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Webb’s Depth of Knowledge. Norman L. Webb, University of Wisconsin Began 1997 Complexity of both content and task required Curriculum & Instruction/Educational.

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Presentation on theme: "Webb’s Depth of Knowledge. Norman L. Webb, University of Wisconsin Began 1997 Complexity of both content and task required Curriculum & Instruction/Educational."— Presentation transcript:

1 Webb’s Depth of Knowledge

2 Norman L. Webb, University of Wisconsin Began 1997 Complexity of both content and task required Curriculum & Instruction/Educational Technologies Department (610)

3 Depth of Knowledge Classification of cognitive complexity – Nominative rather than taxonomy – Not about easy vs. difficult – Verb and it’s context Considers complexity of both content and task required – Content: simple vs. complex data displays – Task: solving routine vs. non-routine problems using those data displays Curriculum & Instruction/Educational Technologies Department (610)

4 Depth of Knowledge “The DOK level describes the kind of thinking involved in the task, not whether it will be completed correctly. A greater DOK level requires greater conceptual understanding and cognitive processing by the students. Therefore, on average, students who reach greater DOK levels more regularly will have increased student achievement.” Marconi, Smith, and Lombardi; “Depth of Knowledge: An Effective Tool for Education Students” in Shop Talk Vol. 4, No. 2 Spring 2009, The Southern Nevada Regional Professional Development Program. Curriculum & Instruction/Educational Technologies Department (610)

5 Why Depth of Knowledge? To ensure that the intent of the standard and the level of student demonstration required by that standard matches the assessment items (required under NCLB) To assist in teaching to a level that will promote student achievement Curriculum & Instruction/Educational Technologies Department (610)

6 DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE - Level One Recall and Reproduction requires recall of information, such as a fact, definition, term, or simple procedure, as well as performing a simple process or procedure. Level 1 problems involve only one step. A student answering a Level 1 item either knows the answer or does not: that is, the answer does not need to be “figured out” or “solved.” Curriculum & Instruction/Educational Technologies Department (610)

7 DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE - Level Two Skills and Concepts/Basic Reasoning includes the engagement of some mental processing beyond recalling or reproducing a response. The content knowledge or process involved is more complex. These actions imply more than one step. Level 2 activities include making observations and collecting data. Curriculum & Instruction/Educational Technologies Department (610)

8 DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE - Level Three Strategic Thinking/Complex Reasoning requires deep knowledge using reasoning, planning, using evidence, and a higher level of thinking than the previous two levels. The cognitive demands at Level 3 are complex and abstract. The multi-step task requires more demanding reasoning. In most instances, requiring students to explain their thinking is at Level 3. Other Level 3 activities include drawing conclusions from observations; citing evidence and developing a logical argument for concepts; explaining phenomena in terms of concepts; and using concepts to solve non-routine problems. Curriculum & Instruction/Educational Technologies Department (610)

9 DEPTH OF KNOWLEDGE - Level Four Extended Thinking/Reasoning requires high cognitive demand and is very complex. Students are required to make several connections – relate ideas within the content area or among content areas – and have to select or devise one approach among many alternatives on how the situation can be solved. Performance assessments and open- ended/constructed response assessment activities requiring significant thought will be Level 4. Curriculum & Instruction/Educational Technologies Department (610)

10 Depth of Knowledge Level 1 Level 1 — Identify this utensil. Level 2 Level 2 — Explain the function of the fork. Level 3 Level 3 — Identify two examples of when a fork would not be the best utensil for a type of food and explain why. Level 4 Level 4 — Design an investigation to determine the optimal number and length of tines for a salad fork. From: Lois Barnes SREB/HSTW Curriculum & Instruction/Educational Technologies Department (610)

11 Level 1 Level 1 — Identify the type of tree. Level 2 Level 2 — Explain the function of the leaves. Level 3 Level 3 — Explain how a drought might affect the growth of the tree. Level 4 Level 4 — Design an investigation of seedling growth to determine the best fertilizer for this type of tree. Depth of Knowledge Curriculum & Instruction/Educational Technologies Department (610)


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