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How do we ensure we engage particular groups of students? Lessons from deaf-gain Peter Felten Elon University

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Presentation on theme: "How do we ensure we engage particular groups of students? Lessons from deaf-gain Peter Felten Elon University"— Presentation transcript:

1 How do we ensure we engage particular groups of students? Lessons from deaf-gain Peter Felten Elon University

2 The problem with heuristics Co-construction Student engagement – Student learning and success are linked more closely to what students do at university than what they bring to higher education (Kuh, 2003) – …“often has a normative agenda” (Trowler, 2010) Disability

3 Deaf-gain Deaf-gain calls attention to the ways in which the visual, spatial, and kinesthetic structures of deaf epistemologies may provide insights into ways of knowing that are advantageous for all humans, regardless of hearing capacity. (Bauman & Murray, 2010) “The human brain does not discriminate between the hands and the tongue…people do.” (Pettito, 2009)

4 Deaf-gain in a visual world (McLeod, 1994)

5 Eye to eye culture Deafspace Deaf walk Sensory commons

6 Lessons from deaf-gain 1.Begin by questioning your own assumptions about why groups of students do or do not engage. 2.Look for assets and capacities within groups that can enhance engagement and learning for all. 3.Beware of simplifying heuristics – and identities.

7 References Bauman, H-D. L. & Murray, J. J. (2010). Deaf studies in the 21st century: Deaf-gain and the future of human diversity. In M. Maschark & P. E. Spencer (Eds), Oxford handbook of deaf studies, language, and education, vol. 2. New York: Oxford University Press. Felten, P., & Bauman, H-D. L. (forthcoming). Reframing diversity and student engagement: Lessons from deaf- gain. In L. Dunne & D. Owen (Eds.), The student engagement handbook: Practice in higher education. London: Emerald. Harper, S. R. (2009). Institutional seriousness concerning black male student engagement: Necessary conditions and collaborative partnerships. In S. R. Harper & S. J. Quaye (Eds.), Student engagement in higher education: Theoretical perspectives and practical approaches for diverse populations. New York: Routledge. Kuh, G. D. (2003). What we’re learning about student engagement from NSSE. Change, 35:2, McLeod, S. (1994). Understanding comics: The invisible art. New York: William Morrow. Petitto, L.A. (2009). Scientific research on the positive effect of signed language in the human brain. Effect of Language Delay on Mental Health Conference. Toronto, Canada. October 16. Trowler, V. (2010). Student engagement literature review. The Higher Education Academy.


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