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Theory & Application Theory & Application Presented by E. L. T. Supervisor : Shaker Othman Shaker Othman Al- Ahmadi Educational Zone E. L.T. Supervision.

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Presentation on theme: "Theory & Application Theory & Application Presented by E. L. T. Supervisor : Shaker Othman Shaker Othman Al- Ahmadi Educational Zone E. L.T. Supervision."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Theory & Application Theory & Application Presented by E. L. T. Supervisor : Shaker Othman Shaker Othman Al- Ahmadi Educational Zone E. L.T. Supervision E. L.T. Supervision 2007 / / 2008

3 Dedication To our dignified Senior Supervisor : * Mrs. Helena Mohamad. *To All Staff Members in Al-Ahmadi E.L.T. Supervision *To the E.L.T. Supervisor- General : *Mrs. Sakina Ali, with best regards and compliments. Shaker Othman: E.L.T Supervisor.

4 * What is creativity? (Introduction - Definitions -Thesaurus - Quotations ) * The Importance of Creativity * The Features of Creativity * The Essence of Creativity * How can you spot creativity? * How can teachers promote creativity? * Applications & Examples

5 Definitions & Thesaurus * The power or ability to invent : creativeness, ingeniousness, ingenuity, invention, inventiveness, originality. Creativity is the ability to think up and design new inventions, produce works of art, solve problems in new ways, or develop an idea based on an original, novel, or unconventional approach. * Creativity is the ability to think up and design new inventions, produce works of art, solve problems in new ways, or develop an idea based on an original, novel, or unconventional approach.

6 * Creativity is the ability to see something in a new way, to see and solve problems no one else may know exists, and to engage in mental and physical experiences that are new, unique, or different. * Ability to produce something new through imaginative skill, whether a new solution to a problem, a new method or device, or a new artistic object or form. The term generally refers a richness of ideas and originality of thinking.

7  Creativity is the ability and disposition to produce novelty. Children’s play and high accomplishments in art, science, and technology are traditionally called creative, but any type of activity or product, whether ideational, physical, or social, can be creative.  The aspect of intelligence characterized by originality of thought and problem solving. Creativity involves divergent thinking, that is, thoughts directed widely towards a number of varied solutions.

8 Creativity and intelligence Cerebral Cortex The frontal lobe (shown in blue) is thought to play an important role in creativityfrontal lobe

9 Creativity is “All our features: Creativity, culture and education”, the National Advisory Committee (1999). This report states that we are all, or can be creative to a lesser or greater degree if we are given the opportunity. The definition is broken down into four characteristics : - Thinking imaginatively - Purposeful : directed to achieving an objective - The processes of conducting a purposeful activity and thinking imaginatively generate something original. - The outcome must be of value in relation to the objective.

10 Imagination is definitely a key part of creativity. But are all imaginative ideas creative ?Originality What do we mean by originality? What might we mean by originality when we are talking about pupils’ learning? Original in relation to their previous work? Other pupils’ work? Work that has gained public recognition? - Skilled teachers can help pupils tackle questions, solve problems and have ideas original, the result of genuinely creative behaviour.Value - Imaginative activity can only be creative if it is of value in relation to its purpose. Teachers need to help pupils judge the value of what they and others have done through critical evaluation.

11  Creativity is typically used to refer to the act of producing new ideas, approaches or actions, while innovation is the process of both generating and applying such creative ideas in some specific context.

12 Creativity improves pupils’ self-esteem, motivation and achievement. Pupils who are encouraged to think creatively and independently become : * more interested in discovering things for themselves * more open to new ideas * keen to work with others to explore ideas * willing to work beyond lesson time when pursuing an idea or vision As a result, their pace of learning levels of achievement and self-esteem increase.

13 - Think creatively and critically, to solve problems and to make a difference for the better. - Have the opportunity to become creative, innovative, enterprising and capable of leadership to equip them for their future lives as workers and citizens. - Think creatively and critically, to solve problems and to make a difference for the better. - Have the opportunity to become creative, innovative, enterprising and capable of leadership to equip them for their future lives as workers and citizens.

14 - Respond positively to opportunities, challenges and responsibilities, to manage risk and to cope with change and adversity. - Pupils who are creative will be prepared for rapidly changing world, where they may have to adapt to several careers in a lifetime. - Respond positively to opportunities, challenges and responsibilities, to manage risk and to cope with change and adversity. - Pupils who are creative will be prepared for rapidly changing world, where they may have to adapt to several careers in a lifetime.

15 When pupils are thinking and behaving creatively in the classroom, you are likely to see them : questioning and challenging making connections and seeing relationships envisaging what might be exploring ideas, keeping options open reflecting critically on ideas, actions and outcomes When pupils are thinking and behaving creatively in the classroom, you are likely to see them : questioning and challenging making connections and seeing relationships envisaging what might be exploring ideas, keeping options open reflecting critically on ideas, actions and outcomes

16 A- When planning : Build creativity objectives into your planning ( you could integrate these with subject specific –objectives). Look for opportunities to promote creativity in your existing schemes of work and lesson plans. Could you adapt any activities so that they offer more potential for creativity?

17 A- When planning : Devise activities that are personally and culturally authentic. Try to build on pupils’ interests and experiences( both in and out of school.) Plan for a range of teaching and learning styles so that as many pupils as possible have the opportunity to show their creativity. Never lose sight of the importance of knowledge and skills. (1) How to build in opportunities for creativity.mov

18 A- When introducing activities: Give pupils a clear goal that is challenging yet achievable. Share objectives with the pupils and give them opportunities to choose ways of working and how to shape the direction of work.

19 A- When introducing activities: Simulating starting points- such as sights, sounds, smells, visits and contact with creative people- capture pupils’ interests and their imagination. (6) Relaxed environment & Thinking imaginatively.mov Give pupils a set of constraints ( e.g. limit time and / or resources). This makes an activity more approachable and can encourage pupils to improvise and experiment. (5) Pupils experiment with confidence, encouraged....mov

20 A- When teaching: Actively encourage pupils to question, make connections, envisage what might be and explore ideas. Promote and reward imagination and originality. Ask open-ended questions such as ‘What if…?” and “ How might you..?” to help pupils see things from different perspectives.

21 A- When teaching: Value and praise what pupils do and say. Establish an atmosphere in which they feel safe to say things, take risks and respond creatively. Create a fun, relaxed working environment if you want to encourage pupils to be adventurous and explore ideas freely. Create conditions for quiet reflection and concentration if you want to encourage pupils to work imaginatively.

22 A- When teaching: ( continued ) Make the most unexpected events. When appropriate, put aside your lesson plan and “ go with the moment”, but never lose sight of your overall learning objectives. Be willing to stand back and let pupils take the lead. However, make sure that you are always on hand to provide prompts and support as needed.

23 A- When teaching: ( continued ) Join in with activities and model creative thinking and behaviour. Showing the pupils that you are a learner too can help to create an open, constructive learning environment. Give pupils opportunities to work with others from their class, year group and different age groups.

24 A- When receiving work : Help pupils to appreciate the different qualities in others’ work and to value ways of working that are different from their own. Help pupils to give and receive constructive feedback.

25 A- When receiving work : Help pupils to develop criteria that they can use to judge their own work. Stop regularly fro open discussion of the problems pupils are facing and how they can solve them. Encourage pupils to share ideas with others and to talk about their progress.

26 ..\(1) How to build in opportunities for creativity.mov ..\(2) Role-play activities capture pupils' imagination.mov ..\(3) Pupils are given clear instructions.mov ..\(4) Open-ended questions.mov

27 ..\(5) Pupils experiment with confidence, encouraged.mov ..\(6) Relaxed environment & Thinking imaginatively.mov ..\(7) Going with the flow and maintaining the objectives.mov ..\( 8) Sharing ideas & working together.mov

28 1. Specific Grammar Points A- Scissors and the Present Perfect Tense e.g. - I have lived in Kuwait all my life. - I have seen the film three times. - I have just had breakfast

29 1. Specific Grammar Points B- A Pencil Sharpener and Reduced Relative Clauses e.g. - The man who was wounded in the accident was my neighbour. - * The man * * wounded in the accident was my neighbour. - - The exercise which was explained was easy. - - The exercise **explained was easy.

30 1. Specific Grammar Points C- A Tie and Prepositions e.g. ( real or imaginary ) - ( under / over / under again / over again / then up / behind the knot / through the knot / then down /

31 1. Specific Grammar Points D- A Stapler and Relative Clauses e.g. - The man that I saw was crying. - * The man I saw was crying. - The man that cried was taken to the police station.

32 2. Drills A- A Ruler and a Drill e.g. 1. I’m going home. - I’m going home. - ( two possible pronunciations ) 2- black bird - blackbird - That white bird is an albino blackbird. ( makes sense if the stresses are as indicated, but nonsense if we substitute black bird )

33 2. Drills B- An Empty Bottle and a Drill ( The point here is to get student to listen and focus on word order )

34 3. Free Speaking Activities A- Tennis Balls and Conversations ( A tennis match can be a metaphor for a conversation. ) B- Discussion and a Microphone This is suggested by television programme hosts, who control conversations by the use of the microphone. – Students in groups are given a microphone ( imaginary, or a real microphone disconnected or something to represent a microphone) to have the chance to speak.

35 Thanks to the School Principal Mrs. Juhara, the English Staff Members in Afraa` Primary School for Girls for their sincere efforts and cooperation. We hope that you’ve profited from our modest workshop wishing you all the best of everything. Al-Ahmadi E.L.T. Supervision 2007 / 2008


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