Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Islamophobia Nimit Patel. The spark.  Sept. 11 th, 2001– the attacks on the WTC caused immediate panic and uproar after Osama Bin Laden took responsibility.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Islamophobia Nimit Patel. The spark.  Sept. 11 th, 2001– the attacks on the WTC caused immediate panic and uproar after Osama Bin Laden took responsibility."— Presentation transcript:

1 islamophobia Nimit Patel

2 The spark.  Sept. 11 th, 2001– the attacks on the WTC caused immediate panic and uproar after Osama Bin Laden took responsibility.

3  The Bush Administration committed itself to the “War on Terror” and in doing so stripped the rights of some American citizens.  Surveillance  Deportation  Etc.. Politics

4  I believe that this concept of islamophobia is extremely ignorant and discriminatory.  Also, it’s kind of a “wake-up call” to the fact that history DOES in-fact repeat itself (prejudice throughout time)  Native Americans  African Slavery  Holocaust  Japanese Americans during WWII  Isn’t it time we broke the cycle? My opinion

5 Socially Religiously Professionally 3 aspects. content/uploads/2010/06/employment-discrimination.jpg discrimination-300x210.jpg

6 Religion– Islam Islam comes from the word Salam which translates into peace. Islam- SalamIslam- Salam – 5:38 “The Peace in balance…where everyone can respect each other…”

7 Video 0:00-1:10 What is the reason for singling out Muslim citizens as opposed to domestic terrorist groups?  Political power (McCarthy hearings reference)

8  Video on the building of Islamic community center in NYC. Islamic Community CenterIslamic Community Center 3:20-5:20 The FDI/SIOA soeaker stated “…selfish, and self-serving attitudes”

9 What do they think? Same video 5:22-5:37 A suicidal society?? This is what those who oppose Islam perceive Islam to be about. The opposition to Islam

10  They are of course referring to Sharia–the Islamic law. “Sharia, therefore, is constantly evolving, with different Islamic scholars – Sunni/Shia, conservative/liberal, Arab/non-Arab – offering differing interpretations. Yet here in the UK, ahead of the government’s publication of its updated strategy for tackling extremism and terrorism on 7 June, officials briefed friendly reporters that any “advocacy of sharia law” would be deemed a failure to “reflect mainstream British values” and seen as a sign of extremism.” (Mehdi Hasan) “Then there are those practicing and observant Muslims – moderate, integrated, non-violent – who would consider themselves to be adherents of sharia in an ethical or social sense. Are they extremists, too?” (Mehdi Hasan)

11 “Before September 11 people thought it’s a country of freedom, individual freedom, freedom of speech, political freedom … The expression ‘who cares’ was frequently used. Our community also used this word a lot. I do not hear this word any more after 9/11. What people thought about freedom already has been curtailed. Before September 11 we never thought that we are under watch. Now that registration program was enacted for some select countries, Bangladesh included. … There is a third eye always following you, so you ought not to do anything that might bring you troubles. When I talk over telephone I always think that they are taping my conversations; I never thought that before.” – Abu Taher (Rahman, 58) Social

12 The very first amendment of America’s constitution gives freedom of religion however, why is it that negative connotations are allowed on those who may or may not even be Muslim?

13 “I fear being hated and blamed by the very city I love. I am a Bangladeshi woman and my last name is Rahman, a Muslim name. … I am so used to thinking about myself as a New Yorker that it took me a few days to begin to see myself as a stranger might: a Muslim woman, an outsider, perhaps an enemy of the city. Before last week, I had thought of myself as a lawyer, a feminist, a wife, a sister, a friend, a woman on the street. Now I begin to see myself as a brown woman who bears a vague resemblance to the images of terrorists we see on television and in the newspapers … as I become identified as someone outside the New York community, I feel myself losing the power to define myself and losing that wonderful sense of belonging to this city.” (Rahman, 2001: 27) The account of a New Yorker

14 There is also a violent side.. “I always hear comments like 'destroy the Muslim country,' 'bomb them,' 'this is a religious war,' in my workplace.” “My boss fired me after 9/11 and said if he saw me again, he would kill me.” “I got fired and, before that, my boss used to call me Osama Bin Laden” “Once my daughter, a teacher, was walking home from school. Five older kids started swearing at her 'go back to your country' 'terrorist' throwing garbage and empty soda cans at her. She was scared. There was 5 of them but she talked back to them 'Don't play with me, I was born here too.' Then she slipped into the store for shelter.” “He went so far as to spit on my pregnant sister and my car, he also said.' Don't worry, I'll be back at this house to make sure I slit your throats open.’” From the Survey of Anti-arab and Muslim Discrimination; 2003; right%2Bwing%2Byouths%2Btaunt%2Bmembers%2Bof%2Bthe%2BEnglish%2BDefence%2BLeague%2Bduring%2Ba%2Brally%2B on%2BSeptember%2B5,%2B2009%2Bin%2BBirmingham,%2BEngland.%2BThe%2BEnglish%2BDefence%2BLeague%2B(EDL).jpg

15 The “it-happens-to-everyone” mentality...  Does that still make it right?! The opposition. “Should we treat every attack on a Muslim as Islamophobic? If an Afghan taxi driver is assaulted, is this a racist attack, an Islamophobic incident or simply random violence? Such uncertainty gives licence to peddle all sorts of claims about Islamophobia.” (Kenan Malik, 2005) I agree with his point. However, after reading an article which showed that more Jews were mugged/robbed/harassed than Muslims in NYC in a given year, it’s obvious (at least to me) that the “it-happens-to-everyone” justification is invalid.

16  Muslims and Arabs are being discriminated against in the workplace as well. Professionally "These are pretty tough times for their community," says Mr. Miller, the EEOC commissioner, "and I believe it is the responsibility of the government and employers, especially under these difficult times, to protect these workers from discrimination and to reinforce the principles of equality.” (Valbrun; 2003)

17 A few examples “The lady at the temp agency was cordial at first. When she heard my accent and found out I spoke Arabic, she said there were no positions.” “ When applying for work, the first question they ask is 'Where are you from?' then their response is, 'There is no work.’” “ I find that because of my name - Arabic – people often do not call me in for interviews even though I have the qualifications. People are more apt to accept me if they see me first because I look American.” “ I find that because of my name - Arabic – people often do not call me in for interviews even though I have the qualifications. People are more apt to accept me if they see me first because I look American.” From the Survey of Anti-arab and Muslim Discrimination; 2003; 11

18 People on the other end, argue that Arabs and Muslims are trying to make things a racial issue when in fact it is either personal or professional. The opposition ‘Michael Haley, the hospital's president and chief executive, said Ms. Abdullah's allegations are unfounded. "It was strictly a personnel matter and nothing more," he said of her dismissal. "Our information is exactly the opposite of what she said and what she filed with the EEOC, and all of that will come out as the suit moves forward.”’ (Valbrun;2003) I understand what Haley is saying in this, and I do agree with the possibility of Arabs/Muslims taking things the wrong way (filing for racial discrimination suits). However through the first hand accounts I have read, it’s clear that there are a majority of instances where racial discrimination takes place in the professional setting.

19 These aspects (Social, religious, and professional) are all clear signals of present day discrimination. And as ignorant as it is, it continues to fester in the modern world. We (humans) have seen how discrimination has played out in the world’s past. YET, we have allowed it to happen again.. I sincerely hope that mankind learns from its mistakes and sets the world on a path towards global respect and peace. Conclusion

20 Works Cited - -www.nyc.gov/html/cchr/pdf/sur_report.pdf -http://0-web.ebscohost.com.opac.sfsu.edu/ehost/detail?vid=4&hid=19&sid= d a724- a8caf59f7322%40sessionmgr15&bdata=JkF1dGhUeXBlPWlwLGNvb2tpZSx1cmwsdWlkJnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ %3d%3d#db=a9h&AN= http://0-web.ebscohost.com.opac.sfsu.edu/ehost/detail?vid=11&hid=19&sid= d a724- a8caf59f7322%40sessionmgr15&bdata=JkF1dGhUeXBlPWlwLGNvb2tpZSx1cmwsdWlkJnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ %3d%3d#db=a9h&AN= http://0-web.ebscohost.com.opac.sfsu.edu/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=f8560e9c-20c1-469a-a6d2- 5c645d891703%40sessionmgr115&vid=2&hid=119 -http://0-www.lexisnexis.com.opac.sfsu.edu/hottopics/lnacademic/? -http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB ,00.html -http://0-cdy.sagepub.com.opac.sfsu.edu/content/22/1/49.full.pdf+htmlhttp://0-cdy.sagepub.com.opac.sfsu.edu/content/22/1/49.full.pdf+html -http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viduR1dQBgs&feature=player_embedded


Download ppt "Islamophobia Nimit Patel. The spark.  Sept. 11 th, 2001– the attacks on the WTC caused immediate panic and uproar after Osama Bin Laden took responsibility."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google