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1 DI & GT Workshop Part Two Facilitated by: Dr. Stephen Schroeder-Davis

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2 1 DI & GT Workshop Part Two Facilitated by: Dr. Stephen Schroeder-Davis ssd@elkriver.k12.mn.us

3 2 From Lo to High Prep DI Lo-PrepHigh-Prep Book choices Homework options Varied pacing with anchor options Open-ended activities Multiple levels of ?’s Work alone, pairs, trios, quads Product options Tiering activities, products, centers Tiering (centers) Contracts Complex instruction Think-tac-toe Pre-assessments and compacting Interest groups & centers

4 3 Know, understand, be able to... Know: facts, vocabulary, dates, places, names, examples, but NOT in isolation. Understand: major concepts, statements of truth, connections, key ideas. Anything that helps students make connections and get the “point” of the lesson. Be able to: apply and transfer the skills of any discipline and to think like the professionals who work in the field.

5 4 From Lo to High Prep DI Anchor Activities Stratified questions (Bloom & open-ended) Choice boards Product differentiation (Sternberg & Gardner) Tiering Layered curriculum The parallel curriculum

6 5 http://www.ready.gov If you have set yourself on fire, do not run.

7 6 http://www.ready.gov If you hear the Backstreet Boys, Michael Bolton or Yanni on the radio, cower in the corner or run like hell.

8 7 http://www.ready.gov That closet door in your bedroom leads to the gates of Hell. Don't go there.

9 8 http://www.ready.gov If your intended destination is suddenly vaporized, consider pulling over and watching the cool light show.

10 9 Confused language Her vocabulary was as bad as, like, whatever. The little boat gently drifted across the pond exactly the way a bowling ball wouldn’t. McBride fell 12 stories, hitting the pavement like a Hefty bag filled with vegetable soup. He fell for her like his heart was a mob informant, and she was the East River. She had a deep, throaty, genuine laugh, like that sound a dog makes just before it throws up.

11 10 Using Anchor(ing) Activities

12 11 RAPID ROBIN The “Dreaded Early Finisher”

13 12 “I’m Not Finished” Freddie “It takes him an hour-and-a-half to watch 60 Minutes.”

14 13 One premise in a differentiated classroom: “ In this class we are never finished--- Learning is a process that never ends.”

15 14 Anchor Activities éAéAnchor activities are ongoing assignments that students can work on independently throughout a unit, a grading period or longer.

16 15 Some Anchor Activities ê “Brain Busters” ê Learning Packets ê Activity Box ê Learning/Interest Centers ê Vocabulary Work ê Accelerated Reader ê Investigations ê MSPAP or CRT Practice Activities ê Magazine Articles with Generic Questions or Activities ê Listening Stations ê Research Questions or Projects ê Commercial Kits and Materials ê Journals or Learning Logs ê Silent Reading (Content Related?)

17 16 The Purpose of an Anchor Activity is to: Provide meaningful work for students when they finish an assignment or project, when they first enter the class or when they are “stumped”. Provide ongoing tasks that tie to the content and instruction. Free up the classroom teacher to work with other groups of students or individuals.

18 17 Using Anchor Activities to Create Groups Teach the whole class to work independently and quietly on the anchor activity. Half the class works on anchor activity. Other half works on a different activity. Flip-Flop 1/3 works on anchor activity. 1/3 works on a different activity. 1/3 works with teacher---direct instruction. 1 2 3

19 18 ANCHOR ACTIVITIES Can be: used in any subject whole class assignments small group or individual assignments tiered to meet the needs of different readiness levels Interdisciplinary for use across content areas or teams

20 19 ANCHOR ACTIVITIES Work best: êwhen expectations are clear and the tasks are taught and practiced prior to use. êwhen students are held accountable for on task behavior and/or task completion.

21 20 Planning for Anchor Activities Subject/Content Area: Name and description of anchor activity: How will activity be introduced to students? - Points- Percentage of Final Grade - Rubric- Portfolio Check - Checklist- Teacher/Student Conference - Random Check- Peer Review - On Task Behaviors- Other _______________ How will the activity be managed and monitored?

22 21 Practicing with anchor activities Please share with your table and the whole group any anchoring activities you have used. Using the template, take 15 minutes to brainstorm some possible anchoring activities. Share with your table and the whole group.

23 22 From Lo to High Prep DI Anchor Activities Stratified questions (Bloom & open-ended) Choice boards Product differentiation (Sternberg & Gardner) Tiering Layered curriculum The parallel curriculum

24 23 KNOWLEDGE: Information retrieval--remembering/recall COMPREHENSION: Taking new information via some form of communication and being able to make some use of the materials or ideas APPLICATION: Applying information correctly ANALYSIS: The identification or classification of elements and relationships among elements SYNTHESIS: The generation of new and creative ideas EVALUATION/JUSTIFICATION: The ability to make judgments about the value of knowledge BLOOM’SBLOOM’S TAXONOMYTAXONOMY

25 24 Applying Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Knowledge Information retrieval remembering/recall Materials/Situations: Events, people, newspapers, magazine articles, definitions, videos, dramas, textbooks, films, television programs, recordings, media presentations Measurable Behaviors: Define, describe memorize, label, recognize, name, draw, state, identify, select, write, locate, recite

26 25 Applying Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Comprehension Taking new information via some form of communication and being able to make some use of the materials or ideas Materials/Situations: Speech, story, drama, cartoon, diagram, graph, summary, outline, analogy, poster, bulletin board Measurable Behaviors: Summarize, restate, paraphrase, illustrate, match, explain, defend, relate, infer, compare, contrast, generalize

27 26 Applying Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Application Applying information correctly Materials/Situations: Diagram, sculpture, illustration, dramatization, forecast, problem, puzzle, organizations, classifications, rules, systems, routines Measurable Behaviors: Apply, change, put together, construct, discover, produce, make, report, sketch, solve, show, collect, prepare

28 27 Applying Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Analysis The identification or classification of elements and relationships among elements Materials/Situations: Survey, questionnaire, an argument, a model, displays, demonstrations, diagrams, systems, conclusions, report, graphed information Measurable Behaviors: Examine, classify, categorize, research, contrast, compare, disassemble, differentiate, separate, investigate, subdivide

29 28 Applying Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Synthesis The generation of new and creative ideas Materials/Situations: Experiment, game, song, report, poem, prose, speculation, creation, art, invention, drama, rules Measurable Behaviors: Combine, hypothesize, construct, originate, create, design, formulate, role-play, develop

30 29 Applying Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Evaluation/Justification The ability to make judgments about the value of knowledge Materials/Situations: Recommendations, debate, editorials, self- evaluations, group discussions, court trial Measurable Behaviors: Compare, recommend, assess, value, apprise, solve, criticize, weigh, consider, debate

31 30 Putting Bloom’s to work : At your tables, sort the “biography” cards in ascending order from lowest to highest (simple to complex) thinking levels. Choose a spokesperson to read the cards and discuss the process with the large group. Be prepared to discuss.

32 31

33 32 Effective Schools and Teachers X2 Average school & teacher Ineffective teacher in an ineffective school Ineffective Teacher in an Effective School Effective Teacher in an Ineffective School Average Teacher in an Effective School Effective Teacher in an Effective School? 50% 6% 37% 63% 78% 96%

34 33 Promoting Higher Order Thinking The griney grollers grangled in the granchy gak. What kind of grollers were they? What did the grollers do?

35 34 In what kind of gak did they gangle?In what kind of gak did they gangle? Place one line under the subject and two lines under the verb.Place one line under the subject and two lines under the verb. The griney grollers grangled in the granchy gak.The griney grollers grangled in the granchy gak.

36 35 Upping the Ante In one sentence, explain why the grollers were grangling in the granchy gak. Be prepared to justify your answer. The griney grollers grangled in the granchy gak. If you had to grangle in a granch gak, what one item would you choose to have with you and why?

37 36 Moral Students can answer low-level questions without thinking. Students enter & exit classrooms with no more understanding of what they’ve learned than the “Griney Groller” taught you!

38 37 Why teach higher order thinking? “Every day thinking, like ordinary walking, is a natural performance we all pick up. Good thinking, like running a fast race, is a technical performance...

39 38 Sprinters have to be taught to run well; good thinking is the result of good teaching, which includes much practice.” David Perkins

40 39 Why is it important to develop HOTS? In our increasingly complex and specialized society, it is becoming imperative that individuals become capable of thinking divergently and creatively. It is also important that individuals see the relationships between seemingly diverse concepts.

41 40 Wait Time(s) “Waiting’ briefly (5-10 seconds) before accepting responses - and again after the student response - has the effect of increasing the depth of students’ answers. In addition, wait time increases student-to-student interaction.

42 41 “Higher Level” Questions Produce Deeper Learning Than “Lower Level Questions”

43 42 The common feature of higher-level questions is a requirement that students restructure information or apply knowledge in some way.

44 43 Questioning Protocols EVERYBODY is Questioned EVERYBODY Justifies answers NOBODY gets to say “I don’t know”

45 44 Levels of Abstraction Recall Translate & paraphrase Interpret (provide the essential meaning) Classify(arrange according to commonalities)

46 45 Apply to familiar situationsApply to familiar situations Analysis (compare, contrast)Analysis (compare, contrast) Synthesis (re-create to form a coherent whole)Synthesis (re-create to form a coherent whole) Evaluation (to determine and defend a value)Evaluation (to determine and defend a value) Extrapolation (transfer to novel situations)Extrapolation (transfer to novel situations)

47 46 Examples of stratified tasks for fourth grade electricity Red Task (easier) Draw and label a diagram of a complete circuit. Gather and label a collage of objects that are conductors and insulators. Blue Task (more complex) Use a Venn diagram or T-chart to explain how a parallel circuit compares with a series circuit. Design a poster illustrating three electrical safety tips. Black Task (most complex) Describe or illustrate three ways the world would be different if electricity had not been discovered. Create a brochure advertising the benefits of a new product that uses electricity.

48 47 Examples of stratified tasks for fifth grade biographies Red Task (easier) Draw a timeline of important events in the person’s life. List four reasons the person is famous (include drawings or photos). Blue Task (more complex) Write an article for People magazine describing the person’s contributions to society. Compare and contrast two famous people we have studied. Describe how they were similar and different. Black Task (most complex) Describe or illustrate three ways the world would be different if this person had not been born. Choose the person you believe has contributed the most to society and write a recommendation for the “hall of fame”. Support your choice with examples and logic. Dodge, J. 2005

49 48 Mixing Gardner & Bloom Write 3 journal entries in an immigrant’s diary... (interpersonal) Write 3 headlines that you would find in the Renaissance Times... (verbal-linguistic) that compare three ways life in Ireland was different than life in New York City. (analysis) that show your understanding of how life has changed since the Middle Ages. (analysis)

50 49 Mixing Gardner & Bloom Write a book for children... (verbal-linguistic) Gather an artifact box that includes at least 10 items from your everyday life... (bodily - kinesthetic) that explains and compares rational and irrational numbers. (analysis/synthesis) that use or represent (decimals, percents, geometric shapes etc). (application)

51 50 Mixing Gardner & Bloom Invent your own mythological creature to invite to diner... (verbal-linguistic) Create a treasure chest for the novel we are reading... (bodily-kinesthetic) and create a story about the dinner consistent with your character’s personality. (synthesis) that demonstrates your understanding of the setting, characters, symbols, and themes and include an explanation for each item. (analysis)

52 51 Mixing Gardner & Bloom Create an illustrated booklet on the body systems... (verbal-linguistic and spatial) Create a photojournal about the biome we are studying... (naturalist/spatial) to show how at least two organs function in more than one system. (analysis and synthesis) that compares plant and animal life and land and climate in winter and summer. (synthesis)

53 52 Practicing with Bloom & Gardner Using p.96 as a guide, complete the template on p. 98 and transfer it to a transparency. Select a spokesperson to present your final product to the group Using pp. 98 & 99 as guides, complete the template on p. 100 and transfer it to a transparency. Select a spokesperson to present your final product to the group.

54 53 From Lo to High Prep DI Anchor Activities Stratified questions (Bloom & open-ended) Choice boards Product differentiation (Sternberg & Gardner) Tiering Layered curriculum The parallel curriculum

55 54 Tic-Tac-Toe / Bingo TTT or Bingo activities can be used to differentiate content or levels of content Use when there are two or more types of tasks you want students to practice Allowing students to choose tasks gives them input into their learning and can assist in motivating them through interest

56 55 Tic Tac Toe Non-Fiction Books Create crossword puzzle of vocabulary words B Write a newspaper article using facts from the book B Create a board game using the facts from the book. A Create an informational brochure with the facts A Create a topic web for the facts B Create a PowerPoint presentation of the facts A Construct a diagram, model, or chart of facts B Role-play a news report with the facts A Create a rap, poem, or song with the facts A

57 56 Tic Tac Toe Fiction Books Write a new ending, an epilogue or sequel to the story A Compose a letter to a character, the author or between two characters A Write and dramatize a commercial promoting the book A Illustrate a poster about the book B Construct story map or storyboard of events ALL Script and role-play a scene from the book B Compare, contrast two characters on a chart A Write a character sketch B Create a conversation between 2 characters A

58 57 Math Review Tic Tac Toe Solve three problems using both analytical and graphing methods. B Create a way of demonstrating understanding of the concepts and ideas in the chpt. A Define the chapter’s vocabulary words with sketches or drawings. B Solve two of the challenge problems A Take end of chapter test ALL Complete every fourth problem in chpt. review B Create three word problems using the chapter’s information. A Solve one even numbered application problem from each section B Identify four ways that concepts or ideas are used in the “real world” A

59 58 Practicing with choice boards Using either the CD Roms, examples from the power point, or the handouts, construct a choice board with your table. Transfer the template choice board to a transparency. Select a spokesperson to present your board to the group.

60 59

61 60 RAFT Role, Audience, Format and Topic Can be used as a type of reading reflection strategy Can be used in any subject area to enhance conceptual understanding Decide: –Important concepts/principles/content –Find a variety of resources –Brainstorm possible roles for students to assume –How will the RAFT match the student

62 61 Romeo and Juliet RAFT ROLEAUDIENCEFORMATTOPIC JulietNurseSong“The perfect man” Lady CapuletBenvolioFormal requestHelp me understand my son BenvolioRomeoNoteJuliet WHO? ParisLord CapuletPetitionReasons I’d be a good husband TybaltLord CapuletSketchGuess who came to your party JulietLady CapuletPracticing a speech Help me tell dad I’m married

63 62 RAFT Activities Provide insight into characters Understanding of the relationship between characters and audience Develops other insights into conflicts

64 63 Role-a-die-RAFT ROLEAUDIENCEFORMATTOPIC 1)Settler AdultGovernmentSongTell of the journey 2) NativeAdult back homeSketchWhat lies ahead 3) ScoutNative LeaderPoemTrials & Tribulations 4) GovernmentChild back homeModelNeed resources 5) MilitaryDiaryLetterHELP! 6) Settler ChildPerson in another country MapHow exciting

65 64 Story Starters WHATWHOWHEREWHEN 1) ScaredRomeoChapelLate at night 2) HappyJulietBedroomEarly morning 3) BraveBenvolioCourt yardNoon 4) ForgetfulNursePublic SquareTwilight 5) AngryLord CapuletBalconyAfter the party 6) SadLady Montague At homeBefore the party

66 65 Practicing with RAFT Using either the CD Roms, examples from the power point, or the handouts, construct a choice board with your table. Transfer the template choice board to a transparency. Select a spokesperson to present your board to the group.

67 66 RoleAudienceFormatTopic Practice with RAFT

68 67 Totally 10: Differentiated Scores Scores are calibrated according to Bloom Tasks are scored at various levels depending on level of challenge Students must “score” a 10 Students must select tasks from at least 2 categories Projects are graded on quality Weight your grades based on level of challenge and contribute to a final overall grade

69 68 Totally 10: A Mythology example Score 2 (20% of final grade) Construct a family tree with various mythological creatures Create a poster showing corresponding Greek and Roman gods and goddesses and creation myths Create a story featuring a mythical creature See Heacox, D. Differentiating Instruction in the Regular Classroom, Free Spirit Press

70 69 Totally 10: A Mythology example Score 4 (40% of final grade) Make a chart or diagram comparing and contrasting a mythical character from another culture to one from Greece or Rome Select a contemporary super hero and write a newspaper article describing how this hero has mythical traits See Heacox, D. Differentiating Instruction in the Regular Classroom, Free Spirit Press

71 70 Totally 10: A Mythology example Score 6 (60% of total grade) Write an original dialogue between two mythical characters. Make sure their discussion is consistent with their adventures and characteristics as detailed in our readings. Design a mystery book of mythical characters with enough details to help a knowledgeable reader discover their identities See Heacox, D. Differentiating Instruction in the Regular Classroom, Free Spirit Press

72 71 Totally 10: A Mythology example Totally 10 (100% of final grade) Create a mythical character for the present time. Write a sketch to identify your character’s personality, appearance, and powers. Including mythical elements, dramatize, do storytelling, make a video, create a comic book, or select another way to tell one of your creation’s adventures. See Heacox, D. Differentiating Instruction in the Regular Classroom, Free Spirit Press

73 72 Totally 10 Practice 2 pts4pts 6pts 10pts

74 73 From Lo to High Prep DI Anchor Activities Stratified questions (Bloom & open-ended) Choice boards Product differentiation (Sternberg & Gardner) Tiering Layered curriculum The parallel curriculum

75 74 Triarchic (Sternberg’s) Intelligence Analytic intelligence: these people do well with school tasks such as organizing information, seeing cause and effect, taking notes, and memorizing. Practical intelligence: these people like to see how things “work,” and learn better by using ideas rather than just learning ideas. They need to solve problems in a meaningful context. Creative intelligence: these people like to experiment with ideas and come at things in fresh and surprising ways. They think divergently.

76 75 Sample DI Lessons using Triarchic Intelligence: Biology Know Cell Parts and functions Understand A cell is a system of interrelated parts Be able to Analyze the interrelations of cell parts and functions Present understandings in a clear, useful, interesting, and fresh way

77 76 Sample DI Lessons using Triarchic Intelligence: Biology Analytical Use a cause & effect chain to show how cell parts are interrelated and how they function together. All Triarchic lessons adapted from C. Strickland & Cheryl Dobbertin, ASCD

78 77 Sample DI Lessons using Triarchic Intelligence: Biology Practical Find or create a system that would serve as an analogy to the cell system. Illustrate your system in a way that will help viewers understand the cell system better.

79 78 Sample DI Lessons using Triarchic Intelligence: Biology Creative - Choice A Use unlikely material to depict the structure and function of a cell. Select materials and arrange them in a way that will explain the cell to viewers.

80 79 Sample DI Lessons using Triarchic Intelligence: Biology Creative Choice - B Tell a story that helps us understand the cell as a system. Use characters and develop a plot, setting, conflict and other literary devices.

81 80 Sample DI Lessons using Triarchic Intelligence: Division Know How division works Understand The importance of division Be able to Apply the principles of division in novel settings

82 81 Sample DI Lessons using Triarchic Intelligence: Division Analytical Your friend needs a really clear step-by-step explanation of how division works. Please create one and use both words and numbers to explain. Practical Show how someone would use division at home, school, and work. Show examples. Creative Find a new way to demonstrate what division is all about and how it works.

83 82 Sample DI Lessons using Triarchic Intelligence: Language Arts Experts suggest that an effective plot has events that: Follow a logical sequence Has compelling characters Has a convincing resolution Your job is to evaluate or create a plot based on these criteria by completing one of the following:

84 83 Analytical choices A.Select a story you believe has an effective plot based on “expert” criteria and provide specific support from the story to defend your position. Or B.Select a story you believe has an effective plot, despite the fact that is violates “expert” criteria, and explain how the author accomplished this.

85 84 Practical choice Make a digital video based on a literary work of your choice. Be sure your story boards fit the criteria for an effective plot and be able to defend your plot line with a narrative, bullet points, or a graphic organizer.

86 85 Creative choice Propose an original story with an effective plot. You may write the story, stroyboard it, or may a flow chart. Then defend your work and prove it has a compelling plot!

87 86 Practicing with Sternberg Using “Handout 14” as a guide: Create three (or more) tasks all built around the same outcome/goal, providing at least one analytical, practical, and creative option. Transfer the template to a transparency. Select a spokesperson to present to the group.

88 87 From Lo to High Prep DI Anchor Activities Stratified questions (Bloom & open-ended) Choice boards Product differentiation (Sternberg & Gardner) Tiering Layered curriculum The parallel curriculum

89 88 Tiering Defined Varied levels of activities are offered to ensure that students explore ideas at a level that builds on their prior knowledge and prompts continued growth. Tomlinson, 1995

90 89 Tiering’s benefits “When a teacher tries to teach something to the entire class at the same time, chances are one-third of the kids already know it; one-third will get it; and the remaining one- third won’t, so two-thirds are wasting their time.” Lilian Katz, cited in ASCD inquiry kit, 1996.

91 90 Tiered Assignments Parallel tasks at varied levels of complexity, depth, and abstractness with various degrees of scaffolding, support or direction All activities are engaging, offer an appropriate level of challenge and respectful Assignment can be based on teacher assessment or student choice

92 91 Tiered Assignments can be “tiered” by: Difficulty –Number of steps to the complete the process –Level of language used Complexity of content (concept) –Lower to higher level of concepts used –Select a template that stratifies difficulty Complexity of process (thinking skills) –Lower to higher level of thinking skills used –See Blooms’ Taxonomy Product (learning style) –Mode of presentation –See Sternberg or Gardner

93 92 Sample DI Lesson: Tiering Know The format and language appropriate for a complaint letter Understand How to use persuasive language effectively Be able to Produce an effective complaint letter in the appropriate format based on a prompt

94 93 Step Two: Pre-assess Imagine you have found a bug in your cheeseburger. Write a complaint letter to McBurgers. From this you discover that all students know how to complain, but: No one knew the proper format About 1/2 knew the appropriate language

95 94 Step Three: Pre-assessment Create folders of effective complaint letters, ineffective letters, and non-complaint letters Ask students to sort the letters into three groups. Check for understanding. Ask students to analyze the key characteristics of the language and format of effective complaint letters.

96 95 Step Four: Layered Complexity Group B (those who get the language, but not the format) Provide a folder containing complaint letters with grade level readability and consistent Format. This is the middle level task

97 96 Be able to do: B Situation: One of the two games you ordered from Super Software - Tomb Raider - came in a ripped package and does not work. The other game - Off Road Adventures - works fine. Your task: Write a complaint letter to Super Software using the information provided. Use the correct language and format, including only the necessary - but sufficient - information.

98 97 Equalize for Struggling Learners Group A students don’t get the language or the format. Therefore their task is Simpler: fewer letters to analyze More concrete: Letters in the folders are easier to read and have consistent, straightforward formats More scaffolding: teacher or designee works more closely with this group as needed

99 98 Be able to do: A Situation: A game you ordered from Super Software - Tomb Raider - came in a ripped package and does not work. Your task: Write a complaint letter to Super Software using the information provided. Use the correct language and format, including only the necessary - but sufficient - information.

100 99 Equalize for advanced students Group C students immediately grasped the format and already had the language. Therefore: Put some distracters in their folder. They should have more complicated and sophisticated letters to analyze and a much “fuzzier” problem to address. They will receive less scaffolding.

101 100 Be able to do: C Situation: You recently ordered a video game system from a software company. The game does not work and you intend to return it. Your task: make up a name and address for the company. Think of all the details you would have to include in your complaint letter and the approach you will take to resolve the issue. Write an effective complaint letter using appropriate language and format.

102 101 Tiered Assessment Tasks for A, B, and C are of different complexity but with the same outcome: How will you assess each group? How will you assess each individual? How will you grade each group? How will you grade each individual? What do parents, students, and administration need to know about this?

103 102 Tiered examples Grade level three, math “patterns.” Know How to tell time to the nearest 5 minute interval and to the nearest minute, using analog and digital clocks. Understand Time follows a pattern. Time helps us organize our lives. Be able to Read the time on an analog clock. Match analog time to digital time. Match the time on an analog clock to it written form. Essential question: Why is being able to tell time important?

104 103 After pre-assessment, groups are formed based on readiness Telling time on the quarter hour and half hour. Telling time at 5 minute intervals. Telling time to the nearest minute. All students build a clock to satisfy their respective tasks. Students who finish early have a Time Memory Game to play as an anchor activity.

105 104 Generic examples of tiering Students work on the same outcome, but with different levels of difficulty (leveled books, for example) Students work on the same content or materials, but different outcomes are expected (students are reading maps, but the tasks are stratified by complexity). Students work on the same topic or themes, but use different materials and/or have different outcomes (in a holocaust unit, different novels are required with choices of varying complexity as a product).

106 105 Practicing tiering http://www.doe.state.in.us/exceptional/gt/tiere d%5fcurriculum/welcome.html Using the website above, the CD ROM, or “Handout 29,” construct a tiered lesson. Transfer the lesson from the template to a transparency. Select a spokesperson to share your product with the class.

107 106 From Lo to High Prep DI Anchor Activities Stratified questions (Bloom & open-ended) Choice boards Product differentiation (Sternberg & Gardner) Tiering Layered curriculum The parallel curriculum

108 107 Layered Curriculum Compatible with Brain Research Aligned with Bloom’s Taxonomy Allows for choice and learning preference Student-centered Creates a defensible and understandable grading structure Nunley, K. www.help4teachers.com

109 108 Layered Grading Template A Layer Critical Thinking B Layer Application C Layer Knowledge

110 109 Layered Grading Template A Layer Critical Thinking B Layer Application C Layer Knowledge

111 110 Layered Curriculum Compatible with Brain Research Aligned with Bloom’s Taxonomy Allows for choice and learning preference Student-centered Creates a defensible and understandable grading structure Nunley, K. www.help4teachers.com

112 111 Layered Grading Template A Layer Critical Thinking B Layer Application C Layer Knowledge

113 112 Layered Grading Template A Layer Critical Thinking B Layer Application C Layer Knowledge

114 113 B LAYER A LAYER C LAYER A ALAYER B LAYER C LAYER Dr Kathie Nunley’s Layered Curriculum  Additional information and support available at: http://Help4Teachers.comhttp://Help4Teachers.com

115 114 C LAYER: Basic rote learning. Facts, vocabulary, skills. Students demonstrate a basic understanding of material. Differentiate instruction - especially in this layer. Offer a wide variety of assignment choices to meet the learning styles and ability of all your students. A LAYER: Critical thinking and analysis of real world issues. A LAYER B LAYER B LAYER: Application of ideas gained in the C layer. Each assignment should reflect a unique student perspective. Dr Kathie Nunley’s Layered Curriculum  Additional information and support available at: http://Help4Teachers.comhttp://Help4Teachers.com

116 115 Layered Curriculum:Sample Plant Unit Level C: Maximum 65 points in this section. Listen to the lecture. Take notes (5 pts daily) Design a poster of the pine tree life cycle (15) Choose one or two worksheets (5 pts each) Do the seed lab&complete the worksheet (10) Read text 1, chapter 12, and do the worksheet (10) Find 10 leaves showing 3 different venations. Make rubbings and label them. (5) Read text 2 and be able to answer questions 9-16 on page 343. Nunley, K. www.help4teachers.com

117 116 Layered Curriculum:Sample Plant Unit Level B: Maximum 15 points. Choose one. –Flower dissection (bring in a flower, dissect and mount individual parts and label them) –Scavenger hunt - see list on board (this requires an outside pass) –Does Miracle-Gro work? Design and implement a lab to prove or disprove your hypothesis Nunley, K. www.help4teachers.com

118 117 Layered Curriculum:Sample Plant Unit Level A: Maximum 20 points. Choose one. Are bio-engineered plants safe to eat? Can we prevent bio-terrorism? Are pesticide on crops safe to eat? Nunley, k. @ www.help4teachers.com

119 118 Practicing with layered curriculum Using the website: www.help4teachers.comwww.help4teachers.com The “Layered Curriculum” workbook, or The examples provided: Create a “mini-unit” with a “C,” “B,” and “A” layer. Make sure you identify the content area, grade level, and essential questions or KUD’s


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