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Differentiating Instruction- An Overview - Part 2 Presented by Lillie Stone, Director of Differentiated Learning & MAP Linda Blankenhorn, SETRC Professional.

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Presentation on theme: "Differentiating Instruction- An Overview - Part 2 Presented by Lillie Stone, Director of Differentiated Learning & MAP Linda Blankenhorn, SETRC Professional."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Differentiating Instruction- An Overview - Part 2 Presented by Lillie Stone, Director of Differentiated Learning & MAP Linda Blankenhorn, SETRC Professional Development Specialist

3 Differentiating Instruction- An Overview - Part 2 Please take a moment to complete the “Readiness for Differentiation Checklist”

4 “Stop asking me if we’re almost there! We’re nomads, for crying out loud!”

5 C.Hanford Henderson The dreadful uniformity in modern education …as now carried on is a doubtful blessing, a barrier to progress instead of a help. We don’t want people uniform – not even if they were all as nice as one’s self.

6 Group Activity “What Stuck?” In a round robin, discuss the following questions: (You will be given 10 minutes) What does differentiation involve? How does the differentiated classroom differ from the traditional classroom? –Role of the teacher –Role of the student –Use of time, space and materials Your group will have 20 minutes to design a chart, map, illustration, etc. which best reflects the groups’ discussion.

7 Carousel Feedback Your group will stand in front of your chart. At the signal, move clockwise to the next chart. Using your sticky notes, you will be given 3 minutes to view, reflect and leave a comment, suggestion or question on the chart. At the signal, move the next chart. Follow the same procedure. When you arrive back at your own chart you can review the notes left for you. You will be given 3 minutes to respond to any comments or suggestions others may have left.

8 Why Differentiate? “One size fits all” instruction does not address the needs of many students. Kids come in different shapes and sizes as well as interests, learning profiles, and readiness levels.

9 Differentiated Instruction Is... A way of thinking about and organizing teaching and learning. Is Not... A new idea or an instructional strategy.

10 Differentiated Instruction Is … All students are exposed to key concepts, but at differing levels of complexity and depth. Is Not... Individualized instruction

11 Differentiated Instruction Is... On-going assessment and adjustment of instruction. Teacher guiding the exploration of a subject; teacher as coordinator of time, space and materials. Is Not... Tests at the end of the chapter to see “who got it”. Teacher as primary provider of information.

12 Differentiated Instruction Is... Learning organized around key concepts, themes, common elements. Multiple approaches to content, process and product designed to encourage maximal growth in all students. Is Not… Fragmented teaching of unrelated skills. One size fits all instruction.

13 Differentiated Instruction Is... All students engaged in challenging and respectful tasks. Flexible grouping including working alone, in pairs, student-selected groups, whole class, cooperative groups. Is Not... Giving some students “watered” down tasks and others more of the same work to do. A way to track students or make homogeneous groups.

14 Differentiated Instruction Is... Designing learning experiences based on student readiness, interest and learning profile. Is Not... Every student completing the same work at the same time in the same way.

15 “In differentiated classrooms, teachers begin where students are, not the front of a curriculum guide.” Teachers in differentiated classrooms are students of their students. Carol Tomlinson

16 Differentiation of Instruction is a teacher’s response to learners’ needs guided by general principles of differentiation such as: respectful tasksflexible groupingongoing assessment and adjustment teachers can differentiate Content Process Product according to students’ Readiness Interests Learning Profile through a range of instructional and management strategies such as:

17 Strategies That Support Differentiation Maxi-StrategiesMini-Strategies Assessment & Diagnosis Flexible Grouping Tiered Activities Anchor Activities Differentiated Learning Centers Curriculum Compacting Learning Contracts Adjusting Questions Independent Study Reading & Study Buddies Student or Adult Mentors Exit Cards Task Cards Student Expert Desks Three Before Me The Dr. Is In Mini-Lessons Multiple Texts Interest Surveys

18 “Creating a differentiated classroom is not a yes/no proposition but rather a continuum along which teachers move as they develop skills of responsive teaching.” Carol Ann Tomlinson

19 ACTIVITY Use these questions to guide your discussion on the information you will read/view: How does the differentiated classroom differ from the traditional classroom? What are some key elements of the differentiated classroom? How was instruction differentiated? (content, process, product) How were students grouped? (by readiness, interests, learning styles) Questions, concerns, observations

20 Key Principles of a Differentiated Classroom The teacher is clear about what matters in the content area. The teacher understands, appreciates, and builds upon student differences. Assessment & instruction are inseparable. All students participate in respectful work. Students and teachers are collaborators in learning.

21 Key Principles of a Differentiated Classroom The teacher adjusts content, process, & product in response to student readiness, interests, and learning profile. Goals are maximum growth and continued success. Flexibility is the hallmark of a differentiated classroom.

22 Assessment & Diagnosis Flexible Grouping Tiered Activities Anchor Activities Differentiated Centers Curriculum Compacting Learning Contracts Adjusting Questions Independent Study Not Differentiated Fully Differentiated Reactive Fixed Closed Proactive Fluid Open “One size fits all.”

23 A Continuum of Differentiated Classrooms Level 1 –Implied or stated philosophy that all of the students need same teaching/learning. –Class works as a whole on most exercises, projects –Class uses same materials, text –Teacher in control of content and pacing –Group grading standard

24 A Continuum of Differentiated Classrooms Level 2 Implied or stated belief that all students need the same information, however takes student differences into account when planning Assess prior knowledge at group level May identify 2/3 instructional levels at the beginning of the year and will group students accordingly. Uses whole and small group instruction with same content May modify some tasks for some students Provides for student interests in optional activities Student work graded by rubric or against group norm.

25 A Continuum of Differentiated Classrooms Level 3 –Implied or state belief in student differences in learning –Encouraging students to take an assignment further –Implied variations in grading expectations –Students choose own work groups –Early finishers can read, do puzzles, choose an activity to keep busy –Occasional exceptions to standard pacing. May not need to show all work –Grading reflects student’s individual ability.

26 A Continuum of Differentiated Classrooms Level 4 –Articulated philosophy of student differences –Planned assessment, tiering of assignments, compacting of material –Variable pacing –Varied group configurations based on teacher assessment –Planned variations in content, process and product –Individual goal setting –Grading to reflect individual growth/progress –Mentoring

27 Final thoughts…. Have fun. Start small. Keep it simple. Just do it!!!

28 For more information: Gardner, H. (1991). The unschooled mind. How children think and how school should teach. New York:Basic Books. Gardner, H (1993). Multiple intelligences: The theory in practice. New York:Basic Books. Tomlinson,C. (1995). Deciding to differentiate instruction in the middle school: One school’s journey. Gifted Child Quarterly, 39, Tomlinson, C. (1995). How to differentiate instruction in mixed ability classrooms. Alexandria, VA:ASCD. Tomlinson, C. (1996). Differentiating Instruction for mixed-ability classrooms. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Tomlinson, C. (1997). Differentiating Instruction: Facilitator’s guide. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Tomlinson, C. (1999). The differentiated classroom: Responding to the needs of all learners. Alexandria, VA:ASCD Web: Type in Differentiated Instruction

29 Thank you for your attention this afternoon. Before you leave today… Please fill out an evaluation form. Pass it to the front. BLUEPlace the BLUE dot from your folder on the graph so that it bests represents where your knowledge of differentiation is right now.


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