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Emilie Du Châtelet By Justin Lee. Early Life Born in Paris on December 17 1706, into a wealthy lifestyle as Gabrielle Emilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil.

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Presentation on theme: "Emilie Du Châtelet By Justin Lee. Early Life Born in Paris on December 17 1706, into a wealthy lifestyle as Gabrielle Emilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil."— Presentation transcript:

1 Emilie Du Châtelet By Justin Lee

2 Early Life Born in Paris on December , into a wealthy lifestyle as Gabrielle Emilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil. Received education that most women of her time did not even think of having. Dedicated her life to science.

3 Love Life She married Marquise Florent – Claude du Chastellet in June of She married Marquise Florent – Claude du Chastellet in June of Bored three children by him. Bored three children by him. That did not stop Émilie from having multiple relationships with men, including tutors and friends like Voltaire. That did not stop Émilie from having multiple relationships with men, including tutors and friends like Voltaire. Strangely enough, her husband did not seem to mind it so much. Strangely enough, her husband did not seem to mind it so much.

4 Challenges and Disappointments Fought for her right as a women to discuss with men about ideas of math and science. Fought for her right as a women to discuss with men about ideas of math and science. Had many aspirations which includes to have the same standards of men when it came to studying sciences. Had many aspirations which includes to have the same standards of men when it came to studying sciences. Émilie was rejected by scholarly institution and men from higher education in academic schools because she was a woman. Émilie was rejected by scholarly institution and men from higher education in academic schools because she was a woman. She was always denied to sit in the King's library at the Louvre because she was female. She was always denied to sit in the King's library at the Louvre because she was female. She was also denied entrance into the Gradot's coffeehouse when mathematic men scholars were disusing the latest science information. She was also denied entrance into the Gradot's coffeehouse when mathematic men scholars were disusing the latest science information. One day she dressed like a man and even though the men knew who she was, they allowed her in for discussion. One day she dressed like a man and even though the men knew who she was, they allowed her in for discussion.

5 Emilie and her Tutors Emilie not only refused to give up mathematics but she engaged the best known tutors to help her in her study. Emilie not only refused to give up mathematics but she engaged the best known tutors to help her in her study. She also conquered the heart of Voltaire, one of most intriguing and brilliant scholars of this time. Some of Emilie's most significant work came from the period she spent with Voltaire at Cirey-sur-Blaise. For the two scholars this was a safe and quiet haven distant from the turbulence of Paris and court life. She also conquered the heart of Voltaire, one of most intriguing and brilliant scholars of this time. Some of Emilie's most significant work came from the period she spent with Voltaire at Cirey-sur-Blaise. For the two scholars this was a safe and quiet haven distant from the turbulence of Paris and court life. As Voltaire notes "We long employed all our attention and powers upon Leibniz and Newton; Mme du Châtelet attached herself first to Leibniz, and explained one part of his system in a book exceedingly well written, entitled Institutions de physique". However she soon abandoned the work of Leibniz and applied herself to the discoveries of the great Newton. As Voltaire notes "We long employed all our attention and powers upon Leibniz and Newton; Mme du Châtelet attached herself first to Leibniz, and explained one part of his system in a book exceedingly well written, entitled Institutions de physique". However she soon abandoned the work of Leibniz and applied herself to the discoveries of the great Newton. She was extremely successful in translating his entire book on the principles of mathematics into French. She also added to this book an "Algebraic Commentary" which very few general readers understood. She was extremely successful in translating his entire book on the principles of mathematics into French. She also added to this book an "Algebraic Commentary" which very few general readers understood.

6 Samuel Koenig vs. Emilie Du Châtelet As a student her curiosity and stubbornness caused her to place impossible demands on her tutors. As Lynn Osen notes, "Her swift mind outpaced them, her irregular hours disrupted their lives, her rigorous questions were frequently impossible to answer." Such behavior caused her to get into a dispute with another of her tutors, Samuel Koenig, about the subject of the infinitely small. This dispute subsequently ended their friendship and association with one another.

7 Samuel Koenig vs. Emilie Du Châtelet (cont’d) In 1740 when Emilie's book Institutions de physique was published, Koenig started a rumor that the work was merely a rehash of his lessons with her. Of course this infuriated Emilie and for help she turned to the Academy of Sciences and Maupertuis, with whom she had discussed these ideas long before she engaged Koenig as her tutor. In 1740 when Emilie's book Institutions de physique was published, Koenig started a rumor that the work was merely a rehash of his lessons with her. Of course this infuriated Emilie and for help she turned to the Academy of Sciences and Maupertuis, with whom she had discussed these ideas long before she engaged Koenig as her tutor. The knowledgeable scientists of the time were aware of her capabilities of performing the work. However she did not feel that she had received the support she deserved. This was the first time she felt that being a woman really worked against her. The knowledgeable scientists of the time were aware of her capabilities of performing the work. However she did not feel that she had received the support she deserved. This was the first time she felt that being a woman really worked against her.

8 Emilie’s Newest Pride and Joy In early September of 1749, she gave birth to a baby girl. In early September of 1749, she gave birth to a baby girl. For several days, Emilie seemed happy and content. For several days, Emilie seemed happy and content.

9 Emilie’s Joy Cut Short. On September 10, 1749 she died suddenly, however. On September 10, 1749 she died suddenly, however. Emilie's death was soon followed by the death of the baby girl. Emilie's death was soon followed by the death of the baby girl. As Osen notes, "Voltaire, who was with her at the end, was distraught in tears. He stumbled from the room and fell at the outside door.” Emilie died at the age of forty-three. As Osen notes, "Voltaire, who was with her at the end, was distraught in tears. He stumbled from the room and fell at the outside door.” Emilie died at the age of forty-three. As many authors note, during the course of her short life, Emilie was a truly unique woman and scholar. As many authors note, during the course of her short life, Emilie was a truly unique woman and scholar. Emilie died at the age of forty-three. Emilie died at the age of forty-three.

10 Greatest Achievements Among her greatest achievements were her Institutions du physique and the translation of Newton's Principia, which was published after her death along with a "Preface historique" by Voltaire. Among her greatest achievements were her Institutions du physique and the translation of Newton's Principia, which was published after her death along with a "Preface historique" by Voltaire. She managed to maintain her confidence and position in Paris society while pursuing her love for mathematics. She managed to maintain her confidence and position in Paris society while pursuing her love for mathematics. Emilie du Châtelet was one of many women whose contributions have helped shape the course of mathematics. Emilie du Châtelet was one of many women whose contributions have helped shape the course of mathematics.

11 Other Achievements Oedipus Rex - a translation from the Greek into French. Oedipus Rex - a translation from the Greek into French The Elements of the Philosophy of Newton edition The Elements of the Philosophy of Newton edition.

12 References Learning Technology Team of Sheffield Hallam University. “Emily du Chatelet [1706 – 1709].” UK Centre for Women in Science, Engineering, and Technology. (1995 – 2000) (18 December 2005). Learning Technology Team of Sheffield Hallam University. “Emily du Chatelet [1706 – 1709].” UK Centre for Women in Science, Engineering, and Technology. (1995 – 2000) (18 December 2005). O’Connor, John F. and Robertson, Edmund F. “Gabrielle Emilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil Marquise du Châtelet.” The MacTutor History of Mathematics archive. (April 2003) (18 December 2005). O’Connor, John F. and Robertson, Edmund F. “Gabrielle Emilie Le Tonnelier de Breteuil Marquise du Châtelet.” The MacTutor History of Mathematics archive. (April 2003) (18 December 2005).http://www-groups.dcs.st- and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Chatelet.htmlhttp://www-groups.dcs.st- and.ac.uk/~history/Mathematicians/Chatelet.html Richardson, William H. “Emilie, Marquise du Chatelet.” Wichita State University Department of Mathematics and Statistics: Math 750J History Project. (1999 and 2000) (18 December 2005). Richardson, William H. “Emilie, Marquise du Chatelet.” Wichita State University Department of Mathematics and Statistics: Math 750J History Project. (1999 and 2000) (18 December 2005). Birkenstock, Jane M. “Emilie du Chatelet.” Chateau du Cirey – Residence of Voltaire. ( ) (18 December 2005). Birkenstock, Jane M. “Emilie du Chatelet.” Chateau du Cirey – Residence of Voltaire. ( ) (18 December 2005).


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