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YL Material Design & Development Week 3 Tomlinson’s Introduction Halliwell’s Young Learners.

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Presentation on theme: "YL Material Design & Development Week 3 Tomlinson’s Introduction Halliwell’s Young Learners."— Presentation transcript:

1 YL Material Design & Development Week 3 Tomlinson’s Introduction Halliwell’s Young Learners

2 Attendance and homework  Check Tomlinson’s homework

3 Homework for Next Week  Read and answer the questions to Paul’s “Child Centered Learning” p. 173 (Qs) pp (reading)

4 Halliwell’s Young Learners  Discuss the homework in small groups or with a partner

5 Discussing Halliwell  Can you think of examples of how children are good at:  Interpreting meaning  Using language creatively  Learning indirectly  Having fun  Using their imagination  No fear of talking/Desire for interaction  Can you think of examples of how children are good at:  Interpreting meaning  Using language creatively  Learning indirectly  Having fun  Using their imagination  No fear of talking/Desire for interaction

6 Discussing Halliwell  The author talks about content and attitude goals;  What are content and attitude goals  Why does the author say attitude goals are to prioritized?

7 Discussing Haliwell  Summarize the following in your groups  Special nature of language (2.2)  Checking understanding (2.3)  Treating Mistakes (2.4)  Real exchanges (2.5)  Teaching in the target language (2.6)  Summarize the following in your groups  Special nature of language (2.2)  Checking understanding (2.3)  Treating Mistakes (2.4)  Real exchanges (2.5)  Teaching in the target language (2.6)

8 Questions about Tomlinson? Which of the 16 features of good materials do you have questions about?

9 YL Class Results #Class DClass E#Class DClass E

10 1.Materials should achieve impact 2.Materials should help learners to feel at ease 3.Materials should help learners develop confidence 4.What is being taught should be perceived as relevant and useful 5.Materials should facilitate learner self-investment and discovery 6.Learners must be ready to acquire the points being taught 7.Materials should expose the learners to language in authentic use 8.Learner’s attention should be drawn to the linguistic features of the input 9.Materials should provided opportunities to use the TL for communicative purposes 10.Materials should take into account that the positive effects of instruction are usually delayed 11.Materials should take into account that learners have different learning styles 12.Materials should take into account that learners differ in affective attitude 13.Materials should permit a silent period at the beginning of instruction 14.Materials should maximize learning potential 15.Materials should not rely too much on controlled practice 16.Materials should provide opportunities for outcome feedback

11 1. Materials should achieve impact

12 2. Materials should help learners to feel at ease  Use lots of white space  illustrations that learners can relate to  balance Ss academic and emotional needs, so….  materials seem helpful rather than test like  use active voice rather than passive  Concrete examples and stories that connect to Ss and real world  Language should be inclusive  It’s the learner’s language, too! The Target Language shouldn’t make Ss feel inferior  Use lots of white space  illustrations that learners can relate to  balance Ss academic and emotional needs, so….  materials seem helpful rather than test like  use active voice rather than passive  Concrete examples and stories that connect to Ss and real world  Language should be inclusive  It’s the learner’s language, too! The Target Language shouldn’t make Ss feel inferior

13 Build rapport by sharing aspects of yourself

14 3. Materials should help learners develop confidence  Challenge level (i+1)  Staging and task sequencing  Removing scaffolding and support language  Success builds success and success = confidence  Challenge level (i+1)  Staging and task sequencing  Removing scaffolding and support language  Success builds success and success = confidence

15 4. What is being taught should be perceived as relevant and useful  Find out what your Ss like and want to learn through needs analysis  Make task and activities “real” & “meaningful”  Allow for Ss personalization of learning  Use games and competitions to create materials that seem relevant  Find out what your Ss like and want to learn through needs analysis  Make task and activities “real” & “meaningful”  Allow for Ss personalization of learning  Use games and competitions to create materials that seem relevant

16 5. Materials should facilitate learner self-investment and discovery  Learning situations are often implicit  Inductive methods are used  Learner-centered, task-based, learn by doing  Ss-Ss collaboration and peer learning maximized  Teacher Talk Time (TTT) minimized  Learning situations are often implicit  Inductive methods are used  Learner-centered, task-based, learn by doing  Ss-Ss collaboration and peer learning maximized  Teacher Talk Time (TTT) minimized

17  Classroom that facilitate learner self- investment and discovery often look like this.  Where’s the teacher?  Present, but not directly involved.

18 6. Learners must be ready to acquire the points being taught  Materials are developed so teachers can easily do initial and ongoing assessment  Materials are created with the understanding that Ss learn at different rates, and not all Ss are necessarily ready to acquire what is being taught  Developmental sequence is taken into account  Materials are developed so teachers can easily do initial and ongoing assessment  Materials are created with the understanding that Ss learn at different rates, and not all Ss are necessarily ready to acquire what is being taught  Developmental sequence is taken into account

19 Developmental Sequence The developmental sequence for L2 learners learning English is very similar to the developmental sequence for L1 learners of English. We learn basic words and phrases before learning more complex ones. The developmental sequence for L2 learners learning English is very similar to the developmental sequence for L1 learners of English. We learn basic words and phrases before learning more complex ones.

20 7. Materials should expose the learners to language in authentic use  Authentic Input: listening and reading texts created by native speakers for native speakers  Authentic Output: Tasks and activities that have a real context of use  Authentic Input: listening and reading texts created by native speakers for native speakers  Authentic Output: Tasks and activities that have a real context of use

21 8. Learner’s attention should be drawn to the linguistic features of the input  Meaning before form  Materials help students to notice gap in interlanguage  Introduce key points/features many times to assure that Ss notice and acquire  Use enhanced input techniques to drawn Ss attention to features of input  Schema activation  Meaning before form  Materials help students to notice gap in interlanguage  Introduce key points/features many times to assure that Ss notice and acquire  Use enhanced input techniques to drawn Ss attention to features of input  Schema activation

22 Enhanced Input  Jane plan s to marry Tom.  She like s Tom, but Tom does n’t like her.  Tom always run s when he see s her.  She catch es Tom.  Tom fall s in love.  It end s happily.  Jane plan s to marry Tom.  She like s Tom, but Tom does n’t like her.  Tom always run s when he see s her.  She catch es Tom.  Tom fall s in love.  It end s happily. What do I want my Ss to notice? How is their attention drawn to the input?

23 Schema Theory & Schema Activation  schema activation - preparing Students to learn new concept or vocabulary  The brain works like a computer with folders and files  People use schemata to organize knowledge and provide a framework for future understanding.  schema activation - preparing Students to learn new concept or vocabulary  The brain works like a computer with folders and files  People use schemata to organize knowledge and provide a framework for future understanding.

24 9. Materials should provided opportunities to use the TL for communicative purposes  Information and opinion gaps  Surveys  Mingle activities  Information and opinion gaps  Surveys  Mingle activities

25 10. Materials should take into account that the positive effects of instruction are usually delayed  Give students multiple chances to use previously taught language and structures  Peer learning – let students teach each other  Extensive reading  This goes beyond lesson planning = unit planning  Give students multiple chances to use previously taught language and structures  Peer learning – let students teach each other  Extensive reading  This goes beyond lesson planning = unit planning

26 11. Materials should take into account that learners have different learning styles  This will be discussed in detail later in the lesson.

27 12. Materials should take into account that learners differ in affective attitude  provide choice of texts, activities  provide optional extras for highly motivated learners  Discuss the value of learning English & feelings about the course and materials  cultural sensitivity  give Ss opportunities to connect topics to lives  provide roles for reluctant learners  provide choice of texts, activities  provide optional extras for highly motivated learners  Discuss the value of learning English & feelings about the course and materials  cultural sensitivity  give Ss opportunities to connect topics to lives  provide roles for reluctant learners

28 13. Materials should permit a silent period at the beginning of instruction  Input before output  Peer learning (in TL or L1 to learn TL)  Use TPR (Total Physical Response)  Respond to Qs by using visuals  Input before output  Peer learning (in TL or L1 to learn TL)  Use TPR (Total Physical Response)  Respond to Qs by using visuals

29 14. Materials should maximize learning potential Left Brain  uses logic  detail oriented  facts rule  words and language  present and past  math and science  can comprehend  Knowing  Acknowledges  order/pattern perception  knows object name Left Brain  uses logic  detail oriented  facts rule  words and language  present and past  math and science  can comprehend  Knowing  Acknowledges  order/pattern perception  knows object name Right Brain  uses feeling  "big picture" oriented  imagination rules  symbols and images  present and future  philosophy & religion  can "get it" (i.e. meaning)  believes  appreciates  spatial perception  knows object function

30 15. Materials should not rely too much on controlled practice  Opportunities for meaningful use  Remove scaffolding/support  Allow personalization and creativity  Opportunities for meaningful use  Remove scaffolding/support  Allow personalization and creativity

31 16. Materials should provide opportunities for outcome feedback  Feedback is important for students, especially if they aren’t successful in communicating.  Just correcting them is  Feedback is important for students, especially if they aren’t successful in communicating.  Just correcting them is


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