Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

EDU3473 Lecture F1 Pedagogy, ICTs and HOTS Petrea Redmond.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "EDU3473 Lecture F1 Pedagogy, ICTs and HOTS Petrea Redmond."— Presentation transcript:

1 EDU3473 Lecture F1 Pedagogy, ICTs and HOTS Petrea Redmond

2 EDU3473 Lecture F2 COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA Copyright Regulations 1969 WARNING This material has been copied and communicated to you by or on behalf of the University of Southern Queensland pursuant to Part VA of the Copyright Act 1968 (the Act). The material in this communication may be subject to copyright under the Act. Any further copying or communication of this material by you may be the subject of copyright protection under the Act. Do not remove this notice.

3 EDU3473 Lecture F3 Where to today? Teaching: a people jobTeaching: a people job Pedagogy, ICT, 21 st CenturyPedagogy, ICT, 21 st Century ICT in EducationICT in Education HOTSHOTS Information LiteracyInformation Literacy

4 EDU3473 Lecture F4 PCE TRAMS (Toowoomba Refugee and Migrant Services) is an organisation which helps refugees and migrants become accustomed to life in Toowoomba. From teaching English to helping mothers with caring for their children, this organisation covers a range of services and is always looking for volunteers.TRAMS (Toowoomba Refugee and Migrant Services) is an organisation which helps refugees and migrants become accustomed to life in Toowoomba. From teaching English to helping mothers with caring for their children, this organisation covers a range of services and is always looking for volunteers. If you wish to do PCE with TRAMS contact Amber on 46329285. This opportunity will be available all year and is essential to practitioners who wish to gain an insight into the difficulties faced by migrants and refugees (esp. the Sudanese) and determine how to meet these needs.If you wish to do PCE with TRAMS contact Amber on 46329285. This opportunity will be available all year and is essential to practitioners who wish to gain an insight into the difficulties faced by migrants and refugees (esp. the Sudanese) and determine how to meet these needs.

5 EDU3473 Lecture F5 Think about the way we treat people During my second month of college, our professor gave us a pop quiz. I was conscientious student and had breezed through the questions, until read the last one: "What is the first name of the woman who cleans the school?" Surely this was some kind of joke. I had seen the cleaning woman several times. She was tall, dark-haired and in her 50s, but how would I know her name? I handed in my paper, leaving the last question blank. Just before class ended, one student asked if the last question would count toward our quiz grade. "Absolutely," said the professor. "In your careers, you will meet many people. All are significant. They deserve your attention and care, even all you do is smile and say "hello". I've never forgotten that lesson. I also learned her name was Dorothy.

6 EDU3473 Lecture F6 What is pedagogy?

7 EDU3473 Lecture F7 What effects pedagogy in the 21 st century – the Knowledge Age Learning to ThinkLearning to Think Learning to LearnLearning to Learn Growing body of informationGrowing body of information Restructuring of schoolsRestructuring of schools Dealing with changeDealing with change Global IssuesGlobal IssuesGlobal IssuesGlobal Issues

8 EDU3473 Lecture F8 How do I move my students from: I know nothing to I know something??How do I move my students from: I know nothing to I know something?? InteractionInteraction TransactionTransaction

9 EDU3473 Lecture F9 Pedagogy & ICTs Technology Pedagogy involves fostering & promoting learning using electronic ‘tools’ (ICTs)Technology Pedagogy involves fostering & promoting learning using electronic ‘tools’ (ICTs)

10 EDU3473 Lecture F10 Zhao et all, 2002 Teachers pedagogy influences the success of ICT innovationTeachers pedagogy influences the success of ICT innovation

11 EDU3473 Lecture F11 21 st Century Pedagogy Link to constructivist approachLink to constructivist approach Students creation and not copyingStudents creation and not copying ICTs: teachers plan to engage their students in purposeful and appropriate ICTs experiences with a view to transform the learning opportunitiesICTs: teachers plan to engage their students in purposeful and appropriate ICTs experiences with a view to transform the learning opportunities

12 EDU3473 Lecture F12 Whipple (1987) asserts: “Education does not consist merely of ‘pouring’ facts from the teacher to the students as though they were glasses to be filled with some form of intellectual orange juice. Knowledge is an interactive process, not an accumulation of Trivial Pursuit answers; education at its best develops the students' ability to learn for themselves”.

13 EDU3473 Lecture F13 Tell me and I forget Show me and I remember Involve me and I understand

14 EDU3473 Lecture F14 Productive Pedagogies Productive Pedagogies “…there are at least four dimensions of classroom practice which are potentially necessary conditions for improved and more equitable student outcomes

15 EDU3473 Lecture F15 high degrees of intellectual quality,high degrees of intellectual quality, high levels of demonstrable relevance,high levels of demonstrable relevance, highly supportive classroom environments,highly supportive classroom environments, strong recognition of difference.”strong recognition of difference.” QSRLS Vol 2 p 4

16 EDU3473 Lecture F16 No single solution Multiple paths ways for students Multiple opportunities Variety of learning styles Variety of special needs Variety of content Variety of geographical locations Variety of resources availability

17 EDU3473 Lecture F17 industrial society to information society technology peripheral to multimedia central once-only education to life-long learning fixed curriculum to flexible/open curriculum institutional focus to learner focus self contained to partnerships local focus to global networking Paradigm shift in Education:

18 EDU3473 Lecture F18 How we go about our work from Allan Glen EXPOSITORY INQUIRy Read/Listen Recall/Recite Assess Read Explain Apply Summarize Assess Question Hypothesize Gather data Conclude Apply Teacher Center Participant Student Consumer Producer Assess

19 EDU3473 Lecture F19 Why integrate ICTs into education? Q. Are these reasons adequate? Technology is pervasive in society Equips students for the workforce Schools down the road use laptops Potential benefits for students Potential benefits for teachers Children use computers at home

20 EDU3473 Lecture F20 Effective learning through ICTs provides a dynamic student-centred learning environment. supports students in constructing their own knowledge and understanding preparing independent and life-long learners (Sheingold, K., 1991, p20)must be deeply integrated into the purposes and activities of the classroom to enhance student learning (Sheingold, K., 1991, p20)

21 EDU3473 Lecture F21 Technology in Education? TV was thought to be the saviour of education….. So do computers have the potential to revolutionise teaching and learning? –Does the answer lie in the types of machines and programs used? –How important is the teacher’s knowledge of computers? –Is the way they are used a key ingredient? –Is a laptop for each student the answer?

22 EDU3473 Lecture F22 ICTs in education: the past Computer literacy – about computers Domain of secondary Business and Maths teachers Word processing and curriculum software

23 EDU3473 Lecture F23 ICTs in education: - present and future Teaching about and with ICT Classrooms with Internet access – –Children connecting to other schools, community and experts Wide range of generic and curriculum software

24 EDU3473 Lecture F24 Rationale for computer integration Provides student-centred learning Supports constructivist learning Increases motivation Increases engagement Provides empowerment Develops problem solving skills Supports collaborative learning

25 EDU3473 Lecture F25 Rationale for integration (cont) Increases productivity Access to information Links to learning tools Unique instructional characteristics Develops communication skills Encourages educational reform

26 EDU3473 Lecture F26 Learning with Technology “...it is not the features of technology alone, but rather the ways in which those features are used in [the classroom] that shape its impact.” (Sheingold, K., 1991, p18) Teachers are still the key to creating relevant and meaningful learning environments (Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow, 1995)

27 EDU3473 Lecture F27 Just in Case V’s Just in Time Traditionally information and skills have been taught to students Just In Case they need them in the future.

28 EDU3473 Lecture F28

29 EDU3473 Lecture F29 How does ICT effect pedagogy Limited resources All students won’t do the same thing and the same time Unique and increased opportunities Creation of tasks where the use of ICT is integral to the learning process Comfort zone different between many students and teachers

30 EDU3473 Lecture F30 Ridiculous Key Make a ridiculous statement that would be virtually impossible to implement, and then make an attempt to actually substantiate it. The expressions “It’s not possible” and “That’s ridiculous” often prevent the development of many excellence ideas. Learn to break through them.

31 EDU3473 Lecture F31 Ridiculous Key – Your turn “The government should provide every child a computer at the age of 5”. Some consequences:

32 EDU3473 Lecture F32 HOTS – Higher Order Thinking Skills “The Question is the Answer”

33 EDU3473 Lecture F33 Some of these slides have been adapted from work by Lindy Mckeown developed in her role as Education Adviser in Learning Technology. http://www.teachers.ash.org.au/lindy/info-lit/presentation/sld001.htm

34 EDU3473 Lecture F34

35 EDU3473 Lecture F35

36 EDU3473 Lecture F36 Information Literacy – What does it really mean?

37 EDU3473 Lecture F37 Personal Reflection Task On a sheet of paper write down the last research assignment you saw a teacher give on prac, or one you remember from school. Keep this for later.

38 EDU3473 Lecture F38 Read and Regurgitate Disease - NOT

39 EDU3473 Lecture F39 An information literate person is one who: Recognises that accurate and complete information is the basis for intelligent decision makingRecognises that accurate and complete information is the basis for intelligent decision making Recognises the need for informationRecognises the need for information Formulates questions based on information needsFormulates questions based on information needs Identifies potential sources of informationIdentifies potential sources of information Develops successful search strategiesDevelops successful search strategies Accesses information from sources including technological based sourcesAccesses information from sources including technological based sources Evaluates informationEvaluates information Organises information for practical applicationOrganises information for practical application Integrates new information into existing knowledgeIntegrates new information into existing knowledge Uses information in critical thinking and problem-solvingUses information in critical thinking and problem-solving

40 EDU3473 Lecture F40 "the abilities to recognize when information is needed and to locate, evaluate, effectively use, and communicate information in its various formats" (SUNY) 30 Sept. 1997."the abilities to recognize when information is needed and to locate, evaluate, effectively use, and communicate information in its various formats" (SUNY) 30 Sept. 1997. “a new liberal art that extends from knowing how to use computers and access information to critical reflection on the nature of information itself, its technical infrastructure, and its social, cultural and even philosophical context and impact" - Shapiro, Jeremy J. and Shelley K. Hughes. 2. Mar./Apr. 1996.“a new liberal art that extends from knowing how to use computers and access information to critical reflection on the nature of information itself, its technical infrastructure, and its social, cultural and even philosophical context and impact" - Shapiro, Jeremy J. and Shelley K. Hughes. 2. Mar./Apr. 1996.

41 EDU3473 Lecture F41 Diagnosis Using the Blooms Taxonomy handout analyse the question your wrote down at the beginning of the lecture. Rate the cognitive load. Light Weight -----------------Heavy Weight (Comprehension)(Evaluation)

42 EDU3473 Lecture F42 ILPO – Information Literacy Planning Overview The ILPO model is a guide for lesson planning to introduce students to skills for life-long learning with Information Literacy and Technology integrated into the planning This process model of Information Literacy has the following 6 steps ILPO site

43 EDU3473 Lecture F43 Information Literacy provides a process for: Define the problem – What exactly do I have to do? Students recognise the need for information. Locate Resources – Where will I find the information I need? Students know where and how to find information from a range of sources

44 EDU3473 Lecture F44 Select/Analyse resources – Which of these resources will be of use to me? Students know how to select information. Organise/Synthesise – How can I best organise my information to solve my problem/complete my task? Students develop as critical thinkers and problem solvers.

45 EDU3473 Lecture F45 Create/Present – How can I best present my solution? Students communication information to others. Evaluate – How well did I complete my task? Students build a dynamic view of themselves as confident and discerning information users.

46 EDU3473 Lecture F46 Classroom Fitness is a balancing act

47 EDU3473 Lecture F47 Traditional instruction Project-based/Inquiry based teaching Helps children ACQUIRE skillsHelps children ACQUIRE skills Addresses DEFICIENCIES in learningAddresses DEFICIENCIES in learning Stresses EXTRINSIC motivationStresses EXTRINSIC motivation Allows TEACHERS to direct children’s work, use their expertise, and specify the tasks that children performAllows TEACHERS to direct children’s work, use their expertise, and specify the tasks that children perform Provide children with opportunities to APPLY skillsProvide children with opportunities to APPLY skills Addresses children’s PROFICIENCIESAddresses children’s PROFICIENCIES Stresses INTRINSIC motivationStresses INTRINSIC motivation Encourages CHILDREN to determine what to work on, accepts them as experts about their needsEncourages CHILDREN to determine what to work on, accepts them as experts about their needs

48 EDU3473 Lecture F48 Classroom fitness Balance projects which have a high cognitive load, with instructional teaching which scaffolds students to success.

49 EDU3473 Lecture F49

50 EDU3473 Lecture F50 Do they perturb? (Tom March) Are they essential questions? (Jamie McKenzie) Do they create cognitive load? (Lindy McKeown) Your questions/tasks, where do they fit?

51 EDU3473 Lecture F51 What is so important about the question? The Information Literacy Process requires students to progress through a series of steps. Definitions of the steps have been developed by several people but all begin with defining the problem. This implies there is a problem to start with, not a statement, not a theme, not a topic but a question or problem.

52 EDU3473 Lecture F52 If the only problem a student faces is that the teacher has set a topic to find facts about, then maybe more work needs to be done by the teacher to find a problem which will then provide the context for the development of knowledge, skills and attitudes. Certainly information gathering, note making and writing will often be part of the process of finding a solution to the question or problem, but there will also be an important activity after fact finding in which students will bring the information found to bear on the problem at hand. At this time an original or personal response will be developed not a mere regurgitation of fact.

53 EDU3473 Lecture F53 In creating problems and questions, the aims are: to raise the cognitive load of the task by providing opportunities for higher order thinking beyond mere knowledge gathering and comprehension; and to provide a real life or life-like context in which to learn.

54 EDU3473 Lecture F54 Finding the right challenge Jamie McKenzie's questioning toolkitJamie McKenzie's questioning toolkitJamie McKenzie's questioning toolkitJamie McKenzie's questioning toolkit The Big 6The Big 6The Big 6The Big 6 Bloom’s TaxonomyBloom’s TaxonomyBloom’s TaxonomyBloom’s Taxonomy Module MakerModule MakerModule MakerModule Maker Higher-Order Thinking Strategies for the ClassroomHigher-Order Thinking Strategies for the ClassroomHigher-Order Thinking Strategies for the ClassroomHigher-Order Thinking Strategies for the Classroom

55 EDU3473 Lecture F55 How much thinking? If our thinking meter has a 1-7 scale where 7 is the highest, how would you rate each of the following questions? 1. How many people were killed in this tragedy? Skimming for information (facts or opinions)? 2. What was reported about the crash moment? Look for closely (facts or opinions)? 3. Who should take the "blame" for this tragedy? Appeal to the affective (and thinking) domain of students

56 EDU3473 Lecture F56 Embedding Technology into the Information Literacy Process

57 EDU3473 Lecture F57 How can you use ICTs to assist in: Defining Locating Selecting/analyzing Organising/Synthesizing Creating/Presenting Evaluating

58 EDU3473 Lecture F58

59 EDU3473 Lecture F59 Inquiry based learning, Problem based learning, Rich tasks, Authentic tasks Authentic tasks are assignments/projects that have a real-world application. Such tasks bear a strong resemblance to tasks performed in nonschool settings (such as the home, an organization, or the workplace) and require students to apply a broad range of knowledge and skills. Often, they fill a genuine need for the students and result in a tangible end product.

60 EDU3473 Lecture F60 Healthy thinking taskRead and regurgitate disease Response involves students creating original thinking (for them) expressed in their own words. (Creating new knowledge) Position is justified from research Response is a regurgitation of facts (sometimes) in students own words or copied from a book or CDROM Response is not supported with facts Response Rubric

61 EDU3473 Lecture F61 AuthenticContrived Has an audience other than the teacher in assessment mode who has a vested interest in the content of the presentation Audience is the teacher (or peers) conducting assessment and the rest of the class but the class has no purpose other than occupying the seats Audience Rubric

62 EDU3473 Lecture F62 Some places to go for ideas Planning for LearningPlanning for LearningPlanning for LearningPlanning for Learning Why do project based learning?Why do project based learning?Why do project based learning?Why do project based learning? Rich TasksRich TasksRich TasksRich Tasks HOTS – Higher Order Thinking StrategiesHOTS – Higher Order Thinking StrategiesHOTS – Higher Order Thinking StrategiesHOTS – Higher Order Thinking Strategies E LearningE LearningE LearningE Learning

63 EDU3473 Lecture F63 Other sites on information literacy Information Literacy ProgramInformation Literacy ProgramInformation Literacy ProgramInformation Literacy Program Forum on Information LiteracyForum on Information LiteracyForum on Information LiteracyForum on Information Literacy Web-and-Flow Help: Transforming InformationWeb-and-Flow Help: Transforming InformationWeb-and-Flow Help: Transforming InformationWeb-and-Flow Help: Transforming Information Some Information Literacy StandardsSome Information Literacy StandardsSome Information Literacy StandardsSome Information Literacy Standards

64 EDU3473 Lecture F64 Filamentality http://www.filamentality.com/wired/fil/index.htmlhttp://www.filamentality.com/wired/fil/index.htmlhttp://www.filamentality.com/wired/fil/index.html Filamentality activity Quality online activity created with a high level of intellectual rigour Demonstrates the ability to effectively create an online activity with some intellectual rigour Appropriate online activity created Online activity completed with little care taken with overall presentation Unsatisfactory creation of online activity

65 EDU3473 Lecture F65 For this week: Stop talking and start doingStop talking and start doing Action plan, by Friday I will ………Action plan, by Friday I will ………


Download ppt "EDU3473 Lecture F1 Pedagogy, ICTs and HOTS Petrea Redmond."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google