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Picture Books By: Esther, Sabud and Katie. What Is a Picture Book? What Is a Picture Book?

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Presentation on theme: "Picture Books By: Esther, Sabud and Katie. What Is a Picture Book? What Is a Picture Book?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Picture Books By: Esther, Sabud and Katie

2 What Is a Picture Book? What Is a Picture Book?

3 What is a picture book? “A book in which the illustrations play a significant role in the story telling”

4 Types of Picture Books Baby Books: (infants/young toddlers) lullabies or nursery rhymes. Generally does not contain any words.

5 Types of Picture Books Toddler Books: (ages 1-3) simple short stories that contain concepts that are familiar and relatable to the young child. Generally used for early counting, shapes, colors, etc. Printed in several formats such as board books, pop-up, lift- flap, and books that contain textures or sounds.

6 Types of Picture Books Picture Story Books: (Ages 4-8) Plots are simplified, with very few characters. Illustrations begin to play a significant role in the story telling.

7 Types of Picture Books Early Readers: (Ages 6-8) “easy to read” books that contain around 2-5 sentences per page with an illustration on every page.

8 Types of Picture Books Transition Books: (Ages 6-9) the beginning of chapter books. More text per page and generally limited illustrations in black and white provided on every several pages.

9 History of Picture Books One of the precursor books to children’s picture books was a book called Les Jeux et Plaisis de L’efrance or The Games and Pleasures of Childhood illustrated by Jacques Stella (1657). Although produced for children, the pictures depict children in an unnatural form and more as miniature adults.

10 History of Picture Books Orbis Sensualium Pictus or The Visible World of Pictures by John Amos Comenius (1659) was an encyclopedia with pictures of the natural world. The author was innovative in the sense that he understood that there was a difference between adults and children. Some historians view this text as the first picture book for children and it is also viewed as a precursor to illustrated textbooks.

11 History of Picture Books Randolph Caldecott ( ) was the first to view the importance of illustration in a picture book as a means for storytelling, rather than mere decoration to be added to a text. He put just as much of a value on the illustrations of a story as he did to the text.

12 History of Picture Books The late 19 th century and early 20 th century, with the help of innovations in color printing, led to a tremendous growth in the popularity of colored pictured books. There was also a growing understanding in the importance and need for children’s literature. Additionally, the wars during this time helped lead to the need for escapism through these colored books.

13 History of Picture Books In the 1960’s there began to be the use of vibrant colors and paintings in picture books with the help of many artists and illustrators who began to take on careers as picture book authors to make a living. One illustrator who did so was Maurice Sendak who made an impact on the picture book world with his work Where the Wild Things Are.

14 History of Picture Books Over recent years that has been debate over what should be depicted in picture books. Some argue that pictures books should be pushing the boundaries and discussing adult topics such as politics, sex, violence, grief etc. because the vibrant pictures appeal to adults as well. Others argue that picture books should remain child friendly. No Time to Play By Sandra Arenal (2004) is one book that has pushed those boundaries by discussing child laborers in Mexico.

15 How can we use picture books in class? Look at the picture book you brought. Take 1 minute to brainstorm an activity you could use in class. Share out!

16 A Successful Read Aloud Divide the text into smaller units (so you can better develop new vocabulary and comprehension) Divide the text into smaller units (so you can better develop new vocabulary and comprehension) Complete the book within 3-5 daysComplete the book within 3-5 days Review important or challenging vocabulary on the day after the last passage is readReview important or challenging vocabulary on the day after the last passage is read Duration of 30 minutes for each sessionDuration of 30 minutes for each session

17 Day-by-Day Breakdown

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19 Remember to… Activate student’s background knowledge to help build story content (this will also support comprehension and vocabulary retention) Activate student’s background knowledge to help build story content (this will also support comprehension and vocabulary retention) Integrate teaching word meanings WITH the content area rather than a separate list of words and definitions Integrate teaching word meanings WITH the content area rather than a separate list of words and definitions Don’t forget to address vocabulary that is difficult to visualize (abstract words/modifiers) Don’t forget to address vocabulary that is difficult to visualize (abstract words/modifiers) Guided reading discussions with students that have higher-level responses for vocabulary, structure and use Guided reading discussions with students that have higher-level responses for vocabulary, structure and use Use culturally relevant texts AND texts that incorporate parts of students’ life experiences to help them build their comprehension and retention of the new concepts/vocabulary taught Use culturally relevant texts AND texts that incorporate parts of students’ life experiences to help them build their comprehension and retention of the new concepts/vocabulary taught

20 Let’s See it in Action! Watch this video to see how the teacher hits on each tip for successful. video Think about how she… activates students background knowledge activates students background knowledge integrates word meaning into her read aloud integrates word meaning into her read aloud visually represents the words visually represents the words creates a guided discussion creates a guided discussion

21 Activities to Engage Students

22 Sources to Find Picture Books Top 25 Picture Books By Scholastic Top 25 Picture Books By Scholastic 2013 Newberry Award Winners 2013 Newberry Award Winners 2013 NYPL 2013 NYPL Teaching Channel – Picture Books Picture BooksPicture Books Eric Carle Museum - https://www.carlemuseum.org

23 Backes, L. (2014, February). Understanding children's book genres. Write for Kids. Retrieved February 5, 2014, from Burlingham, C. (1997). Picturing childhood: the evolution of the illustrated children's book. University of California. Retrieved February 5, 2014, from Hickman, P., Pollard-Durodola, S., & Vaughn, S. (2004). Storybook reading: Improving vocabulary and comprehension for English-language learners. International Reading Association, Popova, M. (2012, February 24). A brief history of children's picture books and the art of visual storytelling. Brain Pickings. Retrived February 5, 2014, from picturebooks/http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/02/24/childrens- picturebooks/ References


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