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How can THAT be Art?. Marcel Duchamp “Fountain” 1917 This is a mass-produced ceramic urinal, signed with the false name “R.Mutt”. It was entered in an.

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Presentation on theme: "How can THAT be Art?. Marcel Duchamp “Fountain” 1917 This is a mass-produced ceramic urinal, signed with the false name “R.Mutt”. It was entered in an."— Presentation transcript:

1 How can THAT be Art?

2 Marcel Duchamp “Fountain” 1917 This is a mass-produced ceramic urinal, signed with the false name “R.Mutt”. It was entered in an exhibition for which Duchamp was on the selection committee …. and was rejected. Duchamp went on to defend the work in the pages of an art magazine, claiming that whether or not Mr Mutt had made the object was irrelevant. What was important was that he chose it. This work was voted by arts professionals the most influential artwork of the 20 th Century

3 Michelangelo Merisi “Caravaggio” Madonna dei Palafrenieri (1605) Caravaggio was in trouble with the authorities for most of his life. He lived a bohemian existence among the low life characters of Rome. His police record shows prosecutions for fighting, being illegally armed, and killing a man. He had to escape, first to Naples, then to Malta. He died under suspicious circumstances. In this picture he shows us the Virgin Mary with the infant Jesus, who are crushing evil in the form of a snake. As was his custom he chose his models from his friends and associates – in this case the Virgin Mary, showing a little too much cleavage, is a rather too well known prostitute called Lena. As a result many of Caravaggio’s church paintings were rejected as inappropriate.

4 Piero Manzoni “Merda d’Artista” 1961 “In1961 an artist by the name af Piero Manzoni crapped in 90 small cans. They were subsequently sealed, according to industri standards. These small pieces of art circulated for many years to different museums around the world, and one of them reached Randers Museum of Art in Denmark in 1994 as part of the John Hunov collection. Unfortunately, the can decided to selfdestruct right there! “

5 Jackson Pollock “Number ” P ainting - enamel on gesso on paper support: 575 x 784 mm

6 Pollock began to drip and pour paint in This work, in which streams of black and white enamels were poured onto the surface, shows the improvisatory possibilities of this method. The sweeping arc of Pollock's gesture can be seen in the liquid black, which has bled into the white painted background to become grey. This acts as a base over which the thicker white paint is deliberately woven. The effect is rhythmic but controlled, energetic but delicate. Although there was an element of chance, Pollock frequently emphasised the importance of decisions over the merely accidental. From the display caption October 2000 From the display caption October 2000 "When I am in my painting, I'm not aware of what I'm doing. It is only after a sort of "get acquainted" period that I see what I have been about. I have no fears about making changes, destroying the image, etc., because the painting has a life of its own. I try to let it come through. It is only when I lose contact with the painting that the result is a mess. Otherwise there is pure harmony, an easy give and take, and the painting comes out well." An alcoholic all his adult life, Pollock died in a car crash near his home in Long Island. Had he survived he would have faced charges of manslaughter over the death of his female passenger.

7 Robert Rauschenberg's "Monogram" (1955-9) An artwork made from junk: a collage laid flat on the floor; a stuffed angora goat with it’s face painted standing on the collage, with a tyre around it; the tread of the tyre painted white.

8 “Robert Rauschenberg's "Monogram" (1955-9) takes the abstract painting off the wall and puts it back on the horizontal. Then it puts a goat and a tire on top of the canvas. By doing this--by mixing the high heroism of Pollock's abstraction with a taxidermist's trophy and a piece of trash--he divests the painting of all its mystique. But not its mystery. What happens to a painting on a stretcher when it is put on the horizontal? What is the relation of the goat (which also has paint on it) to that canvas? To the tire that surrounds it? What is the relation of the goat (which also has paint on it) to that canvas? To the tire that surrounds it? Where can you stand to see the whole thing? How big is it? What kinds of questions does Rauschenberg's piece pose to your notions of art? Of the notions of purity that we find in Duccio, in Memling, in Rothko and Pollock? “

9 Claes Oldenburg, Soft Toilet, 1966 Vinyl, plexiglass, and kapok, on painted wood base How is this toilet similar to and different from a real toilet? What materials do you think the artist might have used to make this sculpture? If you had to move it, how would you carry this toilet? If you could take this sculpture home, where would you put it? ry/gallery_question.php?work=15

10 Donald Judd 100 untitled works in mill aluminum, Donald Judd was a minimalist sculptor whose late work largely consisted of rectangular boxes with small variations. They were made by fabricators to his specifications. I’m not sure why I’m impressed … but I am!

11 Donald Judd 100 untitled works in mill aluminum, At the center of the Chinati Foundation's permanent collection are 100 untitled works in mill aluminum by Donald Judd installed in two former artillery sheds. The size and scale of the buildings determined the nature of the installation, and Judd adapted the buildings specifically for this purpose. He replaced derelict garage doors with long walls of continuous squared and quartered windows which flood the spaces with light. Judd also added a vaulted roof in galvanized iron on top of the original flat roof, thus doubling the buildings' height. The semi-circular ends of the roof vaults were to be made of glass. Each of the 100 works has the same outer dimensions (41 x 51 x 72 inches), although the interior is unique in every piece. The Lippincott Company of Connecticut fabricated the works from aluminum that was rolled especially for the series by the Reynolds Mill in McCook, Illinois. They were manufactured, shipped, and installed over a four- year period from 1982 through

12 Richard Serra “Tilted Arc” 1981, sculpture, steel, New York City (destroyed). This sculpture was disliked by people who used this plaza. The work cost $175000, After a legal battle it was cut up and removed. Serra commented "I don't think it is the function of art to be pleasing …….. Art is not democratic. It is not for the people."

13 Rachel Whiteread, "House" London Rachel Whitread made a cement cast of the inside of a London terraced house. Locals were mostly in favour of keeping the work, but the council disliked it and destroyed it. In 1993 Whiteread won the prestigious Turner Prize as the leading British artist, and the same day the K Foundation awarded Whiteread their prize of £40,000 for the 'worst' artist in Britain.

14 How Rachel Whiteread’s “House” was destroyed With only 6 days between the completion of the work and the expiry of the short lease on 31st October, Artangel endeavoured to negotiate an extension and the work continued to remain standing beyond the deadline for its demolition. Press coverage following the completion of the work had been substantial, partly as Whiteread had been nominated for the Turner Prize. However on November 23rd a number of key events coincided which were to cause an explosion of media interest. At 2pm, the K Foundation awarded Whiteread their prize of £40,000 for the 'worst' artist in Britain. At 7.30pm Bow Neighbourhood demanded the immediate demolition of House and at 9.30pm Whiteread was awarded the 1993 Turner Prize of £40,000, broadcast live from the Tate Gallery on Channel 4 Television. The confrontation between the local authority and Whiteread became very public and adversarial. At 7.30pm Bow Neighbourhood demanded the immediate demolition of House and at 9.30pm Whiteread was awarded the 1993 Turner Prize of £40,000, broadcast live from the Tate Gallery on Channel 4 Television. The confrontation between the local authority and Whiteread became very public and adversarial. On the 26th, an early day motion was tabled in the House of Commons by Michael Gordon MP and Hugh Bayley MP congratulating Whiteread on winning the Turner Prize and calling upon Tower Hamlets to allow a time extension so that more people could see the work and to consult with local people as to whether it should be destroyed. The motion eventually collected over 50 signatures including those of Ken Livingstone and Alan Howarth. A petition of 3,500 signatures collected on site in 12 hours supporting an extension was countered by 800 signatures urging its destruction. On December 10th Bow Neighbourhood agreed in principle to an extension to January 12th 1994 and, 3 days before Christmas, this was finally approved by Cllr. Flounders. On January 11th House was demolished.

15 Andres Serrano “Piss Christ” 1989 Photograph showing: Plastic crucifix in urine with cow’s blood. This work was withdrawn from exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria after protests from religious groups. Questions: Under what circumstances if any should a work be censored? What is it about this photograph that might offend?

16 1.shtml Tracey Emin “My Bed” 1998/1999 “Tracey Emin’s My Bed, short-listed in autumn 1999 for the Turner Prize, presents a base supporting a mattress, on top of which are rumpled sheets, pillows, panty-hose and a towel; cluttered alongside is an assortment of items from vodka bottles to slippers and underwear, cigarette packs to condoms and contraceptives, Polaroid (self)portraits to a white fluffy toy.” Deborah Cherry

17 Damien Hirst “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living” (1991) “With …. his infamous tiger shark in a glass tank of formaldehyde shown at the Saatchi Gallery, Damien Hirst became a media icon and household name. He has since been imitated, parodied, reproached and exalted by the media and public alike.” Hirst sold the work to collector Charles Saatchi for ₤50,000. In January 2005 Saatchi sold the work for approx. ₤7m

18 Australian performance artist Stelarc has spent a large part of his career hanging about – here suspended from lines attached to large metal hooks. He has also experimented with extra additions to his body – a third arm, or a third ear. ns/public/stelarc/Stelarc.html

19 Mike Parr is a one-armed Australian performance artist. In this performance he had his arm nailed to a wall. ball/issue%2028/Parr=_Malevich_A_P olitical_Arm_.html

20 Jeff Koons “Puppy” 1992 Mixed media Sculpture The visible part of the sculpture is made of living flowers, planted into a prefabricated frame. Is this “good taste” or merely “Kitsch”.


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