Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Monitoring living and working conditions in the European Union Robert Anderson Eurofound Centre for Workforce Futures Macquarie University, Sydney 20 September.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Monitoring living and working conditions in the European Union Robert Anderson Eurofound Centre for Workforce Futures Macquarie University, Sydney 20 September."— Presentation transcript:

1 Monitoring living and working conditions in the European Union Robert Anderson Eurofound Centre for Workforce Futures Macquarie University, Sydney 20 September 2013

2 A decentralised agency of the EU established in 1975 Administered by a Governing Board  composed of national representatives of the social partners, national governments and the European Commission Generates policy-relevant research and findings which contribute to improving the quality of work and life in Europe, through:  Comparative research and analysis of developments affecting living and working conditions  Monitoring of trends in living and working conditions  Identification of emerging issues European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions

3 3 Monitoring living and working conditions: Surveys and Network of observatories European Company Survey (ECS) 2004; 2009; 2013 European Working Conditions Survey (EWCS) 1990/91; 1995/96; 2000; 2005; 2010; 2015 European Quality of Life Survey (EQLS) 2003; 2007; 2011/12; 2016

4 4 Eurofound surveys: country coverage Survey# of countriesCountries European Quality of Life Survey 34 (2011/2012) EU27 CC6: Croatia, Iceland, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, Turkey; IPA: Kosovo European Working Conditions Survey 34 (2010) EU27 CC3 (Croatia, Macedonia, Turkey) IPA3 (Albania, Kosovo, Montenegro) Norway European Company Survey 32 (2013) EU27 CC (Croatia, Iceland, Macedonia, Montenegro, Turkey)

5 Survey implementation Eurofound develops questionnaires Questionnaire translation and fieldwork tendered out Tender specifications: balance between prescribing ‘best practice’ and inviting contractors to outline merits of their approach Explicit quality assurance plan to accompany tender Main difficulties  Limited number of potential contractors  Multi-level management structure (contractor and sub- contractors)  Budgetary constraints 01/09/20145

6 1.Planning: using a systematic Quality Control Framework developed specifically for each survey 2.Consultation: experts and users of the survey participate in the development of the questionnaire, concepts and methodology 3.Transparency: opening up the process both internally and externally 4.Documentation: keeping track of everything, making sure that interventions can be traced back 5.Assessment of the quality of the process and output: EF surveys subscribe to the quality criteria of European Statistical System. External quality assessments are carried out after each round. 01/09/20146 Key elements of the quality assurance strategy for Eurofound surveys

7 Extensive quality control Careful selection of sampling frames  Separate enumeration in case of random route State-of-the-art procedures for questionnaire translation Explicit procedures for respondent selection Experienced, well trained field force Systematic monitoring as well as local spot checks of fieldwork Elaborate procedures for coding and data cleaning External data quality assessment 01/09/20147

8 Five waves: 1991, 1995, 2000, 2005 and th EWCS - 34 countries: EU27, NO, TR, HR, MK, MO, AL, XK Employees and self-employed (15+; ILO definition)  Register based stratified random sampling Random routes if no register available Stratification by urbanisation and region interviews  interviews per country  Response rate (RR3) 44.2% (between 31.3% (ES) and 73.5% (LV)) 40 minute ‘face to face’ interviews at peoples’ homes 2010: 25 language versions of same questionnaire 01/09/20148 European Working Conditions Survey

9 Core surveyed aspects of working conditions working time, pay work organisation precarious employment work-related health risks cognitive and psychosocial factors work-life balance access to training leadership styles worker participation European Working Conditions Survey EWCS 2010: 120 questions 288 items

10 Selected highlights from European Working Conditions Survey 01/09/

11 Exposure to physical risks (at least one quarter of the time) EWCS, 2010

12 Exposure to physical risks,

13 1.High demands and work intensity 2.Emotional demands 3.Lack of autonomy 4.Ethical conflicts 5.Poor social relationships 6.Job and work insecurity 01/09/ Psychosocial risks

14 Work intensity is measured using three questions  The number of determinants of the pace of work  Frequency of having to work at high speed  Frequency of having to work to tight deadlines Work intensity increased over the last two decades but the increase slowed down since % of workers report to be working to tight deadlines and 59% of workers report to be working at high speed (almost) all of the time 01/09/ High demands and work intensity

15 Ability to change or choose  Order of tasks  Speed or rate of work  Method of work 53% of workers control all these aspects Autonomy increases with age On aggregate, men and women do not differ 01/09/ Lack of autonomy

16 01/09/ Work intensity and job autonomy by sector and occupation, EU27

17 Research on job quality Job level characteristics of work associated with health, well being in a positive or negative way Indices of job qualityBrief contents of the indicators used Earnings indexHourly earnings Prospects indexJob security, career progression, contract quality Intrinsic job qualitySkills and discretion Good social environment Good physical environment Work intensity Working time quality index Duration, scheduling, discretion, short term flexibility See results: Eurofound (2012) Trends in job quality in EuropeTrends in job quality in Europe

18 01/09/ Average job quality by establishment size

19 Rank lowest on earnings, intrinsic job quality and prospects but better on working time quality than cluster 3 Score highest in terms of earnings, intrinsic job quality and prospects, but lower than cluster 2 on working time quality Have the highest level of working time quality and the second-highest levels of intrinsic job quality and prospects; they score slightly lower than cluster 3 in terms of earnings Have the second-highest level of earnings, but rank third in terms of intrinsic job quality and prospects and lowest on working time quality Four job quality clusters

20 Low-quality jobs by Member State (%) (Eurofound, Fifth European Working Conditions Survey)

21 01/09/ Capacity to change: Job quality indices in EU 15 countries,

22 Working Conditions: Physical environment has hardly improved – in spite of efforts Increase in index for skills and discretion in some countries is positive Working Time Quality has improved in all countries Evidence of work intensification is confirmed Countries/groups exposed to different trade-offs (Approach can be narrowed to employment quality or enlarged) One-fifth ‘at risk’ jobs: How acceptable and sustainable? This calls for a wide front of actions … in improving working conditions Changes in: Work organisation and HRM practices may be necessary (the quest for the win-win practices) As well as in developing the public authorities actions in relation to limiting externalities, promoting good practice etc. Monitoring is important 01/09/ To sum up, job quality over time in Europe

23 Selected highlights from European Quality of Life Survey 01/09/

24 Three waves: 2003, 2007 and rd EQLS – 34 countries (EU27, TR, HR, MK, IS, ME, RS, XK) Residents (18+)  Register based stratified random sampling Random routes if no register available Stratification by urbanisation and region interviews  interviews per country  Response rate (RR3) 41.3% (EU27) & 44.7% (non-EU) 38 minute ‘face to face’ interviews at peoples’ homes 25 languages and 13 language variants 01/09/ European Quality of Life Survey

25 Eurofound’s conceptual framework for measuring quality of life in EQLS Scope that people have to attain their goals. Quality of life is measured by objective as well subjective indicators. Quality of life as overarching frame that entails concepts at level of individual, family, community, and society. EQLS is based on a multi-dimensional concept of QoL:  Goes beyond focus on living conditions or resources,  The survey covers broad spectrum of domains of life (employment, housing, family, health, community, participation in society, socioeconomic (in)security);  and analyses interrelationship between domains (such as work, family, health and wellbeing);  Addresses quality of society: trust, intergroup relations, quality of public and neighbourhood services.

26 Core surveyed aspects of quality of life Subjective well-being Living standards and deprivation Home, housing, local environment Employment and work-life balance Family and social life Social exclusion and community involvement Public services, health, healthcare Quality of society European Quality of Life Survey EQLS 2011: 73 questions 183 items

27 Monitoring change over time: Happiness

28 Consistent social inequalities: health satisfaction (scale 1-10), EU27, EQLS

29 Views on the quality of long-term care services More and Better Jobs in Home Care Services - Brussels, 12 September 2013 In general, how would you rate the quality of long-term care services in your country? (on a scale of 1-10, where 1 means very poor and 10 means very high quality) EQLS, 2012

30 Difficulties in accessing long-term care (%) More and Better Jobs in Home Care Services - Brussels, 12 September 2013

31 01/09/ Unpaid work Source: EQLS 2011

32 Challenges for work-life balance by working hours (% at least several times a month) Too tired to do household jobs Family responsibilities sufferDifficult to concentrate at work

33 EU2714% EU1512% EU1221% Men with children15% Women with children17% Involved in childcare ‘every day’16% Involved in eldercare ‘every day’21% 01/09/ Family life and work – Pressures at home and at work

34 01/09/ Proportion reporting problem at least several times a month Working carersNon-carers Too tired to do household jobs54%53% Difficult to fulfil family responsibilities 32%29% Difficult to concentrate at work18%13% Problems at both home and work17%13%

35 01/09/ Health and well-being of carers aged Working carersOther carersNon-carers Bad or very bad health4%15%6% Feeling tense most of the time 14%19%12% Feeling lonely most of the time 7%10%6% Feeling depressed most of the time 6%14%5% Global life satisfaction

36 01/09/ Material well-being of carers aged Working carers Other carers Non- carers Proportion: In lowest income quartile 15%42%24% Having difficulty making ends meet 45%59%46%

37 01/09/ Social exclusion among people of working age (18-64) Proportion who "agree or strongly agree" Working carersOther carersNon-carers What I do in life is worthwhile82%76%79% Free to decide how I live my life72%67%75% Seldom time to do things I enjoy46%41%38% Left out of society11%16%10% Value of what I do not recognised26%29%22% Life complicated, can't find my way20%29%19% People look down on me16%26%17% Social exclusion index

38 01/09/ Social exclusion index

39 Overview report (2012)Quality of Life in Europe: Impacts of the crisis EU27 analytical reports (forthcoming 2013) Trends in quality of life Subjective well-being and quality of life Quality of society and public services Social inequalities in quality of life Enlargement country reports (2013) 7 country profiles in spring 2013 Trend analysis later in 2013: Turkey Croatia FYROM More of EQLS

40 Eurofound Survey web pages  Technical reports  lreport.pdf lreport.pdf External Quality Assessment reports  assessment.pdf assessment.pdf Survey mapping tool on Eurofound website  Data sets freely available on the UK Data archive  40 Data and background information

41 Thank you Contact: 41


Download ppt "Monitoring living and working conditions in the European Union Robert Anderson Eurofound Centre for Workforce Futures Macquarie University, Sydney 20 September."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google