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Glocal interpretations of crisis: Beyond the rhetoric?

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Presentation on theme: "Glocal interpretations of crisis: Beyond the rhetoric?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Glocal interpretations of crisis: Beyond the rhetoric? http://www.lidice-memorial.cz/mchild_history_en

2 Margaret Stuart Jayne White and Ingrid Pramling-Samuelson Sarah Te One, Rebecca Blaikie, Zoey Caldwell and Michelle Egan-Bitran

3 Questions for discussion Who defines a ‘crisis? To what extent is ‘crisis’ an economic outcome? Is it possible to talk of children’s rights in a crisis? Who defines a ‘crisis? To what extent is ‘crisis’ an economic outcome? Is it possible to talk of children’s rights in a crisis?

4 commit2dallas.orgcommit2dallas.org - Human Capital Theory – ECE as foundational

5 Data to inform New Zealand policy Then In the absence of empirical studies, it was impossible to say how far incentives to work and to take risks were affected by the greater security provided by welfare measures or the higher taxation involved, but there was probably some adverse effect involved. Now 78 Recommendations … strategy & accountability; tax credits; benefits & income support; child support; employment, skills and training; housing; Māori & Pasifika children; problem debt; health and disability; education; local communities & family; justice system; research and evaluation.

6 Economic Universals ‘travel’ to Aotearoa ‘It is a rare public policy initiative that promotes fairness and social justice and at the same time promotes productivity in the economy and in society at large. Investing in disadvantaged young children is such a policy’. ff Economic, Neurobiological & Behavioral Perspectives on Building America's Future Workforce. Knudsen. He

7 Actuarial investment approach Paula Bennett 30 March, 2010 We have changed the process around sanctions so that when obligations are not met a first time, a fifty percent cut in the benefit kicks in. – That means those who don't turn up for a scheduled job interview for example, will lose half their benefit unless they have a very good reason for failing to meet their obligations. – If they don't turn up the next time, their benefit will be cut completely. – Except for those with dependant children, who will lose a maximum of half their benefit, with no change to add-ons like accommodation supplement - so their children are not penalised unfairly. We have changed the process around sanctions so that when obligations are not met a first time, a fifty percent cut in the benefit kicks in. – That means those who don't turn up for a scheduled job interview for example, will lose half their benefit unless they have a very good reason for failing to meet their obligations. – If they don't turn up the next time, their benefit will be cut completely. – Except for those with dependant children, who will lose a maximum of half their benefit, with no change to add-ons like accommodation supplement - so their children are not penalised unfairly.

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9 Who/what is OMEP? End poverty Empower girls and women Provide quality education and life- long learning for sustainability End poverty Empower girls and women Provide quality education and life- long learning for sustainability

10 OMEP questions 1. What do you see as the three main areas of 'crisis' for children in your country right now? Please explain why they constitute a significant crisis and what they 'look like' in your context? 2. To what extent do/don't the policy agendas in your country respond to these areas? 3. What are the consequences for children and families? 1. What do you see as the three main areas of 'crisis' for children in your country right now? Please explain why they constitute a significant crisis and what they 'look like' in your context? 2. To what extent do/don't the policy agendas in your country respond to these areas? 3. What are the consequences for children and families?

11 Crises by country Countries surveyed … Cameroon Chile China Czechoslovakia Europe and the UK India Sweden New Zealand Cameroon Chile China Czechoslovakia Europe and the UK India Sweden New Zealand Issues raised Access to ECE Quality issues Child health issues Adult health and education issue Private/public tensions in provision Lack of funding for under 3s Access to ECE Quality issues Child health issues Adult health and education issue Private/public tensions in provision Lack of funding for under 3s

12 And now a European insight Yes, we cannot be happy, we cannot be proud of our civilisation when every single child lacks the possibilities to grow to all his or her potentials

13 Since the problems a nation faces are not isolated and are intermingled with each other, the solutions too cannot be unidimensional. A lot of new public as well as private initiatives have been carried out to counteract such issues, but their impact is overshadowed with the enormity of the problems. It will take a lot more than few government schemes … to overcome these problems. (OMEP India, p.14).

14 Constructions of children that are associated with the child rights movement now emphasise children as citizens having rights and agency, rather than solely as dependents within their family. Such constructions uphold the value of viewing ECEC as a cooperative effort between the family and the state rather than a private responsibility (Mitchell & Press, 2013, p. 158).

15 Can we persist in espousing children’s rights when clearly these are subsumed by the economic, political and social priorities of adults who do not always have their ‘best interests’ at heart?

16 What are children’s rights Children’s participation rights create an ambiguous agenda On whose terms do children participate? In whose best interests is their participation? What does non-participation mean? Children’s participation rights create an ambiguous agenda On whose terms do children participate? In whose best interests is their participation? What does non-participation mean? Protection Rights Provision Rights Participation Rights

17 UN Committee on the Rights of the child the views of children are not adequately represented within the family, in schools and in the community there are no means by which children can express their views in the public domain, the State Party does not systematically take into consideration children’s views when formulating laws and policies that may affect them … the views of children are not adequately represented within the family, in schools and in the community there are no means by which children can express their views in the public domain, the State Party does not systematically take into consideration children’s views when formulating laws and policies that may affect them …

18 Well intentioned but … Children are … portrayed as wilful ‘tearaways’ that terrorise teachers, communities and each other and as innocent ‘victims’ of feckless, irresponsible parents … Government is not clear as to what extent children and young people can be responsible for themselves and others (Such & Walker, 2005, p. 40). Why do adults consult with children? Where are children’s views heard? Who represents these? Adults views of childhood influence how they interpret children’s opinions

19 What makes a good childhood If you want a happy childhood you need great education and great family (Primary School Voices). Support me in my decisions, but not make them for me (Taiohi Voice). If you want a happy childhood you need great education and great family (Primary School Voices). Support me in my decisions, but not make them for me (Taiohi Voice). What makes a good childhood? What does being fair to kids mean to you? What makes kids happy?

20 Anything can go wrong My Self - My Poverty Story Anonymous, Paeroa I come from a big family of TEN Our life revolved around DRUGS, ALCOHOL, MONEY, GANGS VIOLENCE and ABUSE. Throughout our lives all we could depend on was each other. Mum was an alcoholic and was rarely home, and then only to recover from a nights drinks. If dad wasn't at home he was either in jail, at work or down at the Mongrel Mob pad. I reckon you don't have to be poor to live the life of poverty. We were impoverished by a lack of emotional support, love and security What can go wrong? What are the things that all children should have? How can we make sure that all children get what they need? What can go wrong? What are the things that all children should have? How can we make sure that all children get what they need?

21 The role of government The Government need to make sure that all kids get a fair chance. They should have the same opportunities to learn, like rich kids get scholarships, not the poor kids. We need to make sure everyone gets an equal chance. If you are on a benefit, the price of university should be lowered. [There should be] equal opportunities for education (Primary school voices). If the government was being fair to all kids, what does that mean? If things aren’t fair, what should the government do? How should the government help kids do well (thrive, belong and achieve)? How do you think the government should help families and children? If the government was being fair to all kids, what does that mean? If things aren’t fair, what should the government do? How should the government help kids do well (thrive, belong and achieve)? How do you think the government should help families and children?

22 Don’t just listen, do something PLEEZZE To people in power + the Government – don’t tuck us away as a statistic (This is how I see it). “Dear Matua John, Bring back Māori tradition!!! Kōhanga Reo, food, spiritual, our land! Our kids, kids, want to grow up the same way we did!!!! PLEEZZE To people in power + the Government – don’t tuck us away as a statistic (This is how I see it). “Dear Matua John, Bring back Māori tradition!!! Kōhanga Reo, food, spiritual, our land! Our kids, kids, want to grow up the same way we did!!!!

23 And now the challenge … There is no statutory requirement in UNCROC that children’s views must be acted on.

24 Questions for discussion Who defines a ‘crisis? To what extent is ‘crisis’ an economic outcome? Is it possible to talk of children’s rights in a crisis? What are our responsibilities locally? globally? Who defines a ‘crisis? To what extent is ‘crisis’ an economic outcome? Is it possible to talk of children’s rights in a crisis? What are our responsibilities locally? globally?


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