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Student movement: Pathways, fields and links to work Nick Fredman LH Martin Institute University of Melbourne.

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Presentation on theme: "Student movement: Pathways, fields and links to work Nick Fredman LH Martin Institute University of Melbourne."— Presentation transcript:

1 Student movement: Pathways, fields and links to work Nick Fredman LH Martin Institute University of Melbourne

2 Student movement: Pathways, fields and links to work A study of flows in tertiary education linking findings from the ABS Survey of Education and Training to occupational structures. Part of the NCVER-supported project ‘Vocations: post-compulsory education and the labour market’. 1.Contexts: participation, pathways and transfers; 2.A lack of coherence between education and work in Australia; 3.Change in patterns of student transfers over time by different initial fields; 4.Field-changing between successive qualifications; 5.Conclusions; 2

3 1. Contexts: Participation, pathways and transfers 3 Policy context: targets to boost participation in tertiary education for both productivity and social inclusion; One means: improving interconnections in a “less fragmented” and “easier to navigate” education system; A focus in this on internal mechanics of education such as credit transfer and articulation (rather than links with work); An assumption in this focus that transfers are upward and in the same field.

4 2. A lack of coherence between education and work Multiple study in the same field good from a narrow, utilitarian framework; Also good from a broader framework of building capabilities to participate in creative labour and social life (Sen and Nussbaum); Coherence in relation to education and work here seen as the extent to which education and work are mutually reinforcing in building capabilities; Lack of coherence: –Most VET graduates don’t work in areas of their study; –There’s considerable mismatches between education, skills and work; –Mismatches lead to work dis-satisfaction; How do student flows relate to coherence? 4

5 3. Change in student transfers over time Source: ABS Survey of Education and Training, 2001, 2005 and Figure1Those in workforce with one, two or three or more qualifications in 2001, 2005 and 2009, per cent

6 3.Change in student transfers over time — agriculture and environment as first qualification Source: ABS Survey of Education and Training, st qual. sector When 1 st qual. completed No. Subsequent qualification, % NoneVETHENot det.Total VETPre – HEPre – VET: little further education but increasing and more than e.g. engineering; Reflects agricultural work: there are major barriers to advancement but a stratum of workers gain mid-range jobs with education;

7 3.Change in student transfers over time — commerce and management as first qualification Source: ABS Survey of Education and Training, st qual. sector When 1 st qual. completed No. Subsequent qualification, % NoneVETHENot det.Total VETPre – HEPre – C.f. agriculture and environment more growth, more multiple qualifications; Reflects developments in financial services work towards tighter licensing and greater use of credentials as initial screening.

8 3.Change in student transfers over time — health as first qualification Source: ABS Survey of Education and Training, st qual. sector When 1st qual. completed No. Subsequent qualification, % NoneVETHENot det.Total VETPre – HEPre – Higher proportion of the earlier group transferred from VET to higher education, with the pattern markedly opposite in sequential higher education study; Reflects change in registration and increased credentialism in nursing work.

9 3.Change in student transfers over time — engineering as first qualification Source: ABS Survey of Education and Training, st qual. sector When 1st qual. completed No. Subsequent qualification, % NoneVETHENot det.Total VETPre – HEPre – Relatively low and static rates of multiple qualifications; Reflects strong differentiation in knowledge and skills in engineering occupations, in contrast to finance (and natural sciences).

10 4.Field-changing between successive qualifications 10 Figure 2Numbers completing a second qualification by period and proportions changing fields from their first qualification Source: ABS Survey of Education and Training, 2009

11 4.Field-changing between successive qualifications 11 Figure 3Percentage of students changing fields between a first and second qualification for each pathway, with 95% confidence intervals Source: ABS Survey of Education and Training, 2009

12 4.Field-changing between successive qualifications 12 Figure 4Percentage of students changing fields between a first and second qualification for each initial field of education, with 95% confidence intervals Source:ABS Survey of Education and Training, 2009

13 5.Conclusions and questions 13 Patterns of student flows explainable by labour market and regulatory structures; Addressing incoherences means addressing links between education and work, not just adjusting internal mechanisms of education; Can a broad focus on capabilities and vocational streams improve coherence?


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