on a weedy area, not on the grass. Misti did violate the rule because there was grass in the area where she walked.

39 AND ANOTHER: The beach rules say “Don’t feed the ducks.” Jason ate all but the corner of his sandwich, then tossed the last bite to a goose standing nearby. Did Jason violate the rule? The two possible arguments are… 1.___________________________________ ___________________________________ 2.___________________________________ ___________________________________ Jason did not violate the rule because a goose is not a duck. Jason did violate the rule because the beach rule means any water bird and a goose is a water bird.

40 AGENDA Greek and Latin Roots Should/Should Not vs. Does/Does Not Arguments Practice in Group Do curfews Keep Teens out of Trouble? Form Does/Does Not argument Watch video clips Brainstorm supporting details to argue both sides

41 LET’S TRY ANOTHER: The school rule says, “The use of cell phones is not allowed on school grounds.” Rachel was seen with her IPhone in her hand 15 feet from the school. She was seen by security and her phone was taken away. Did Rachel violate the rule? The two possible arguments are… 1.___________________________________ _____________________________________ _ 2.___________________________________ ___________________________________ Rachel did not violate the rule because she was not using her phone and she was 15 feet away from the entrance of the school. Rachel did violate the rule because she brought a phone to school and she was still on school grounds.

42 LET’S TRY ANOTHER: The Dollar store rule says, “No book-bags should be brought into the store.” Sarah walks in with her large shoulder bag and the cashier tells her take it off and leave it at the front registers. Is Sarah violating the rule by walking into the store with her shoulder bag? The two possible arguments are… 1.___________________________________ _____________________________________ _ 2.___________________________________ _____________________________________ Sarah is not violating the rule because she is carrying a shoulder bag, not a book-bag. Sarah did violate the rule because she brought a large bag that could contain books. The whole point is to not bring large bags into the store for security reasons.

43 AGENDA 02/10/14 Review Thesis Statements Revise Thesis Statements Journal/Skit Online Exercises: Word Parts Track Your Progress!

44 THESIS STATEMENT THAT NEED WORK Curfews do keep teenagers out of trouble because they might get into trouble, might be runaways, maybe doing drugs. Curfews do not keep teenagers out of trouble because kids are going to do something bad they’ll do it anyway regardless of time, they could sneek out any way, and the police don’t always catch them so they’ll continue doing it. No because bad kids make more trouble and like breaking rules.

45 THESIS STATEMENT THAT ARE GOOD Curfews do keep teenagers out of trouble because most gang activity happens at night, teens can get lost or kidnapped, and teens can be sexually assaulted at night. Chicago’s 10 o’clock curfew does keep teenagers out of trouble because it keeps them safe from strangers and people who wish to harm them, it keeps them from trying drugs or alcohol, and it keeps them from committing sexual acts. Curfews keep teenagers out of trouble because in Chicago, people say without curfews teenagers will participate in drugs, gangs, and commit other crimes.

46 JOURNAL What do you think is the main cause of behavior problems in teens? Please explain your answer.

47 WORD PARTS QUIZ Please define each of the word parts and write a word that contains that root: Am Auto Pseudo Path Phil

48 AGENDA 02/13/14 Video Clips: Do Violent Video Games Cause Behavior Issues in Teenagers Non-Fiction Reading Annotating Main Idea Graphic Organizer Author’s Purpose Online Exercises: Word Parts Track Your Progress!

49 KEEPING TRACK OF YOUR SCORE Beginner levels ScoreUnknown words 195%amiable=friendly, chronological=order of time

50 AGENDA 02/14/14 Journal: Persuasion LINE-up your opinions Informal Debate

51 PERSUASIVE NOTE Write a persuasive paragraph convincing someone that one of the following objects is the most romantic gift that you can ever give to a person. Your arguments but be clever and you must support your argument with examples. Stapler Rock Tissue Box Nail File Toilet Seat

52 STEP TOWARDS THE LINE IF YOU KNOW WHAT LOVE IS.

53 STEP TOWARDS THE LINE IF YOU THINK VALENTINE’S DAY IS FOR THE MARRIED/COUPLES.

54 STEP TOWARDS THE LINE IF YOU WOULD RATHER BE SINGLE.

55 STEP TOWARDS THE LINE IF YOU THINK ARRANGED MARRIAGES ARE A GOOD IDEA.

56 SHOULD VALENTINE’S DAY BE BANNED? WHY OR WHY NOT? Form arguments with relevant and effective main ideas and support.

57 AGENDA 02/18/14 Pen Pal Activity Write Letter and Type Format: Times New Roman, 12 point font, double spaced `

58 2

59 JOURNAL Please free write about your weekend. What was the most exciting activity you participated in? What was your least favorite part of the weekend?

60 DEVELOPI NG SUPPORTI NG ARGUMEN TS

61 A main argument by itself is not enough. You have to convince people why your main argument is true. You do this by using supporting arguments.

62 Next, let’s look at some supporting arguments. You will decide which main argument each supporting argument supports. Ready? HAT OR NOT?

63 Supporting Argument #1: The ribbon is something on her head. School Rule: A hat is anything that covers and protects a person’s head. (A)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did not violate the rule because her ribbon is not a hat. (B)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did violate the rule because her ribbon is a hat.

64 H AT OR N OT ? Supporting Argument #2: The ribbon is too flimsy to protect Sarah’s head. School Rule: A hat is anything that covers and protects a person’s head. (A)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did not violate the rule because her ribbon is not a hat. (B)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did violate the rule because her ribbon is a hat.

65 H AT OR N OT ? Supporting Argument #3: The ribbon does not cover all of Sarah’s head. School Rule: A hat is anything that covers and protects a person’s head. (A)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did not violate the rule because her ribbon is not a hat. (B)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did violate the rule because her ribbon is a hat.

66 H AT OR N OT ? Supporting Argument #4: The ribbon could protect her head from rain or dust. School Rule: A hat is anything that covers and protects a person’s head. (A)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did not violate the rule because her ribbon is not a hat. (B)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did violate the rule because her ribbon is a hat.

67 H AT OR N OT ? Supporting Argument #5: The ribbon would not keep Sarah’s head warm. School Rule: A hat is anything that covers and protects a person’s head. (A)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did not violate the rule because her ribbon is not a hat. (B)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did violate the rule because her ribbon is a hat.

68 H AT OR N OT ? Supporting Argument #6: The ribbon covers most of Sarah’s head. School Rule: A hat is anything that covers and protects a person’s head. (A)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did not violate the rule because her ribbon is not a hat. (B)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did violate the rule because her ribbon is a hat.

69 H AT OR N OT ? Supporting Argument #7: The ribbon could protect Sarah’s head from sunlight. School Rule: A hat is anything that covers and protects a person’s head. (A)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did not violate the rule because her ribbon is not a hat. (B)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did violate the rule because her ribbon is a hat.

70 H AT OR N OT ? Supporting Argument #8: The ribbon is not fitted to Sarah’s head. School Rule: A hat is anything that covers and protects a person’s head. (A)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did not violate the rule because her ribbon is not a hat. (B)This argument supports the idea that Sarah did violate the rule because her ribbon is a hat.

71 IF YOU’VE SEEN ONE ARGUMENT...

72 … you have not seen them all! Some arguments are better than others. Look at the four arguments below. Which one do you think is the strongest? Weakest? The ribbon is too flimsy to protect Sarah’s head from anything. The ribbon does not cover all of Sarah’s head. The ribbon would not keep Sarah’s head warm. The ribbon is not fitted to Sarah’s head.

73 MINI-QUIZ!

74 M INI Q UIZ  True  False 1.You can only make an argument about something if you feel very strongly about it. Making an argument has nothing to do with how you actually feel. It is a skill you learn.

75 M INI Q UIZ  True  False 2.Persuasive writing is meant to convince someone that something is true. Exactly! The whole point is to “persuade” someone.

76 M INI Q UIZ  True  False 3.All arguments are equally strong. Some arguments are stronger and more convincing than others.

77 M INI Q UIZ  True  False 4.If there is already a rule in place, you will use a should/should not argument. When there is already a rule, you will argue whether something does or does not violate that rule.

78 M INI Q UIZ  True  False 5.An argument is a statement that someone claims is or should be true. Whether you’re arguing that Sarah did violate the rule or that students should not go to school on Saturdays, you are claiming that statement is true.

79 M INI Q UIZ  True  False 6.An argument can take place without any yelling at all. We’re talking about arguments that are meant to persuade. Yelling won’t help, but good reasoning will.

80 M INI Q UIZ  True  False 7.There is a right and wrong side to every argument. Most of the time, the different sides of an argument are just different opinions. However, people may believe very strongly that one side is correct.

81 M INI Q UIZ  True  False 8.Sarah looks very cool in her big ribbon. Um… Everyone is entitled to an opinion!

82 M INI Q UIZ  True  False 9.People often use persuasive writing when writing letters about important issues. Writing letters is one of the most common uses of persuasive writing in everyday life.

83 M INI Q UIZ  True  False 10.You use arguments to persuade someone that your viewpoint is correct. That’s why it’s called “persuasive” writing!

84 N EXT TIME : What would you do if your school suddenly changed the rules and banned something you like to wear? This sounds like trouble...

85 AGENDA Journal Word Parts—Greek and Latin Roots Practice Quiz Argumentative Thesis Workshop Informal Debate

86 JOURNAL Why are rules and laws important? What would our world look like without any laws or rules? Elaborate on your answer.

87 AGENDA Journal: Free Write: What are you most looking forward to about Spring? Debate Dos and Don’ts Debate Prep Finalize Research Note-cards with facts and citations Review2` Roles Introductory speeches Presenting topic and argument Questioning Rebuttals Closing speeches Meet with your Side (A or B) to plan the final outline of the debate.

88 JOURNAL What questions do you have about the debate process so far? How prepared do you think you are starting today’s lesson? Do you think you will be prepared by the end of the day tomorrow?

89 ASSIGNING ROLES…. When you have finished your research, please identify the role that you will take and begin to prepare your part of the debate. Since half the class is arguing one side and the other half is arguing the opposite, there must be about 4 people assigned to each part of the debate: 4 for introductory speech 4 for questions 4-5 for rebuttals 4 for closing remarks You will get together as a “side” tomorrow to identify final roles. For now, (in your groups) 1-2 should prepare introduction, 1-2 questions, 1-2 rebuttals, 1-2 closing.


Download ppt "AGENDA 01/29/14 So You Think You Can Argue? Journal Response –Formative Assessment Review Unit’s Essential Questions and Lesson’s Objectives: Goal Setting."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google