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Outcomes & Metrics Early Learning Hubs TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE WEBINAR 2014 PRESENTED BY Pam Curtis Megan Irwin.

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Presentation on theme: "Outcomes & Metrics Early Learning Hubs TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE WEBINAR 2014 PRESENTED BY Pam Curtis Megan Irwin."— Presentation transcript:

1 Outcomes & Metrics Early Learning Hubs TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE WEBINAR 2014 PRESENTED BY Pam Curtis Megan Irwin

2 Agenda HUB OVERVIEW PRESENTATION QUESTIONS & ANSWERS UPCOMING WEBINARS CONTACT INFORMATION Heidi McGowan Webinar Facilitator

3 Early Learning Council Goals THE GOALS  Children ready for success in kindergarten when they arrive.  Children raised in stable and attached families.  Services that are integrated and aligned into one early learning system focused on results.

4 WHAT IS AN EARLY LEARNING HUB?  A self-organized community-based coordinating body created to provide a “system approach” to early childhood education that works to improve efficiency and outcomes for our youngest children. Early Learning Hubs

5 EARLY LEARNING HUB WILL  Build on existing community resources and assets  Ask tough questions about what could be done differently to get better results, especially for at risk children  Communities have the option to define their own strategies and service areas to achieve the outcomes  Under the community based leadership of Early Learning Hubs bring public schools, early learning providers, health care, social services and the private sector together around shared outcomes, for the first time in Oregon’s history.

6 OUTCOMES & METRICS EARLY LEARNING HUBS Presentation by Pam Curtis Megan Irwin

7 Why outcomes matter? EARLY LEARNING HUB OUTCOMES

8  45,000 children born each year  315,000 ages 0-6  40% at risk (n=~120,000)  $380+ million per year focused on prevention  $1.7 billion per biennia on young children/families  Serving 25-33% of at-risk children Outcomes: Why bother?

9 Our results On the 2013 Kindergarten Assessment  33% of entering kindergartners could name 5 or fewer letters and 14% couldn’t name any letters.  37% couldn’t identify a single letter sound.  About half of our kindergartners could answer at least half of the questions correctly.  25% of entering kindergartners did not regularly demonstrate skills like completing tasks and following directions.

10 Outcomes we’re measuring  Kindergarten readiness  Increasing the number of quality education and care settings (QRIS)  Increasing performance on the domains measured by the Kindergarten Assessment.  Stable and attached families  Increasing the number of children who receive developmental screening prior to age three.  Increasing the number of children with access to primary care.  Reducing child abuse and neglect.  System coordination  Reducing administrative overhead.  Improving the ways programs coordinate into a system.

11 Unpacking our outcomes EARLY LEARNING HUB OUTCOMES

12 A quick word on data sources  The state has the data you need to set accountability baselines.  Staff assembling baseline data upon receipt of letter of interest.

13 Kindergarten Readiness – Quality Care and Education Settings  The Quality Rating Improvement System (QRIS) is our measurement for the quality of licensed child care and educational settings.  The QRIS measures quality at five tiers:  Licensing – basic health and safety  Commitment to Quality – commitment to move beyond basic health and safety.  Three, Four and Five Stars – escalating sets of standards focused on improving quality.

14 Kindergarten Readiness – Quality Care and Education Settings Quality Rating Improvement System BaselineTargeted for Year 2 Improvement Targeted Year 3 Improvement Increase the number of high quality early learning and care facilities in coverage area as measured by QRIS: Licensed facilities: 334 Commitment to quality: 75 Commitment to quality: ___ Three star: 4Three star: __Three star: ___ Four star: 1Four star: ___ Five star: 0Five star: ___

15 State Level Data help measure progress over time Data help target resources to Early Learning Hubs and schools Early Learning Hubs Data help measure progress over time Data help target local supports, strategies and interventions Community Level Schools: Data inform classroom instruction Pre-K and Early Learning: Data inform program and curriculum design Kindergarten Assessment: The Look Forward and Look Back

16 Kindergarten Assessment  EARLY LITERACY (direct assessment)  English letter names  English letter sounds  Spanish syllable sounds*  *only for Spanish Speaking English Language Learners  EARLY MATH (direct assessment)  Numbers and Operations  APPROACHES TO LEARNING (observational assessment)  Child Behavior Rating Scale

17 Kindergarten Readiness – Kindergarten Assessment BaselineTargeted Year 2 Improvement: Targeted Year 3 Improvement: Metric 2: Increase performance of target population on the kindergarten assessment Early literacy letter names: Early literacy letter names: ___% Early literacy letter sounds: Early literacy letter sounds: ___% Early math numbers and operations: Early math numbers and operations: ___% Approaches to learning self- regulation: Approaches to learning self- regulation: ___% Approaches to learning interpersonal skills: Approaches to learning interpersonal skills: ___%

18 Family Stability – Developmental Screening  Early identification of risk is important to prevention.  Developmental growth is not just physical.  Less than 50% of children who need extra support get it before school.  Healthcare and childcare are critical developmental opportunities.  Opportunity for creativity abounds!

19 Family Stability – Developmental Screening BaselineTargeted Year 2 Improvement: Targeted Year 3 Improvement: Increase the number of children who receive developm ental screening prior to age three Number of children in target population who receive developmental screening prior to age three: % increase of children in target population who receive developmental screening prior to age three: ___%

20 Family Stability – Access to primary care  Healthy children are Ready; Ready children are Healthy.  Primary care home is an approach – much like Hubs.  Primary care home is the anchor for health care and linkage to other needed services.  Primary care homes and family resource managers are on-point for coordination.

21 Family Stability – Access to primary care BaselineTargeted Year 2 Improvement: Targeted Year 3 Improvement: Increase the number of children with access to a Patient Centered Primary Care Home (PCPCH): Number of children in target population with access to a PCPCH: % increase of children in target population with access to a PCPCH: ___%

22 Family Stability – Reducing child abuse and neglect  Children are best raised in families.  Healthy, stable and attached families raise the healthiest children.  Oregon has the 13 th highest foster care rate in the nation.  Renewed statewide effort and resources.  The role of an Early Learning Hub in making progress in this area should really focus on child neglect and abuse prevention.

23 Family Stability – Reducing child abuse and neglect BaselineYear 2 TrendsTargeted Year 3 Improvement: Decrease the number of children and families involved with the child welfare system as measured by: - Decreasing the number of children age 0 through 6 who enter foster care. - Decrease the number of children age 0 through 6 who return to foster care. - Increase the number of children involved with the child welfare system who are served safely and equitably at home. Number of children age 0 through 6 who enter foster care: Hub will observe trends in the number of children age 0 through 6 who enter foster care. Number of children age 0 through 6 who enter foster care: ___% Number of children age 0 through 6 who return to foster care: Hub will observe trends in number of children age 0 through 6 who return to foster care. Number of children age 0 through 6 who return to foster care: ___% Number of children involved with the child welfare system who are served safely and equitably at home: Hub will observe trends in number of children involved with the child welfare system who are served safely and equitably at home. Number of children involved with the child welfare system who are served safely and equitably at home: ___%

24 System Coordination  Historical approach of individual programmatic efforts and funding streams. Resulting in:  Poor outcomes  Increasing need for resources to sustain myriad approaches  Called to integrate services, funds and use data to drive approaches  Proxy measures:  Increasing the number of children served  Reducing the age of onset of first service for high risk children  Reducing cost per child, including administrative overhead

25 Webinars  March 6thEquity and Family Engagement 10:00-11:00 am  March 19 th Building a Strong K-3 Connection 10:00-11:00 am  March 27thOregon’s QRIS 10:00-11:00 am  March 31 st Building a Strong Health Care Connection 12:00-1:00 pm

26 Pam Curtis, Chair of the Early Learning Council Deputy Director, Center for Evidence-based Policy, Oregon Health & Sciences University Megan Irwin, Early Learning System Design Manager Contact Information


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