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Whose Number Will Be Up Next?! The tragic plight of the Earth’s disappearing species Garry Chapman October, 2001.

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Presentation on theme: "Whose Number Will Be Up Next?! The tragic plight of the Earth’s disappearing species Garry Chapman October, 2001."— Presentation transcript:

1 Whose Number Will Be Up Next?! The tragic plight of the Earth’s disappearing species Garry Chapman October, 2001

2 What do these numbers mean to you? , ,000 5, , zero Click on any number here Click here last

3 FIVE There have been five great mass extinctions on Earth between 440 and 65 million years agoThere have been five great mass extinctions on Earth between 440 and 65 million years ago Return to number grid Snow Leopard endangered

4 ONE Before humans arrived on Earth, only one species per million, on average, became extinct each yearBefore humans arrived on Earth, only one species per million, on average, became extinct each year Return to number grid Passenger Pigeon extinct

5 10,000 Today, up to 10,000 species per million face extinction each year, largely due to human influencesToday, up to 10,000 species per million face extinction each year, largely due to human influences Return to number grid Thylacine extinct

6 SIX Scientists believe we may be experiencing mass extinction number six right nowScientists believe we may be experiencing mass extinction number six right now Return to number grid Red Shanked Douc Langur endangered

7 337 Since 1500 AD, 337 vertebrate species have become extinctSince 1500 AD, 337 vertebrate species have become extinct Return to number grid Freshwater Sawfish endangered

8 27,000 An estimated 27,000 species, predominantly insects and plants, disappear each year in rain forests aloneAn estimated 27,000 species, predominantly insects and plants, disappear each year in rain forests alone Return to number grid Luschan’s Salamander vulnerable

9 5,435 The current number of known threatened bird and mammal species is 5,435. In 1996, there were 5,205The current number of known threatened bird and mammal species is 5,435. In 1996, there were 5,205 Return to number grid Asian Three-Striped Box Turtle critically endangered

10 65 There are roughly 65 bird and mammal species at risk in each of Brazil, China and IndonesiaThere are roughly 65 bird and mammal species at risk in each of Brazil, China and Indonesia Return to number grid South American Marsh Deer vulnerable

11 11,000 More than 11,000 plant and animal species face extinction in the near futureMore than 11,000 plant and animal species face extinction in the near future Return to number grid Wandering Albatross globally threatened

12 25 25% of all mammal species are at risk25% of all mammal species are at risk Return to number grid Ethiopian Wolf critically endangered

13 % of all bird species are at risk12.5% of all bird species are at risk Return to number grid Spix’s Macaw nearing extinction

14 19 Since 1996, the number of critically endangered primate species has grown from 13 to 19Since 1996, the number of critically endangered primate species has grown from 13 to 19 Return to number grid Orangutan endangered

15 ZERO We can no longer afford to treat the world’s wonderful creatures like a set of meaningless numbersWe can no longer afford to treat the world’s wonderful creatures like a set of meaningless numbers Let’s do what we can to make zero the number of species that die out in the next decadeLet’s do what we can to make zero the number of species that die out in the next decade

16 Sources National Geographic, October 2001, ‘Paving the Road to Extinction’National Geographic, October 2001, ‘Paving the Road to Extinction’ International Union for the Conservation of Nature Union for the Conservation of Nature Committee on Recently Extinct Organisms on Recently Extinct Organisms


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