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Universities and civic engagement: a critique and a prospectus Keynote address for the 2nd biennial “Inside-out” Conference on the civic role of universities.

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Presentation on theme: "Universities and civic engagement: a critique and a prospectus Keynote address for the 2nd biennial “Inside-out” Conference on the civic role of universities."— Presentation transcript:

1 Universities and civic engagement: a critique and a prospectus Keynote address for the 2nd biennial “Inside-out” Conference on the civic role of universities - “Charting Uncertainty: capital, community and citizenship” University of Queensland, Ipswich 3 July 2003 by Sir David Watson University of Brighton

2 Introduction: some dilemmas of engagement

3 “Engagement implies strenuous, thoughtful, argumentative interaction with the non-university world in at least four spheres: setting universities’ aims, purposes and priorities; relating teaching and learning to the wider world; the back-and-forth dialogue between researchers and practitioners; and taking on wider responsibilities as neighbours and citizens”. (ACU, 2001: i)

4 “As powerful, cosmopolitan, moral and intellectual enterprises dedicated to the betterment of humanity, universities are now uniquely capable of leading and sustaining a global social movement to accelerate human progress towards participatory democratic schooling systems and participatory democratic societies.” (University of Pennsylvania, 2001)

5 “The skills of a nation’s workforce and the quality of its infrastructure are what makes it unique and uniquely attractive in the world economy…so important are these public amenities, in particular the university and the airport, that their presence would stimulate some collective analytical effort, even on a parched desert or frozen tundra. A world class university and an international airport combine the basic ingredients of global symbolic analysis: brains and quick access to the rest of the world.” (NCIHE, 1997: 190)

6 “As well as securing our economic future, learning has a wider contribution. It helps make ours a civilised society, develops the spiritual side of our lives and promotes active citizenship. Learning enables people to play a full part in their community. It strengthens the family, the neighbourhood and consequently the nation. It helps us fulfil our potential and opens doors to a love of music, art and literature. That is why we value learning for its own sake, as well as for the equality of opportunity it brings.” (DfEE, 1998: foreword)

7 conservative and radical critical and supportive competitive and collegial autonomous and accountable private and public excellent and equal entrepreneurial and caring certain and provisional traditional and innovative ceremonial and iconoclastic local and international

8 “Inside-out” developments epistemology

9 Mode 1 and Mode 2 Pure Disciplinary Homogeneous Expert-led Supply-driven Hierarchical Peer-reviewed University-based Applied Problem-centred Transdisciplinary Heterogeneous Hybrid Demand-driven Entrepreneurial Network-embedded (Gibbons et al. 1994)

10 “Inside-out” developments epistemology curriculum

11 Source: UUK 2002

12 “Inside-out” developments epistemology curriculum the students’ “social sphere”

13 “In their speech, our respondents recognised four circuits: (i) those of student peers; (ii) the intergenerational; (iii) that of imagined ‘abstract others’ as recipients of state welfare; (iv) and the formal constitutional dimension of their relationship to state and government. These circuits were governed by principles such as fairness, altruism, reciprocity and responsibility that we will sum up in the more general term, ‘mutuality.’ …. The moralising of extended relationships in this manner counters both the fears of those who believe that the absence of a language of formal citizenship indicates privatised withdrawal and those who would wish to celebrate the primacy of calculative individualism.” ( Ahier et al. 2002:141 )

14 “Inside-out” developments epistemology curriculum the students’ “social sphere” wider benefits new models of capability

15 The Information Age Mindset Computers aren’t technology Internet better than TV Reality no longer real Doing rather than knowing Nintendo over Logic Multitasking a way of life Typing rather than handwriting Staying connected Zero tolerance for delays Consumer/Creator blurring Based on Frand (2000)

16 “Inside-out” developments epistemology curriculum the students’ “social sphere” wider benefits new models of capability life-styles

17 Source: Banks and Winn 2002 University of Brighton: Student Finance Survey

18 “Inside-out” developments epistemology curriculum the students’ “social sphere” wider benefits new models of capability life-styles the academic profession

19 Age profile of permanent academic staff: 1995 and 2000 Source: HEFCE 2002

20 “Inside-out” developments epistemology curriculum the students’ “social sphere” wider benefits new models of capability life-styles the academic profession

21 “Outside-in” developments rival centres of reference social polarisation educational inflation public confidence

22 8459It is important for me to know about science 8272Science research should be supported by the Government (even if no immediate benefits) 7243The benefits of science are greater than harmful effects 3844Science makes our lives change too fast 8667S&T make our lives better US UK % agreement Public attitudes to science and technology: UK/US comparison 1 Science and the Public NSF science and engineering indicators 2002 Professor David King Marie Jahoda Lecture 9 October 2002

23 “Outside-in” developments rival centres of reference social polarisation educational inflation public confidence economic utility the rise of the “creative class”

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25 The US class structure, Source: Florida 2002

26 “Outside-in” developments rival centres of reference social polarisation educational inflation public confidence economic utility the rise of the “creative class” political controversy

27 The global challenge ethics indigenous development intellectual property

28 “Today when we talk of globally applicable laws, no national laws, least of all American laws, can serve as a role model. This is because so far laws have been made to safeguard national or local interests. Global laws require fresh thinking. When the world was Euro-centric, it was easy to define what was new. If Europe did not know of it, it did not exist before: the ‘first European to produce metallic zinc’ could be granted a patent (1738), but not the inventor of the telescope 100 years previously, ‘on the ground that it is evident that several others have knowledge of its invention.’ By the same logic, if the knowledge is available anywhere in the world today, it should not be possible to patent it.” (Kochhar, 2002)

29 The global challenge ethics indigenous development intellectual property quality global citizenship

30 The challenge of engagement We need to understand and build on our history. We need to be more conscious of the public interest in universities, and our obligations to maintain and develop it. We need to internalise the principles of working in partnership.

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32 Conference themes capital: human, social and creative community

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34 Conference themes capital: human, social and creative community citizenship

35 The successful 21st century university It has to devise an excellent portfolio of courses, and teach them well. It has to contribute at the highest level in at least some aspects of research. It has to engage with its community, economically and culturally. It has to be a comfortable and enjoyable place to work for everyone: students and staff of all kinds. It has to be, and be seen to be, ethically and environmentally responsible. It has to earn and sustain a positive reputation, locally, nationally and internationally. It has to be able to recruit and to retain good students and good staff. It has to understand itself, where it has come from, what challenges and what opportunities it faces, and how to meet these. It has progressively to play a part in improving the domains in which it works, like education, the environment, or health. Not least, it has to live through its graduates and its external clients, wherever they are and whatever they do.

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