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Explore Research Experiment Create Evaluate. Exploring media: mini projects > Choose 2 mini projects to complete by the end of term 4 > Must complete.

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Presentation on theme: "Explore Research Experiment Create Evaluate. Exploring media: mini projects > Choose 2 mini projects to complete by the end of term 4 > Must complete."— Presentation transcript:

1 Explore Research Experiment Create Evaluate

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4 Exploring media: mini projects > Choose 2 mini projects to complete by the end of term 4 > Must complete an individual project News media (Keynote) Social networking media Photojournalis m (Photoshop, Piknic) Advertising (Illustrator) Music media (Garageband)

5 CREATE EXPERIMENT RESEARCHEXPLORE EVALUATE

6 Collect images of the media you are investigating (remember a bibliography) What are the elements and principles in these pictures? Explore Asking BIG inquiry questions about the future of your media Explain the history of your media What is the social and cultural context? Research Experiment with your media Eg: make a range of photographs, write news articles, write a report on the history of social media (at least 3 projects) Use elements and principles of art Who are your target audience? Experiment Using one of those media, communicate a message to target audience Apply technical skill to create a finished product Innovative and creative! Create Written report summarising your design process What was good/bad about the media you used? Show understanding of purpose, history, audience, technical qualities Evaluate

7 Design Elements & Principles

8 Line Represents a single dimension – length. The path left by a moving point. Can be straight, curved, or irregular. Can be physically represented in an artwork or can be visual references to space. Can create shape, tone, form and texture. Shape Represents two-dimensions – length and width. Can be geometric, abstract or irregular. May be enhanced by tone, texture and colour. Form Represents three dimensions – length, width and depth. Shadows and highlights help us to ‘read’ the enclosed volume or space. Created by joining two or more shapes, and may be enhanced by tone, texture and colour. Tone The degree of lightness or darkness of aspects of an artwork, enhancing the appearance of light and shadow Colour Primary, secondary or tertiary. Can be divided into warm, and cool. Evokes an emotional response from people by influencing our moods and behaviours, which can aid visual communication. Texture The surface quality of an artwork. It is how things feel, or look as though they may feel, when touched. Can be ‘real’ (created by brushstrokes or materials), or ‘implied’ (simulated). Helps to describe the detail of an object or environment. Space Created by the arrangement of the elements in an artwork. Can be positive or negative.

9 Contrast Refers to the use of opposing elements to create interest – large-small (scale), dark- light (tone), soft-hard (texture), warm-cold (colours). Rhythm Created by the repetition of elements which encourages the viewer’s eye to move around the artwork. Unity Refers to the totality of the design, achieved when all the elements work together. Each visual element and section must look as if it belongs to the overall design. Pattern/ Repetition Organised use of a recurring element. May be a simple arrangement of lines, shapes or images echoed in sequence. Can create a sense of rhythm and movement, or a sense of order. Balance Can be symmetrical or asymmetrical. Created by the arrangement of the different elements in relation to the horizontal and vertical axis. Creates stability and harmony in a composition, making an artwork more visually appealing. Composition An arrangement or combination of the design elements. Emphasis/ Hierarchy The main area of interest created by arranging certain elements, drawing the attention of the viewer: focal points can be created using contrast within a certain element, size and placement of elements, and using lines and rhythm to draw our attention. Movement May be created through patterns – the repetition of shapes, images or forms creates predictable patterns and establishes a rhythm within an artwork

10 CBA Explore Ask what, who, how, where, when, why? Collect imagery and text from a range of sources. Make written observations (annotations) about use of elements and principles. Annotations make connections between images/materials and describe the use of elements and principals. Annotations provide detailed descriptions of technical qualities and analyse the use of elements of principals (Critical observations). Research Research report Ask BIG research questions. Find and summarise information about the history of the medium and how it has changed over time. Research the social and cultural context. Use of a variety of reliable resources. Keep a record of sources (Bibliography). Research essay Discussion explains history and development of medium; shows understanding of purpose and audience. Connections are made between various sources. Critical essay Analysis of the role of the medium in our society and discussion of the changes in relation to social change. Accurate use of referencing and correct bibliography. Experiment A range of trials to explore using the medium; practise using design elements and principles. Identify an audience. Make brief notes explaining what you have done and why, with consideration for audience. Make connections to research findings. Trials experiment with elements and principles in various ways. Trials target different audiences. Annotations explain the method and purpose of each trial, comment on success, and suggest how it could be further improved. Trials target different audiences. Each trial builds on the previous – annotations explain decisions made. Annotations analyse the impact of each trial in relation to elements, principles, and audience. Create Use your research and experimentation to design a finished product in your chosen medium. Identify audience and purpose. Draft/sketch/brainstorm before deciding on your final product. A range of drafts/sketches explore possible solutions, and draw on research and experiments. Annotations explain choices for the final product in relation to audience. Original ideas. Innovative use of materials and medium. Successfully and powerfully communicates meaning to the identified audience. Sophisticated application of ideas and use of equipment/materials. Evaluate Write an evaluation summarising your design process, from exploring to creating. Reflect on what you have learnt and what you would like to know more about. Evaluate the effectiveness of your finished product in relation to the purpose and audience. Evaluation analyses the purpose of the medium and the way it is used to address different audiences. Analyse the effectiveness of your finished product in relation to purpose, audience and use of elements and principles.

11 Step 1: Explore CBA Ask what, who, how, where, when, why? (write a paragraph) Collect imagery and text from a range of sources. Make written observations (annotations) about use of elements and principles. Annotations make connections between images/materials and describe the use of elements and principals. Annotations provide detailed descriptions of technical qualities and analyse the use of elements of principals (Critical observations).

12 Explore What is the purpose of the media? Who uses it? How has the media changed over recent decades/centuries? Where is it used/available? When was it created? Why do we need it? What impact does the medium have on our lives?

13 Step 2: Research CBA Research report (at least 400 words) Ask BIG research questions. What do you want to find out? Find and summarise information about the history of the medium and how it has changed over time. Use of a variety of reliable resources. Keep a record of sources (Bibliography). Research essay (at last 300 words) Discussion explains history and development of medium; shows understanding of purpose and audience. Connections are made between various sources. Keep a record of sources (Bibliography). Critical essay (at least 400 words) Analysis of the role of the medium in our society and discussion of the changes in relation to social change. Accurate use of referencing and correct bibliography.

14 Step 3: Experiment – choose 1 media… CBA A range of trials to explore using the medium; practise using design elements and principles. Identify an audience. Make brief notes explaining what you have done and why, with consideration for audience. Trials experiment with elements and principles in various ways. Trials target different audiences. Annotations explain the method and purpose of each trial, comment on success, and suggest how it could be further improved. Trials target different audiences. Each trial builds on the previous – annotations explain decisions made. Annotations analyse the impact of each trial in relation to elements, principles, and audience.

15 Step 4: Create CBA Use your research and experimentation to design a finished product in your chosen medium. Identify audience and purpose. Draft/sketch/brainstorm before deciding on your final product. A range of drafts/sketches explore possible solutions, and draw on research and experiments. Annotations explain choices for the final product in relation to audience. Original ideas. Innovative use of materials and medium. Successfully and powerfully communicates meaning to the identified audience. Sophisticated application of ideas and use of equipment/materials.

16 Step 5: Evaluate CBA Write an evaluation report summarising your design process, from exploring to creating. Reflect on what you have learnt and what you would like to know more about. Write an evaluation report that analyses the aim of the medium and the way it is used to address different audiences. Analyse the effectiveness of your finished product in relation to aim, audience and use of elements and principles.

17 For example… The first project you choose is ‘photojournalism’. Step 1: EXPLORE. Answer the questions in the ‘explore’ section. Step 2: RESEARCH. Write an essay/report on the way that photojournalism has changed over time (using references and a bibliography). You could use some examples of journalists that have received awards for the work and use their photographs as examples of photojournalism. Step 3: EXPERIMENT. Decide on what you want to say to a certain audience. For example: do a series of photographs on the effects of bullying for teenagers aged Take HEAPS of photographs and experiment using design elements and principles until you are happy that you really understand what photojournalism is all about. Step 4: CREATE. Decide who your audience is for the media product. Choose a smaller number of those photographs to edit in Photoshop, print them and prepare them for final presentation. BE CREATIVE! Step 5: EVALUATE. Write a report that analyses the strengths and weaknesses of your final product and how well it achieves its purpose. IF YOU CAN THINK OF ANOTHER MEDIA THAT YOU WOULD LIKE TO INVESTIGATE, TALK TO ME ABOUT IT!

18 When is it due? Due on Wednesday 5 September. Your work should have headings: Explore Research Experiment Create Evaluate Yes, you can type it!


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