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Leicester Warwick Medical School Mechanisms of Disease Regeneration and Fibrous Repair Dr Peter Furness Department of Pathology.

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Presentation on theme: "Leicester Warwick Medical School Mechanisms of Disease Regeneration and Fibrous Repair Dr Peter Furness Department of Pathology."— Presentation transcript:

1 Leicester Warwick Medical School Mechanisms of Disease Regeneration and Fibrous Repair Dr Peter Furness Department of Pathology

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3 REGENERATION AND REPAIR Regeneration: replacement of functional, differentiated cells Repair: production of a fibrous scar

4 REGENERATION Labile cells: - normal state is active cell division - usually rapid regeneration Stable cells: - not normally dividing at a significant rate - speed of regeneration variable Permanent cells: - unable to divide - unable to regenerate

5 Factors controlling regeneration: Complex and poorly understood. ‘Growth factors’ –EGF, PDGF, FGF, IGF... –Hormones e.g. ACTH, œstrogen, growth hormone... Contact with basement membranes & adjacent cells –Signalling through integrins NOTE: importance of growth control in CANCER.

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8 Acute damage to kidney - regeneration Mitotic figures

9 FIBROUS REPAIR: The development of a fibrous scar. Rabbit ear chamber example. –Blood clot forms. –Acute inflammation around the edges. –Chronic inflammation: Macrophages infiltrate the clot. –Capillaries and lymphatics sprout and infiltrate. –Myofibroblasts infiltrate and differentiate. –Glycoproteins and COLLAGEN are produced –Cell population falls, vessels differentiate and are reduced in number. –Collagen matures AND CONTRACTS.

10 Rabbit Ear Chamber: Direct observation of fibrous repair. 1) Exudate clots.2) Neutrophils infiltrate and digest clot 3) Macrophages and lymphocytes are recruited

11 Rabbit Ear Chamber: Direct observation of fibrous repair. 4) Vessels sprout, myofibroblasts make glycoproteins 5) Vascular network; collagen synthesised; macrophages reduced 6) Maturity. Cells much reduced; collagen matures, contracts, remodels

12 Angiogenesis

13 The Extracellular Matrix Collagen –Type I - Bone, tendon, scars. Type III - ‘tissue scaffold’. Type IV - non-fibrous, basement membranes... Elastin Glycoproteins –Fibronectin, Osteonectin, Tenascin,... Proteoglycans –Heparan sulphate proteoglycan,...

14 Specific features of fibrous collagens Triple helical fibrils Fibrils arrange in ‘quarter stagger’ mode to form insoluble fibres Relatively resistant to general proteases; slow remodelling by specific collagenases

15 SKIN WOUNDS: Healing by “Primary Intention” Epidermis regenerates Dermis undergoes fibrous repair. Sutures out at 5-10 days: approx. 10% normal strength. Maturation of scar continues up to 2 years. Minimal scarring, good strength Risk of trapping infection under skin - produces abscess.

16 Healing by ‘primary intention’: A clean, sutured wound.

17 SKIN WOUNDS: Healing by “Secondary Intention” Quantitative differences. –Initial contraction (in furry animals!) –Clot dries to form a ‘scab’ or ESCHAR –Epidermis regenerates beneath. –Repair process produces GRANULATION TISSUE Comparison with primary intention: –Takes longer –Produces a larger scar; not necessarily weaker –Produces more late contraction

18 An open wound: Healing by ‘secondary intention’

19 Regeneration and repair combined: A chronic peptic ulcer

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21 CONTROL OF REPAIR Poorly understood. Angiogenesis –Various angiogenic cytokines, e.g. VEGF, bFGF... Fibrosis –various pro-fibrotic cytokines, e.g. TGF beta, PDGF,... Limitation of fibrosis and remodelling –Hardly anything known!

22 FACTORS INFLUENCING WOUND HEALING Local factors: –Type, size, location of wound –Apposition, lack of movement –Infection: Suppuration, Gangrene, Tetanus (Secondary hæmorrhage) –Blood supply: Arterial, Venous –Foreign material: dirt, glass, sutures, necrotic tissue –Radiation damage

23 FACTORS INFLUENCING WOUND HEALING General Factors: –Age –General state of health chronic diseases e.g. diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis etc. –Drugs (n.b. steroids) and hormones –General cardiovascular status –General dietary deficiencies e.g. protein –Specific dietary deficiencies Vitamin C sulphur-containing amino acids

24 Complications of Repair Insufficient fibrosis: –Wound dehiscence; hernia; ulceration Excessive fibrosis: –Cosmetic scarring; hypertrophic scars; keloid Excessive contraction: –Limitation of joint movement (Contractures); obstruction of tubes & channels (Strictures)

25 Coal worker’s pneumoconiosis

26 Alcoholic cirrhosis in the liver

27 Special features of healing in specific organs For self-directed study. As a minimum, learn about: Liver (n.b. regeneration in acute versus chronic damage) Kidney (n.b. ‘acute tubular necrosis’) Heart (see ‘myocardial infarction’) Bone (n.b. ‘Callus’) Cartilage (Can it???) Peripheral nerve (n.b. ‘Wallerian degeneration’; axon sprouting) Central nervous system (n.b. gliosis)

28 ‘Contracture’ following a major burn

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